Recipes | Breads, Muffins & Biscuits

Skillet Low FODMAP Scallion Bacon Cornbread

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Our Skillet Low FODMAP Scallion Bacon Cornbread in made in a cast-iron skillet. Toasty on the outside, tender on the inside with the nubbly texture of stone-ground cornmeal. Scallion greens, bacon and lactose-free faux buttermilk round out the dish.

close overhead image of ow FODMAP Scallion Bacon Cornbread on wooden board
A rustic cornbread made in a cast-iron skillet. Bacon and scallions make this possibly the most delicious cornbread you have ever eaten. Easy to make, too.

We love this as a side to a main meal – or for breakfast with eggs. The butter/maple syrup glaze is optional, but oh so delicious.

We Can’t Stop At One Cornbread

We love cornbread, so we have a few renditions for you. There are cornbread muffins, and we also have a Pumpkin Cornbread, which is another great variation. 

This Skillet Low FODMAP Scallion Bacon Cornbread is a little different. Part of the recipe is cooked right in the skillet on top of the stove, and then eventually the cornbread is baked in the oven in the same pan.

You could try other types of skillets, but cast-iron conducts heat in a certain way that creates the best texture for this cornbread – inside and out. You will need a 10-inch (25 cm) cast-iron skillet.

closeup of low FODMAP Scallion Bacon Cornbread
You start by cooking the bacon in the same pan you bake the cornbread in.
Is Cornmeal Low FODMAP?

There are actually many corn products that are low FODMAP and that have been lab tested by Monash University and FODMAP Friendly, from fresh corn, canned corn, creamed corn, corn chips, corn tortillas (with and without gums), as well as polenta – and those are just some of the corn products that you can enjoy, even during Elimination. As always, it comes down to portion control.
 
Also, not all cornmeal is created equal, in terms of corn quality, how it is ground, and very important to note, texture, which is what I want to address here. I wanted a somewhat rustic texture for this cornbread, so I am calling for a medium-grind cornmeal. If you use fine cornmeal or coarse, this recipe will not turn out as shown or promised.
 
Please use the ingredients called for – always! But especially with baking.

Bob's Red Mill bag of medium grind cornmeal

Is Bacon Low FODMAP?

Proteins contain no FODMAPs, so when we are looking at meat products such as bacon, we just have to look at how they are processed and/or cured. We have much more in our article, Is Bacon Low FODMAP, which gives you shopping tips on how to shop for low FODMAP bacon.
 
BTW some bacon throws off more fat than other bacon. You want some bacon fat in your pan to receive the cornbread batter, but not too much. The directions below give you specifics.
 

Are Scallions Low FODMAP?

Onion flavor is greatly missed by many FODMAPers, but there are many ways to get your onion flavor without FODMAPs or stomach upset. Scallion greens are one way and we put them to good use in this recipe. Make sure you chop just the green parts.
 
You can read more in our Explore An Ingredient: Scallions article.

Is Buttermilk Low FODMAP?

As of this writing we do not have access to low FODMAP or lactose-free buttermilk in the U.S. so we make an approximation. It is a faux buttermilk – a soured milk, really – that uses lactose-free milk and lemon juice. This cornbread recipe is based upon using our faux lactose-free buttermilk made with lactose-free whole milk.
 

Making Skillet Low FODMAP Scallion Bacon Cornbread

Position rack in middle of oven. Preheat oven to 425°F (220°C).

Place the bacon in a 10-inch (25 cm) cast iron skillet and set over low-medium heat.

raw bacon in cast iron pan

Cook bacon, flipping once, until crisp.

cooked bacon in cast iron pan

Remove bacon to paper towels to absorb excess fat. Leave 1 tablespoon bacon fat in pan; save or discard the rest. Place bacon strips back in pan.

Meanwhile, whisk the cornmeal, flour, baking powder, salt and baking soda together in a medium sized mixing bowl to aerate and combine.

dry ingredients for cornbread in glass bowl

Have your lactose-free buttermilk made and ready to go.

making faux buttermilk in glass measuring cup
Can’t find lactose-free buttermilk at the store? No problem! We have a recipe.

In a separate bowl whisk together the lactose-free buttermilk, maple syrup, oil and the eggs until well combined.

eggs and buttermilk in glass bowl

Combine the wet and dry ingredients.

whisking wet and dry ingredients together for cornbread
This cornbread is easy to make with a few bowls and a whisk.

Fold in the chopped scallions.

folding scallions into cornbread batter

Scrape into cast-iron pan over bacon.

spreading cornbread batter over bacon

Spread evenly to fill the pan.

raw cornbread batter in pan

Bake cornbread for about 20 to 30 minutes or until golden brown and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.

scallion bacon cornbread baked in pan

All to cool for about 5 minutes, then unmold, so you can see the pretty bacon. Brush with optional graze, if using. Simply stir the butter and maple syrup together and brush over the top. Serve immediately. Skillet Low FODMAP Scallion Bacon Cornbread is best served the same day.

slice of low FODMAP Scallion Bacon Cornbread

The first time we made this Skillet Low FODMAP Scallion Bacon Cornbread we served it with smoked brisket, potato salad and coleslaw and it was phenomenal – and NO ONE knew anything on the plate was “diet” food.

smoked brisket, cornbread, potato salad and coleslaw on white plate
Our Scallion Bacon Cornbread is great as a snack, or as a side to a meal.

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

  • Eggs: Eggs are high in protein and do not contain carbohydrates, according to Monash University.
  • Lactose-Free Dairy: Lactose-free dairy, such as lactose-free milk or lactose-free cream cheese, has lactase enzyme added that breaks the disaccharide molecules and creates a more digestible dairy product, from a lactose perspective. The resulting product is not dairy-free, but it is lactose-free. Some products might have miniscule amounts of lactose remaining, but the amount is small enough for the product to be labeled as lactose-free. For instance, Breyers Lactose-Free Vanilla Ice Cream states it is 99% lactose-free, while Lactaid Vanilla Ice Cream states it is 100% lactose-free.
  • Lemon Juice: Monash University has lab tested lemon juice and it is low FODMAP in ½ cup (125 g) amounts.
  • Maple Syrup: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested maple syrup. Monash says that maple syrup is Green light and low FODMAP in servings of 2 Australian tablespoons (50 g). FODMAP Friendly gives it a “Pass” at 2 tablespoons (53 g). These amounts are likely recommended due to Australian healthy eating guidelines; no upper limit is posted by either Monash or FODMAP Friendly.
  • Oil: All pure oils are fats and contain no carbohydrates, therefore they contain no FODMAPs.
  • Scallions: The green parts of scallions are low FODMAP as determined by Monash University lab testing and can be used to add onion flavor to your low FODMAP cooking.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Low FODMAP Scallion Bacon Cornbread unmolded out of pan and on wooden board
4.67 from 3 votes

Skillet Low FODMAP Scallion Bacon Cornbread

Our Skillet Low FODMAP Scallion Bacon Cornbread in made in a cast-iron skillet. Toasty on the outside, tender on the inside with the nubbly texture of stone-ground cornmeal. Scallion greens, bacon and lactose-free faux buttermilk round out the dish. We love this as a side to a main meal – or for breakfast with eggs. The butter/maple syrup glaze is optional, but oh so delicious.

Makes: 8 Servings
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 40 minutes
Total Time: 50 minutes
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

Cornbread:

  • 6 slices meaty bacon
  • 1 ½ cups (228 g) medium grind cornmeal, such as Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Medium Grind Cornmeal
  • ¾ cup (109 g) low FODMAP gluten-free all-purpose flour, such as Bob’s Red Mill 1 to 1 Gluten Free Baking Flour
  • 2 ½ teaspoons baking powder; use gluten-free if following a gluten-free diet
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 ¼ cups (300 ml) lactose-free buttermilk
  • ¼ cup (60 ml) pure maple syrup
  • ¼ cup (60 ml) neutral flavor vegetable oil, such as canola
  • 2 large eggs, at room temperature
  • ¼ cup (16 g) chopped scallions, green parts only

Glaze – Optional

  • 1 tablespoon melted unsalted butter
  • 1 tablespoon pure maple syrup

Preparation:

  1. Position rack in middle of oven. Preheat oven to 425°F (220°C).
  2. Place the bacon in a 10-inch (25 cm) cast iron skillet and set over low-medium heat. Cook bacon, flipping once, until crisp. Remove bacon to paper towels to absorb excess fat. Leave 1 tablespoon bacon fat in pan; save or discard the rest. Place bacon strips back in pan.
  3. Meanwhile, whisk the cornmeal, flour, baking powder, salt and baking soda together in a medium sized mixing bowl to aerate and combine.
  4. In a separate bowl whisk together the lactose-free buttermilk, maple syrup, oil and the eggs until well combined. Combine the wet and dry ingredients, then fold in the chopped scallions. Scrape into cast-iron pan over bacon and spread evenly to fill the pan.
  5. Bake cornbread for about 20 to 30 minutes or until golden brown and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. All to cool for about 5 minutes, then unmold, so you can see the pretty bacon. Brush with optional graze, if using. Simply stir the butter and maple syrup together and brush over the top. Serve immediately cut into 8 wedges. Skillet Low FODMAP Scallion Bacon Cornbread is best served the same day.

Notes:

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

Eggs: Eggs are high in protein and do not contain carbohydrates, according to Monash University.
• Lactose-Free Dairy: Lactose-free dairy, such as lactose-free milk or lactose-free cream cheese, has lactase enzyme added that breaks the disaccharide molecules and creates a more digestible dairy product, from a lactose perspective. The resulting product is not dairy-free, but it is lactose-free. Some products might have miniscule amounts of lactose remaining, but the amount is small enough for the product to be labeled as lactose-free. For instance, Breyers Lactose-Free Vanilla Ice Cream states it is 99% lactose-free, while Lactaid Vanilla Ice Cream states it is 100% lactose-free.
• Lemon Juice: Monash University has lab tested lemon juice and it is low FODMAP in ½ cup (125 g) amounts.
Maple Syrup: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested maple syrup. Monash says that maple syrup is Green light and low FODMAP in servings of 2 Australian tablespoons (50 g). FODMAP Friendly gives it a “Pass” at 2 tablespoons (53 g). These amounts are likely recommended due to Australian healthy eating guidelines; no upper limit is posted by either Monash or FODMAP Friendly.
Oil: All pure oils are fats and contain no carbohydrates, therefore they contain no FODMAPs.
Scallions: The green parts of scallions are low FODMAP as determined by Monash University lab testing and can be used to add onion flavor to your low FODMAP cooking.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Course: bread, Side Dish
Cuisine: American

Nutrition

Calories: 363kcal | Carbohydrates: 37g | Protein: 12g | Fat: 18g | Sodium: 485mg | Potassium: 22mg | Fiber: 5g | Sugar: 7g | Calcium: 11mg | Iron: 1mg

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.