Recipes | Breads, Muffins & Biscuits

Vegan Low FODMAP Cornbread

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We are huge cornbread fans: alongside BBQ, slathered with peanut butter for breakfast, and did you know you could even have it with butter and a little bit of honey and still be low FODMAP? But we also know that those following a vegan diet want their own recipe, and here it is – our fluffy and tender Vegan Low FODMAP Cornbread! And, it is gluten-free as well.

closeup of Low FODMAP cornbread on cooling rack against blue backdrop and flowered cloth

Please read the recipe through as it calls for some particular ingredients that you might not have on hand.

Frequently Asked Questions

What Is Ener-G Egg Replacer?

Ener-G Egg Replacer is a dry, powdery shelf-stable product that is mixed with water to create a vegan “egg”. In recipes that typically call for eggs, such as traditional cornbread, this product brings the texture and binding qualities that we need when a real egg is not used.
 
Here are the ingredients, which are all low FODMAP: Potato starch, tapioca starch flour, leavening (calcium lactate [not derived from dairy], calcium carbonate, cream of tartar), Sodium Carboxymethylcellulose, methylcellulose.

Is Cornmeal Low FODMAP?

Cornmeal is low FODMAP. It is called “Polenta (cornmeal)” on the Monash app and has a generous low FODMAP serving size of 225 g (with no Moderate or High amounts given). What we have to pay attention to when baking is the type of cornmeal. It comes in a wide variety of textures from powdery soft to very coarse.
 
When making a recipe like cornbread it is very important that you use what is recommended. For this recipe I used Indian Head Old Fashioned Stone Ground Yellow Corn Meal, which is a finer grind. It brings a whole grain wholesomeness along with a soft texture that allows the development of a fluffy texture in the finished cornbread.

Why Do You Add Lemon Juice To The Alt Milk?

This Vegan Low FODMAP Cornbread uses unsweetened almond milk. The lemon juice added to the alt milk makes it a “soured milk” akin to buttermilk. Many cornbread recipes use buttermilk as a liquid as the acidic nature of it adds tenderness to the finished dish. This way you can get the qualities that buttermilk would bring, but in vegan form.

vegan cornbread square held in hand
You won’t believe how light and fluffy this cornbread is – or that it is vegan!

Making Vegan Low FODMAP Cornbread

Make sure you have the right type of fine-grained cornmeal, to start.

Then, make the soured milk right away. It only has to sit for a few minutes before you use it, but it does need that time. If you do this in a large enough measuring cup, you can also use it to combine all the wet ingredients. Use this time to make the “vegan egg” as well.

making an Ener-G egg in a glass bowl
To make this kind of vegan “egg” you simply stir the dry Ener-G Egg Replacer mixture together with warm water.

Our Whole Foods carries the Ener-G Egg Replacer product, but you might have to source it ahead of time, online.

ingredients for vegan cornbread on marble counter
Here you can see our almond milk in the measuring cup souring for a few minutes after lemon juice is added.

I like to melt my vegan margarine in the microwave in a suitable bowl.

melted vegan buttery spread in glass bowl
I use Earth Balance Buttery Sticks.

Simply whisk the dry ingredients together first and set aside. No need for an electric mixer, just a sturdy whisk.

Combine your melted buttery margarine, soured alt milk and the Ener-G “egg”, then whisk this wet mixture into your dry, just until well combined. That’s it!

mixing wet and dry ingredents for cornbread in bowl with whisk

Spread into an even layer in your prepared pan.

cornbread batter in square metal baking pan

Bake until a toothpick tests clean and then cool the pan, at least briefly, on a wire rack.

vegan cornbread baked in square pan

But do take advantage of eating the cornbread warm, if you can. Nothing like it! Grab a square!

vegan cornbread on white cutting board cut into 16 squares

FODMAP Information

All recipes are based upon Monash University & FODMAP Friendly science at time of initial publication.

  • Cornmeal: Monash University has lab tested cornmeal, which they list as “Polenta (cornmeal)” and a low FODMAP serving size is 255 g, but that is for cooked. They also have a listing for “Flour, corn (masa harina/masa lista)”, and that low FODMAP serving size is 100 g. Masa harina is cornmeal that is treated with lime (calcium hydroxide), a process called nixtamalization. In personal conversations with Monash, we were told that “regular” cornmeal would be the same as the masa, FODMAP-wise, and that the process of using the lime alkaline solution would not affect FODMAPs.
  • Sugar: Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested white, granulated sugar. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving size of white sugar is ¼ cup (50 g). FODMAP Friendly simply states that they have tested 1 tablespoon and that it is low FODMAP. Regular granulated white sugar is sucrose, which is a disaccharide made up of equal parts glucose and fructose. Sucrose is broken down and absorbed efficiently in the small intestine. 

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. Foods will be retested from time to time; in the case of raw ingredients, such as fruits and vegetables, results may vary. All lab tested results are valid and represent a snapshot in time. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

the inside of a piece of Low FODMAP cornbread held in hand
Take a bite! It is light, fluffy and full of whole grain goodness.

More Corny Recipes

If you are a cornbread – or cornmeal – fan, we have more recipes for you!

closeup of Low FODMAP cornbread on cooling rack against blue backdrop and flowered cloth
5 from 2 votes

Vegan Low FODMAP Cornbread

We are huge cornbread fans: alongside BBQ, slathered with peanut butter for breakfast, and did you know you could even have it with butter and a little bit of honey and still be low FODMAP? But we also know that those following a vegan diet want their own recipe, and here it is! Our fluffy and tender Vegan Low FODMAP Cornbread!

Makes: 16 Servings
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Total Time: 35 minutes
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

  • 1 ¼ cups (300 ml) unsweetened almond milk
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons warm water
  • 1 ½ teaspoons Ener-G Egg Replacer
  • 1 ¼ cups (173 g) fine-ground cornmeal, such as Indian Head Old Fashioned Stone Ground Yellow Corn Meal
  • 1 cup (145 g) low FODMAP gluten-free al-purpose flour, such as Bob’s Red Mill 1 to 1 Gluten Free Baking Flour
  • 1/3 cup (65 g) sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder; use gluten-free if following a gluten-free diet
  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ¼ cup (57 g) melted butter replacement, such as Earth Balance Vegan Buttery Sticks, cooled

Preparation:

  1. Position rack in middle of oven. Preheat oven to 400°F (200°C). Coat an 8-inch by 8-inch (20 cm by 20 cm) square metal baking pan with nonstick spray.
  2. Measure out your almond milk and whisk in the lemon juice; set aside for 5 minutes. In a small bowl, whisk together the warm water and Ener-G Egg Replacer; set aside as well.
  3. Add the cornmeal, flour, sugar, baking powder, salt and baking soda to a large mixing bowl; whisk to combine. In a separate bowl whisk together the soured alt milk, vegan “egg” and the melted buttery margarine. Add the wet mixture to the dry and whisk just until combined.
  4. Scrape cornbread batter into the prepared pan and smooth the top, if needed, into an even layer.
  5. Bake for about 20 to 25 minutes, until a toothpick comes out clean. Place pan on wire rack and allow to cool for about 5 minutes – but do try it warm if you can time it right! Cut into 16 servings (4 by 4 grid) and serve. Cornbread can be stored in an airtight container, once cooled, at room temperature for up to 2 days. It also freezes well for up to a month. Just wrap up thoroughly in plastic wrap and then slip into a zip top bag.

Notes:

FODMAP Information

All recipes are based upon Monash University & FODMAP Friendly science at time of initial publication.

Cornmeal: Monash University has lab tested cornmeal, which they list as “Polenta (cornmeal)” and a low FODMAP serving size is 255 g, but that is for cooked. They also have a listing for “Flour, corn (masa harina/masa lista)”, and that low FODMAP serving size is 100 g. Masa harina is cornmeal that is treated with lime (calcium hydroxide), a process called nixtamalization. In personal conversations with Monash, we were told that “regular” cornmeal would be the same as the masa, FODMAP-wise, and that the process of using the lime alkaline solution would not affect FODMAPs.
Sugar: Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested white, granulated sugar. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving size of white sugar is ¼ cup (50 g). FODMAP Friendly simply states that they have tested 1 tablespoon and that it is low FODMAP. Regular granulated white sugar is sucrose, which is a disaccharide made up of equal parts glucose and fructose. Sucrose is broken down and absorbed efficiently in the small intestine.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. Foods will be retested from time to time; in the case of raw ingredients, such as fruits and vegetables, results may vary. All lab tested results are valid and represent a snapshot in time. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Course: bread, Side Dish
Cuisine: American

Nutrition

Calories: 115kcal | Carbohydrates: 20g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 3g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 218mg | Potassium: 1mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 5g | Vitamin A: 1IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 6mg | Iron: 1mg

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.