Recipes | Comfort Food

Vegan Red, White & Blue Popsicles – Low FODMAP

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Few foods are more fun or tastier than our Vegan FODMAP Red, White & Blue Popsicles – low FODMAP, too, of course – and they are actually easy to make at home. You do need a popsicle mold, and they are not all created equal; more on that below. Get ready for a strawberry layer, a dairy-free coconut layer and a blueberry layer. These pops are sweet, but not-too-sweet, and happen to be vegan!

overhead image of vegan red, white and blue popsicles on white plate
Our Vegan Red, White and Blue Popsicles are low FODMAP, easy to make, and combine strawberry, coconut and blueberry flavors.

Kids love eating these AND making them. Let them help. They will get a kick out of creating the three distinct layers.

Choose Your Popsicle Mold

Here’s the deal. There are popsicle molds with tiny 2-ounce (60 ml) volumes, and molds that hold 4 times that amount, and everything in-between. So, the point is that it is difficult to standardize a popsicle recipe, since the molds you have in your cupboard might be different from the one used here.

mold for popsicles on quartz surface, peonies in background
I love these Tovolo Star Popsicle Molds. They are easy to use and clean, and make fancy looking pops!

Pre-FODMAP I would have said, hey, don’t worry about it! Use what you have, just dividing the popsicle mixture amongst your pop molds. But, because we are following the low FODMAP diet and the diet is very much related to serving size, then in order to have this recipe remain low FODMAP, I urge you to use the pop mold recommended, or at least a mold that holds the same volume – 4-ounces (120 ml) each.

vegan red, white and blue low FODMAP pops on popsicle mold

Tovolo Popsicle Mold

For our Vegan Red, White & Blue Popsicles I used Tovolo Star Pop Molds. There are 6 in the set, with their own base, which holds them upright in the freezer. Each pop holds 4-ounces (120 ml) of liquid and potential pop deliciousness. The base, that holds the popsicle stick, acts as a drip-guard to keep hands clean.

vegan red, white and blue pop held in hand
The handles provide a drip-free eating experience.
Do I Need A Popsicle Mold?

Yes, I think you do. Sure, you can make pops in little paper cups with wooden craft sticks, but by the time you buy these items and struggle to keep the stick upright and straight you will have spent just as much money (or almost) and the result will not be as great.
 
Buy a popsicle mold. And while you are at it, buy the one I used! As long as you take care of it and don’t lose the sticks, it will last forever.

How Do You Keep The Three Layers Neat & Separate?

It is all about being patient and freezing the strawberry layer before adding the coconut layer and then freezing the pops again before adding the blueberry layer. It will work! Just make sure to clear out space in your freezer for the molds to be held on a flat surface.
 
Also, please pay attention to the fact that you are freezing the strawberry and coconut layers JUST until firm. If they are too frozen, you will not be able to insert the popsicle stick.

Are These Pops Dairy Free?

Our Vegan Red, White & Blue Popsicles are vegan, so yes, they are dairy-free! The creaminess is provided by the coconut milk layer in the middle.

Is Coconut Low FODMAP?

There are many kinds of coconut that you can enjoy on the low FODMAP diet. We have an entire article for you titled, Is Coconut Low FODMAP? where we take you through all of the coconut products from coconut water to the various kinds of coconut milk, coconut oil, dried coconut etc.

What Kind Of Coconut Milk Should I Use?

This recipe uses canned coconut milk. Look for pure, 100% unsweetened coconut milk. I like the light versions – sometimes spelled “lite” – for this recipe. The fruit strawberry and blueberry parts are a little icy, like a good fruit pop should be, which makes these pops super refreshing. I find the light coconut milk is a little creamy, but not so rich and creamy like the full-fat version, and it balances the best with the juicy, slightly icy fruit layers.

Can I Substitute For The Coconut Milk?

The recipe has been tested for flavor, texture and FODMAP load as presented. I do not recommend any substitutions. If you want to try another alt milk, I suggest using something with a lot of body and a high fat content. Perhaps try oat milk, or an almond milk based creamer.

Are Strawberries Low FODMAP?

Great question! There are many questions surrounding strawberries because Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested strawberries and have shown different FODMAP results, which has people confused. We answer these question in full in our Explore An Ingredient: Strawberries.
 
For the purposes of this recipe, rest assured that each pop, which equals one serving, falls well within Monash University recommendations, which are our usual default.

Are Blueberries Low FODMAP?

Blueberries have been lab tested by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly. FODMAP Friendly gives them a “Pass” at 1 cup or 150 g. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving is a heaping ¼ cup or 40 g. In their tests the fruit jumped to Moderate FODMAP levels quickly at ⅓ cup or 50 g. 
 
One popsicle, which is one serving, is well within low FODMAP portions.

Do I Need A Blender?

Depending on the strength and accuracy of your machine, you could try to make the fruit layers in a food processor fitted with a metal blade. I much prefer using a blender. The strength and quality of your blender will make a difference, too. I use a Vitamix. They are pricey, but so worth it.

Do I Have To Strain The Fruit Mixtures?

Yes, you do. It might seem like an unnecessary step, but it will help create the best texture in the finished popsicles. Use a very fine-meshed strainer like this oneSimply press the fruit mixture though the strainer with a firm silicone spatula.

Can I Reduce The Sugar?

White granulated sugar, just so you know, is not a FODMAP issue. Read more in our Explore An Ingredient: Sugar. Sugar not only provides sweetness in these pops, but it helps their texture as well. I made these during one testing round with 2 teaspoons of sugar with each of the fruit layers, and the pops worked, but they were not quite sweet enough and they were very hard and icy. Your choice, but do not use less than that.
 

bite taken out of red, white and blue popsicle, held in wmen's hand against grey background
Let them soften a bit before you bite!

How To Make Vegan Red, White & Blue Popsicles 

Place strawberries, 1 tablespoon of the sugar, and 2 teaspoons of the lemon juice in a blender carafe.

stawberries, sugar and lemon juice in blender carafe

Blend until smooth. Scrape down carafe as needed to make sure the ingredients are thoroughly blended and smooth. Press mixture through a fine mesh strainer into a bowl or large measuring cup with a spout, using a silicone spatula and pressing firmly.

pressing strawberry purée through fine mesh strainer over glass bowl
Straining the fruit purées through a fine mesh strainer is a necessary step.

Discard solids. Divide into the 6 pop molds and freeze until just firm, about 30 minutes.

vegan red, white and blue low FODMAP pops being made, showing strawberry layer
Use a small spoon to get the fruit purée into the molds, or pour through a funnel.

While strawberry mixture is freezing, whisk together the coconut milk, vanilla extract and 2 teaspoons of the sugar in a large measuring cup with a spout.

canned lite coconut milk, sugar and vanilla extract in glass bowl

Remove molds from freezer; top each with the coconut milk, dividing evenly. Freeze until just firm, about 30 minutes.

vegan red, white and blue low FODMAP pops being made, showing coconut milk layer

Place blueberries, 1 tablespoon of the sugar, and 2 teaspoons of the lemon juice in a blender carafe and blend until smooth. Scrape down carafe as needed to make sure the ingredients are thoroughly blended and smooth. Press mixture through a fine mesh strainer into a bowl or large measuring cup with a spout, using a silicone spatula and pressing firmly. Discard solids.

blueberry purée in fine mesh strainer set over glass bowl

Divide into the 6 pop molds, insert popsicle sticks and freeze until solid, about 6 hours. I usually freeze overnight at this point. Just before serving, run molds briefly under hot water to release popsicles from molds. 

vegan red, white and blue low FODMAP pops frozen in their popsicle mold
Here are our pops, frozen and ready to eat.

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

  • Blueberries: Blueberries have been lab tested by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly. FODMAP Friendly gives them a “Pass” at 1 cup or 150 g. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving is a heaping ¼ cup or 40 g. In their tests the fruit jumped to Moderate FODMAP levels quickly at ⅓ cup or 50 g.
  • Coconut Milk: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly has lab tested coconut milk for FODMAPs. Monash divides their testing into a few categories. Here are Monash’s statements: Coconut milk with inulin is Red Light high FODMAP at ½ cup (125 ml) or 120 g. There is no information on smaller amounts. UHT (long life, shelf-stable) coconut milk is Green Light low FODMAP at ¾ cup (180 g). Canned coconut milk is Green Light low FODMAP at ¼ cup or 60 g. They also have some brands represented, such as Sanitarium, and their unsweetened coconut milk, which is a shelf-stable type, is low FODMAP at 1 cup (250 g). FODMAP Friendly gives coconut milk a “Fail” at 4-ounces (125 ml) but we do not know what kind they tested. There are a few things to note. First of all, the FODMAP content obviously varies greatly depending on type of processing. Also, although “lite” or “light” canned coconut milk has not been tested, it is the same as canned but with a higher water content, so you can use the canned coconut milk amounts designated and know that you are within low FODMAP serving sizes.
  • Strawberries: This popular berry has been lab tested by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly. Monash lab testing reports that no FODMAPs were detected in strawberries. They suggest 10 medium berries (150 g) as a serving. FODMAP Friendly gives strawberries a “pass” and pegs 10 medium berries at (140 g).
  • Sugar: Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested white, granulated sugar. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving size of white sugar is ¼ cup (50 g). FODMAP Friendly simply states that they have tested 1 tablespoon and that it is low FODMAP. Regular granulated white sugar is sucrose, which is a disaccharide made up of equal parts glucose and fructose. Sucrose is broken down and absorbed efficiently in the small intestine. 

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

overhead image of vegan red, white and blue popsicles on white plate
5 from 1 vote

Vegan Red, White & Blue Popsicles – Low FODMAP

Few foods are more fun or tastier than our Vegan FODMAP Red, White & Blue Popsicles – low FODMAP, too, of course – and they are actually easy to make at home. You do need a popsicle mold, and they are not all created equal; more on that below. Get ready for a strawberry layer, a dairy-free coconut layer and a blueberry layer. These pops are sweet, but not-too-sweet, and happen to be vegan!

Low FODMAP Serving Size Info: Makes 6 pops; 6 servings; 1 pop per serving

Makes: 6 Servings
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Chilling Time: 7 hours
Total Time: 7 hours 20 minutes
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

  • 6- ounces (170 g) hulled chopped strawberries
  • 2 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons granulated sugar, divided
  • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice, divided
  • ¼ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ¾ cup (180 ml)  canned light (or “lite) pure unsweetened coconut milk, such as Thai Kitchen brand, stirred well; do not use refrigerated style coconut milk
  • 6- ounces (170 g) fresh blueberries, picked over for stems

Preparation:

  1. Place strawberries, 1 tablespoon of the sugar, and 2 teaspoons of the lemon juice in a blender carafe and blend until smooth. Scrape down carafe as needed to make sure the ingredients are thoroughly blended and smooth. Press mixture through a fine mesh strainer into a bowl or large measuring cup with a spout, using a silicone spatula and pressing firmly. Discard solids. Divide into the 6 pop molds and freeze until just firm, about 30 minutes.
  2. While strawberry mixture is freezing, whisk together the coconut milk, vanilla extract and 2 teaspoons of the sugar in a large measuring cup with a spout. Remove molds from freezer; top each with the coconut milk, dividing evenly. Freeze until just firm, about 30 minutes.
  3. Place blueberries, 1 tablespoon of the sugar, and 2 teaspoons of the lemon juice in a blender carafe and blend until smooth. Scrape down carafe as needed to make sure the ingredients are thoroughly blended and smooth. Press mixture through a fine mesh strainer into a bowl or large measuring cup with a spout, using a silicone spatula and pressing firmly. Discard solids. Divide into the 6 pop molds, insert popsicle sticks and freeze until solid, about 6 hours. I usually freeze overnight at this point. Just before serving, run molds briefly under hot water to release popsicles from molds.

Notes:

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

Blueberries: Blueberries have been lab tested by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly. FODMAP Friendly gives them a “Pass” at 1 cup or 150 g. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving is a heaping ¼ cup or 40 g. In their tests the fruit jumped to Moderate FODMAP levels quickly at ⅓ cup or 50 g.
Coconut Milk: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly has lab tested coconut milk for FODMAPs. Monash divides their testing into a few categories. Here are Monash’s statements: Coconut milk with inulin is Red Light high FODMAP at ½ cup (125 ml) or 120 g. There is no information on smaller amounts. UHT (long life, shelf-stable) coconut milk is Green Light low FODMAP at ¾ cup (180 g). Canned coconut milk is Green Light low FODMAP at ¼ cup or 60 g. They also have some brands represented, such as Sanitarium, and their unsweetened coconut milk, which is a shelf-stable type, is low FODMAP at 1 cup (250 g). FODMAP Friendly gives coconut milk a “Fail” at 4-ounces (125 ml) but we do not know what kind they tested. There are a few things to note. First of all, the FODMAP content obviously varies greatly depending on type of processing. Also, although “lite” or “light” canned coconut milk has not been tested, it is the same as canned but with a higher water content, so you can use the canned coconut milk amounts designated and know that you are within low FODMAP serving sizes.
Strawberries: This popular berry has been lab tested by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly. Monash lab testing reports that no FODMAPs were detected in strawberries. They suggest 10 medium berries (150 g) as a serving. FODMAP Friendly gives strawberries a “pass” and pegs 10 medium berries at (140 g).
Sugar: Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested white, granulated sugar. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving size of white sugar is ¼ cup (50 g). FODMAP Friendly simply states that they have tested 1 tablespoon and that it is low FODMAP. Regular granulated white sugar is sucrose, which is a disaccharide made up of equal parts glucose and fructose. Sucrose is broken down and absorbed efficiently in the small intestine.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Course: Dessert, Snack, Treat
Cuisine: American

Nutrition

Calories: 65kcal | Carbohydrates: 11g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 2g | Sodium: 1mg | Potassium: 1mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 5g | Calcium: 1mg | Iron: 1mg

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.