Recipes | Breads, Muffins & Biscuits

Low FODMAP Baked Chocolate Doughnuts

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These Low FODMAP Baked Chocolate Doughnuts are the chocolaty companion to our Low FODMAP Baked Doughnuts, which are our basic baked doughnut. Both are gluten-free and much lower in fat than fried. But if you want fried, we have two yeast-raised, jelly-filled doughnuts, too!

sprinkle covered low FODMAP Baked Chocolate Doughnut held in manicured hand; over rack holding doughnuts

I Have Made Thousands Of Doughnuts

If you love doughnuts, you have come to right place. We have basic baked doughnuts, these Low FODMAP Baked Chocolate Doughnuts and two yeast-raised jelly doughnuts – one filled with jelly before frying and one filled after frying.

And I wrote a book on doughnuts called A Baker’s Guide To Doughnuts. I have literally made thousands and have learned a thing or two in the process. The book is not a low FODMAP book but if you like doughnuts you will get a lot of inspiration for adjusting and creating compliant recipes.

holding a cocoa glazed chocolate doughnut with multi-colored sprinkles

You Need A Doughnut Pan

You need a doughnut pan to make this recipe and our Low FODMAP Baked Doughnuts. I use this one from Norpro in the Test Kitchen. Get two if you can as the recipe makes 12 doughnuts and each pan has 6 wells. You can also halve the recipe.

bite taken out of chocolate doughnut, held in hand, turned towards camera

Use The Right Flour & Cocoa

For these doughnuts I recommend Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free 1 to 1 Baking Flour and natural cocoa.

If you bake with cocoa a lot, I highly recommend that you read All About Cocoa & FODMAPs.

Some common U.S. brands of natural cocoa are Hershey’sScharffen Berger and Ghirardelli. I also like Penzey’s Natural High Fat Cocoa and also Callebaut Natural Cocoa Powder.

You can also substitute half black cocoa if you like for an even darker, Oreo-like flavor. Below are some pictures of a batch made with the addition of black cocoa.

chocolate doughnuts made with some black cocoa
A batch of Low FODMAP Baked Chocolate Doughnuts made withy half black cocoa. Left to right: plain, cinnamon-sugar coated, confectioners’ sugar coated.

Are Chocolate Doughnuts Hard To Make?

Are doughnuts hard to make? Not these Low FODMAP Baked Chocolate Doughnuts! The batter is as simple as a dry mixture and a wet mixture combined and then piped into the special pans.

It helps to have a pastry bag and a plain round tip to get the batter into the pans, but you could use two teaspoons to get it in there.

4 Low FODMAP baked Chocolate Doughnuts with various toppings on rack

Can I Apply Different Toppings?

Have fun with different toppings. You can toss with confectioners’ sugar, plain sugar or cinnamon sugar. Or, you can also make our LUSCIOUS Cocoa Glaze. See the ideas below.

And then there are the sprinkles…and yes, they are low FODMAP!

Low FODMAP baked Chocolate Doughnuts with various toppings on rack

How To Make Low FODMAP Baked Chocolate Doughnuts

Read through the recipe before you begin so that you are acquainted with the timing of the baking and then the topping/glazing process.

Coat your pans with nonstick spray.

Important Note: If you are going to toss the doughnuts in a Cinnamon Sugar Topping, have it prepared and ready to go. The doughnuts must be rolled in the dry topping while warm for best adherence.

I like to dip some of the doughnuts in the Cocoa Glaze and some in the Cinnamon Sugar Topping. The Cocoa Glaze can be made while the doughnuts are baking. And trust me, there is nothing wrong with one of these Low FODMAP Baked Chocolate Doughnuts enjoyed plain.

The confectioners’ sugar sticks better than the Cinnamon Sugar Topping, but the doughnuts should still be rolled in it while warm.

Let’s Make Doughnuts

For the doughnuts, whisk the dry ingredients together in a large bowl or stand mixer bowl.

dry mixture for Chocolate Baked Doughnuts in bowl

Place the wet ingredients in separate bowl, and whisk well to combine. Then add the wet to the dry and whisk/mix until combined.

add wet to dry and combine for low FODMAP Chocolate Baked Doughnut batter

Batter is now ready to be piped into prepared pans.

plain tip in pastry bag ready to pipe baked doughnut batter

If you don’t have the round tip, you can spoon the batter in. Just get it in there!

baked chocolate doughnut batter in pans

Bake until a toothpick almost tests clean and they will be dry tot he touch and springy.

low FODMAP Baked chocolate doughnuts finsihed baking, in pan and cooling

Get Glazin’!

Using your fingers and hands is the best way to toss the warm doughnuts around in the dry toppings or for dipping in and out and flipping over in the wet glaze.

dipping a chocolate doughnut in a cocoa glaze

Once your doughnuts have toppings applied, they should still be warm. EAT THEM NOW!

More Doughnuts!

Check out our:

sprinkle covered low FODMAP Baked Chocolate Doughnut held in manicured hand; over rack holding doughnuts
4 from 2 votes

Low FODMAP Baked Chocolate Doughnuts

These Low FODMAP Baked Chocolate Doughnuts are the chocolaty companion to our Low FODMAP Baked Doughnuts, which are our basic baked doughnut. Both are gluten-free and much lower in fat than fried. But if you want fried, we have two yeast-raised, jelly-filled doughnuts, too!

Low FODMAP Serving Size Info: Makes 12 doughnuts; 12 servings; 1 doughnut per serving

Makes: 12 Servings
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 12 minutes
Total Time: 32 minutes
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

Chocolate Baked Doughnuts:

  • 2 cups (290 g) low FODMAP gluten-free all-purpose flour, such as Bob’s Red Mill 1 to 1 Gluten Free Flour
  • 1 cup (198 g) sugar
  • ½ cup (43 g) sifted natural cocoa powder
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder; use gluten-free if following a gluten-free diet
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 ½ cups to 2 cups (360 ml to 480 ml) lactose-free whole milk, at room temperature
  • ½ cup (120 ml) neutral flavored oil, such as canola or rice bran
  • 2 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • Pastry bag
  • ½- inch (12 mm) round tip such as Ateco #806

Cinnamon Sugar; optional – enough for entire batch

  • 1 cup (198 g) sugar or superfine sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon

Confectioners' Sugar; optional - enough for entire batch

Cocoa Doughnut Glaze; optional – enough for entire batch

Preparation:

  1. For the Chocolate Doughnuts: Position rack in the middle of the oven. Preheat oven to 350˚F (180°C). Coat two standard sized doughnut pans (12 wells total) with nonstick spray; set aside. Make sure that any dry toppings you want to use are prepared and ready to go. The Cocoa Glaze can be made while they are baking.

  2. Whisk together the flour, sugar, cocoa, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a large bowl to aerate and combine.
  3. In a separate bowl whisk together 1 ½ cups (360 ml) of milk, oil, eggs and vanilla until well combined. Pour the wet ingredients over the dry mixture and whisk just until combined; change to a wooden spoon or spatula to combine if necessary. (You can also do this in a stand mixer with a flat paddle). If the mixture is very thick, use some or all of the remaining milk. I find it varies because different cocoas give different results. Scrape mixture into pastry bag fitted with tip and pipe the batter evenly between the two pans.
  4. Bake for about 10 to 12 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center shows a few moist crumbs when removed.
  5. Make the Cocoa Glaze while doughnuts are baking. Simply whisk together the confectioners’ sugar, cocoa, vanilla and 2 tablespoons of milk until very smooth and thick but fluid. Add more milk if necessary.

  6. When doughnuts are done, cool pans on racks for about 1 minute. Unmold directly on the racks to cool very briefly, BUT, coat them in the dry coatings while very warm. Cool almost completely before glazing with Cocoa Glaze.
  7. For the Cinnamon Sugar Topping: Stir the sugar and cinnamon together in a shallow bowl, large enough to hold a doughnut. When ready to use, place a warm doughnut on top of the mixture and toss around to coat thoroughly.

  8. For Confectioners’ Sugar Topping: Place sifted confectioners’ sugar in a shallow bowl, large enough to hold a doughnut. When ready to use, place a warm doughnut on top of the mixture and toss around to coat thoroughly.

  9. To coat with Cocoa Glaze simply dip the doughnuts one at a time, pressing the doughnut at least halfway down into the glaze, then pick up, flip over and place on rack for the glaze to firm up while you glaze remining doughnuts. Add sprinkles, if using, while glaze is wet.
  10. Doughnuts are best eaten ASAP!

Tips

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

  • Eggs: Eggs are high in protein and do not contain carbohydrates, according to Monash University.
  • Oil: All pure oils are fats and contain no carbohydrates, therefore they contain no FODMAPs.
  • Sugar: Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested white, granulated sugar. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving size of white sugar is 1/4 cup (50 g). FODMAP Friendly simply states that they have tested 1 tablespoon and that it is low FODMAP. Regular granulated white sugar is sucrose, which is a disaccharide made up of equal parts glucose and fructose. Sucrose is broken down and absorbed efficiently in the small intestine.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Course: Breakfast, brunch, Snack, Treat
Cuisine: American

Nutrition

Calories: 286kcal | Carbohydrates: 44g | Protein: 4g | Fat: 12g | Sodium: 211mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 21g

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.