Recipes | Breads, Muffins & Biscuits

Low FODMAP Coconut Lime Bread

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Our Low FODMAP Coconut Lime Bread will make it into your regular rotation of quick breads – we are betting on it. Everyone knows banana bread (and we have a few of those) but this one features coconut milk, coconut oil and grated dried coconut along with tangy lime juice and zest. Triple the coconut and double the lime in a very tender-crumbed loaf with a fancy looking, but simple, glaze and topping.

side view of coconut lime bread on a wooden board, icing dripping down; white plates and green napkin in background

What Is A Quick Bread?

Quick breads live up to their name – they are quick! The batter for this coconut lime bread can be made while the oven preheats.

Quick breads depend on chemical leaveners, such as baking powder and baking soda; no yeast involved. The technique is as simple as combining wet and dry mixtures. You don’t even need a mixer.

overhead image of while loaf of coconut lime bread on a wooden board with glaze dripping down the sides

Quick breads are great recipes for beginner bakers. Check out our:

three-quarter angle closeup of coconut lime bread on a wooden board; glaze dripping down

What Is Unrefined Coconut Oil?

This recipe for Low FODMAP Coconut Lime Bread uses coconut oil as the fat. You could use another vegetable oil, such as canola, but why give up a chance to impart more coconut flavor?

But you have you know what kind of coconut oil to buy. There is refined and unrefined. Here’s what you should tuck away as helpful info:

  • Unrefined coconut oil does have a coconut flavor. We use it in recipes such as this one where we want to accentuate coconut flavor.
  • Refined coconut oil does not have any coconut flavor.
  • Both unrefined and refined coconut oil are low FODMAP.
  • They can be used interchangeably in recipes. Simply use the same amount, but the dish’s flavor will be affected.

low angle image of coconut lime bread on a wooden board with glaze dripping down the sides

Let’s Talk Coconut & FODMAPs

Along with the coconut oil, which contains No FODMAPs, this recipe also calls for coconut milk and shredded coconut. Both do contain FODMAPs, but they have low FODMAP serving sizes, which are reflected in the serving sizes of this bread.

Coconut Milk

Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly has lab tested coconut milk for FODMAPs.

Monash divides their testing into a few categories. Here are Monash’s statements:

  • Coconut milk with inulin is Red Light high FODMAP at ½ cup (125 ml) or 120 g. There is no information on smaller amounts.
  • UHT (long life, shelf-stable) coconut milk is Green Light low FODMAP at ¾ cup (180 g).
  • Canned coconut milk is Green Light low FODMAP at ¼ cup or 60 g.
  • They also have some brands represented, such as Sanitarium, and their unsweetened coconut milk, which is a shelf-stable type, is low FODMAP at 1 cup (250 g).

FODMAP Friendly gives coconut milk a “Fail” at 4-ounces (125 ml) but we do not know what kind they tested.

cutaway piece of coconut lime bread sitting on a wooden board. White plates in background

There are a few things to note. First of all, the FODMAP content obviously varies greatly depending on type of processing. Also, although “lite” or “light” canned coconut milk has not been tested, it is the same as canned but with a higher water content, so you can use the canned coconut milk amounts designated and know that you are within low FODMAP serving sizes.

For this recipe I like full-fat canned coconut milk for its rich flavor and texture.

overhead image of coconut lime quick bread on board, a few slices as well as a loaf

Shredded Dried Coconut

Dried coconut has been lab tested by both FODMAP Friendly and Monash University. Monash states has established that the low FODMAP amount is ½ cup (30 g). FODMAP Friendly gives it a “Pass” at 4 tablespoons or 25 g.

slice of coconut lime bread, on white plate, held in hand

How To Make Low FODMAP Coconut Lime Bread

The batter for this bread is easy enough as you will see. It is simply a matter of making a dry mixture and a wet and combining them together.

I like adding the lime zest to the wet mixture to help disperse those citrus oils better for maximum flavor.

Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C). Coat an 8-inch by 4-inch (20 cm by 10 cm) loaf pan with cooking spray, line with parchment paper, overhanging the two short sides, then coat the paper, too and set aside.

8-inch (20 cm) loaf pan, lined with parchment and coated with nonstick spray

In a large bowl, place the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt.

dry mixture including flour and sugar in glass bowl

Whisk together and make a well in the center.

making a well in the center of dry ingredients in a glass bowl

People sometimes ask me what this means. It literally means making a depression in the center, where you will pour the wet mixture.

pointing to the well made in a bowl of dry ingredients in a glass bowl
Pointing to the well made in the center of a bowl of dry ingredients.

In a separate bowl place the coconut milk, coconut oil, eggs, lime zest and juice and vanilla extract.

wet ingredients for coconut lime bread in glass bowl, ready to be whisked

Whisk together well, then pour into the well of the dry mixture. Stir and fold until a few floury streaks remain. Fold in ½ cup (38 g) coconut.

folding flaked coconut nut into batter in a glass bowl

Pour batter into prepared pan.

batter for coconut lime bread in parchment lined pan

Bake for 30 minutes. Sprinkle remaining 2 tablespoons of coconut over the loaf. Continue baking for about 25 to 30 minutes longer, or until bamboo skewer inserted in the center comes out clean. Place the loaf pan on a cooling rack until just warm, then use parchment paper to help unmold. Cool upright on wire rack.

baked loaf of coconut lime bread, unmolded from pan on white marble surface

For the Glaze & Topping: Whisk together confectioner’s sugar and lime juice until smooth. Fresh squeezed lime juice makes a huge difference here!

lime juice in small measuring cup with pouring spout hovering over glass bowl of confectioners' sugar

Whisk until very smooth with a flowable texture.

whisking lime juice and confectioners' sugar together in a stainless steel bowl, making a simple glaze

Drizzle the glaze over the cooled bread and while glaze is still wet, sprinkle with coconut and lime zest. Allow to sit a few minutes until topping sets. Loaf is ready to slice and serve or may be stored in an airtight container at room temperature for 3 days. I like to slice with a serrated knife.

coconut lime bread on a wooden board with whole loaf in background and slices near the front of the board

Coconut Lover’s Unite

And since we know you are a coconut lover, be sure to read our in-depth article, Is Coconut Low FODMAP? Obviously, you know that many kinds are, but the article covers it all: coconut water, pictures of the various types of dried coconut, the various types of milks compared, etc.

side view of coconut lime bread on a wooden board, icing dripping down; white plates and green napkin in background
5 from 3 votes

Low FODMAP Coconut Lime Bread

Our Low FODMAP Coconut Lime Bread will make it into regular rotation of quick breads – we promise. Everyone knows banana bread (and we have a few of those) but this one features coconut milk, coconut oil and grated dried coconut along with tangy lime juice and zest. Triple the coconut and double the lime in a very tender-crumbed loaf with a fancy looking, but simply, glaze and topping.

Makes: 12 Servings
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour
Total Time: 1 hour 10 minutes
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

Bread:

  • 1 1/3 cups (194 g) low FODMAP gluten-free all-purpose flour, such as Bob’s Red Mill 1 to 1 Gluten Free Baking Flour
  • 1 cup (198 g) sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder; use gluten-free if following a gluten-free diet
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 cup (180 ml) canned full-fat coconut milk, at room temperature
  • 1/2 cup (120 ml) unrefined coconut oil, melted and cooled
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 tablespoons very fine lime zest, made with a rasp-style zester
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lime juice
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup (38 g) plus 2 tablespoons sweetened flaked coconut, divided

Glaze & Topping:

Preparation:

  1. For the Bread: Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C). Coat an 8 ½-inch by 4 ¼-inch (21.5 cm by 10.5 cm) loaf pan with cooking spray, line with parchment paper, overhanging the two short sides, then coat the paper, too and set aside.

  2. In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt; make a well in the center. In a separate bowl place the coconut milk, coconut oil, eggs, lime zest and juice and vanilla extract and whisk together well.
  3. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients. Stir and fold until a few floury streaks remain. Fold in ½ cup (38 g) coconut. Pour batter into prepared pan.
  4. Bake for 30 minutes. Sprinkle remaining 2 tablespoons of coconut over the loaf. Continue baking for about 25 to 30 minutes longer, or until bamboo skewer inserted in the center comes out clean. Place the loaf pan on a cooling rack until just warm, then use parchment paper to help unmold. Cool upright on wire rack.
  5. For the Glaze & Topping: Whisk together confectioner’s sugar and lime juice until smooth. Drizzle the glaze over the cooled bread and while glaze is still wet, sprinkle with coconut and lime zest. Allow to sit a few minutes until topping sets. Loaf is ready to slice and serve or may be stored in an airtight container at room temperature for 3 days. I like to slice with a serrated knife.

Tips

FODMAP Information

  • Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.
    Coconut Milk: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly has lab tested coconut milk for FODMAPs. Monash divides their testing into a few categories. Here are Monash’s statements:

• Coconut milk with inulin is Red Light high FODMAP at ½ cup (125 ml) or 120 g. There is no information on smaller amounts.
• UHT (long life, shelf-stable) coconut milk is Green Light low FODMAP at ¾ cup (180 g).
• Canned coconut milk is Green Light low FODMAP at ¼ cup or 60 g.
• They also have some brands represented, such as Sanitarium, and their unsweetened coconut milk, which is a shelf-stable type, is low FODMAP at 1 cup (250 g).

  • FODMAP Friendly gives coconut milk a “Fail” at 4-ounces (125 ml) but we do not know what kind they tested.
  • There are a few things to note. First of all, the FODMAP content obviously varies greatly depending on type of processing. Also, although “lite” or “light” canned coconut milk has not been tested, it is the same as canned but with a higher water content, so you can use the canned coconut milk amounts designated and know that you are within low FODMAP serving sizes.
  • Dried Coconut: Dried coconut has been lab tested by both FODMAP Friendly and Monash University. Monash states has established that the low FODMAP amount is ½ cup (30 g). FODMAP Friendly gives it a “Pass” at 4 tablespoons or 25 g.
  • Eggs: Eggs are high in protein and do not contain carbohydrates, according to Monash University.
  • Lime Juice: Monash University has lab tested lime juice and it is low FODMAP in 1 cup (250 g) amounts (double that of lemon juice, as an interesting fact).
  • Oil: All pure oils are fats and contain no carbohydrates, therefore they contain no FODMAPs.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Course: bread, Breakfast, brunch, Snack
Cuisine: American

Nutrition

Calories: 328kcal | Carbohydrates: 48g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 15g | Saturated Fat: 3g | Cholesterol: 3mg | Sodium: 172mg | Potassium: 44mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 32g | Calcium: 1mg | Iron: 1mg

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.