Recipes | Desserts & Pastries

Low FODMAP Hazelnut Shortcake with Berries & Caramel

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Our Low FODMAP Hazelnut Shortcake with Berries & Caramel is one gigantic cookie-like shortcake made with ground hazelnuts (a low FODMAP amount, of course). The topping is fresh berries folded together with some of our Low FODMAP Salted Caramel Sauce.

overhead hazelnut shortcake on brass platter with berries

Luscious Berry Desserts

Luscious Berry Desserts is the name of the book that features the original version of this dessert. The original recipe was not gluten-free or low FODMAP, but I fell in love with the idea of it and had to FODMAP IT!™. Luckily it took very well to the conversion process.

low FODMAP hazelnut shortcake topped with mixed berries against blue background

Making It LOFO

I have been using the term “LOFO” more and more and on occasion someone asks me what it means; “low FODMAP” of course! To make the original version of this dessert LOFO I had to monitor the amounts of berries as well as hazelnuts, to start.

hazelnut shortcake with berries; close-up, on brass plate

Berries & FODMAPs

All the specific information about berries is below in the Tips section of the recipe. You will be using strawberries, blueberries, raspberries and blackberries.

I want to point out that strawberries contain no FODMAPs and that FODMAP Friendly has lab tested blackberries and they give them a low FODMAP “Pass” at 1 cup (150 g). Yes, this is different from what Monash has reported (see below). As always, eat to your tolerances.

close up of hazelnut shortcake with berries

Hazelnuts & FODMAPs

Hazelnuts have been lab tested for FODMAPs by Monash University. 15 g, or about 10 nuts, are Green Light low FODMAP. They become Moderate for FODMAPs at double the amount.

If you can buy skinned hazelnuts, you will save a lot of time, but you will pay the price, literally. They are not cheap. Or, you can buy skin-on and remove the skins yourself.

Skinning Hazelnuts

There are two main approaches to skinning hazelnuts: a dry method and a wet method. I am more partial to the dry method, which I will describe below. You can read about the wet method at Bakepedia.

hazelnuts on a wooden board; skinned on the left; skin intact on the right

The dry technique will skin and toast hazelnuts all at once. Spread nuts in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet pan and toast at 350°F (180°C) until they begin to give off an aroma, the skins have turned dark brown and have split – usually about 8 to 10 minutes. Shake the pan once or twice during toasting to encourage even browning.

Remove from the oven and cool briefly on a rack, then take a clean kitchen towels and rub the nuts vigorously between them. With a little work, the skins will come off. Bits of papery skin will be everywhere. We like to do this over a large, wide bowl to catch the skins with another smaller bowl nearby to place the skinned nuts as you go. Sometimes a few hazelnuts retain a tiny bit of extra-stubborn skin on them; that’s okay. Now you can proceed with the recipe. Make sure the nuts are completely cool before grinding in the food processor.

DIY Lactose-Free Dairy & Caramel

This recipe calls for lactose-free heavy cream. If you cannot locate any in your supermarkets, you can always make your own and we give you directions in our article on DIY Lactose-Free Dairy.

The recipe also calls for ½ cup (120 ml) of prepared Salted Caramel Sauce, so plan accordingly.

How To Make Low FODMAP Hazelnut Shortcake with Berries & Caramel

Preheat oven to 400°F (200°C). Coat the inside of a 9-inch (23 cm) round springform pan with nonstick spray; set aside.

Place hazelnuts in food processor fitted with metal blade and pulse on and off until finely ground. My nuts had a bit of stubborn skin left on left, hence the color. That’s okay, but the less skin the better.

ground hazelnuts in food processor

Pour into a mixing bowl, then add flour, ¼-cup of the brown sugar, baking powder and salt to the same bowl.

ingredients for hazelnut shortcake in mixing bowl_

Combine with a sturdy fork until well mixed.

hazelnut ingredients combined in bowl with fork

Pour in the cream…

combining wet and dry ingredients in bowl

…and keep stirring and tossing with fork until large moist clumps form.

making hazelnut shortbread dough

Test dough by squeezing between fingers; it should hold together (keep mixing if it doesn’t).

checking texture of dough; it should hold together as shown, squeezing between fingers

Press dough into prepared pan using fingertips…

patting hazelnut crust into round pan

…or the bottom of a flat measuring cup.

using measuring cup to press dough into pan

Sprinkle the top with remaining 1 tablespoon brown sugar.

brown sugar sprinkled on shortbread in pan

Bake for about 30 minutes or until just beginning to take on a golden color around the edges.

baked shortcake in pan, golen brown

Cool on a rack, unmold, then place shortcake on serving platter.

baked whole hazelnut shortbread being transferred to brass plate

I LOVE that huge cake spatula. It makes moving large baked goods a cinch!

large round cake spatula

For the Filling

Place all of the berries in a mixing bowl and toss them together gently.

tossing berries together in bowl

Pour caramel sauce over the berries and fold together very gently.

pouring caramel over berries in bowl

Then mound on top of the shortcake. Serve immediately.

For More Berries Desserts…

overhead hazelnut shortcake on brass platter with berries
5 from 2 votes

Low FODMAP Hazelnut Shortcake with Berries & Caramel

Our Low FODMAP Hazelnut Shortcake with Berries & Caramel is one gigantic cookie-like shortcake made with ground hazelnuts (a low FODMAP amount, of course). The topping is fresh berries folded together with some of our Low FODMAP Salted Caramel Sauce.

Makes: 8 Servings
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 50 minutes
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

Hazelnut Shortcake:

Berry Topping:

  • 10- ounces (280 g) fresh strawberries, hulled and halved or quartered (depending on size), at room temperature
  • 6- ounces (170 g) fresh blueberries, at room temperature
  • 3- ounces (85 g) fresh raspberries, at room temperature
  • 2- ounces (55 g) fresh blackberries, at room temperature
  • ½ cup (120 ml) Low FODMAP Salted Caramel Sauce, fluid and ready to use

Preparation:

  1. For the Shortcake: Position rack in middle of oven. Preheat oven to 400°F (200°C). Coat the inside of a 9-inch (23 cm) round springform pan with nonstick spray; set aside.

  2. Place nuts in food processor fitted with metal blade and pulse on and off until finely ground. Pour into a mixing bowl, then add flour, ¼-cup of the brown sugar, baking powder and salt to the same bowl. Combine with a sturdy fork until well mixed. Pour in the cream and keep stirring and tossing with fork until large moist clumps form. Test dough by squeezing between fingers; it should hold together (keep mixing if it doesn’t).
  3. Press dough into prepared pan using fingertips or the bottom of a flat measuring cup. Sprinkle the top with remaining 1 tablespoon brown sugar.
  4. Bake for about 30 minutes or until just beginning to take on a golden color around the edges. Cool on a rack, unmold, then place shortcake on serving platter.
  5. For the Filling & Assembly: Place all of the berries in a mixing bowl. Pour caramel sauce over the berries and fold gently, then mound on top of the shortcake. Serve immediately, cut into wedges.

Tips

The original recipe suggested serving with softly whipped cream. If you do well with fat and have access to lactose-free heavy cream you could consider this option.

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

  • Blackberries: Blackberries have been lab tested by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly. The Monash lab results state that 1 small berry at 4g is Green Light low FODMAP. FODMAP Friendly has lab tested blackberries and gives them a “Pass” at 1 cup (150 g).
  • Blueberries: Blueberries have been lab tested by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly. FODMAP Friendly gives them a “Pass” at 1 cup or 150 g. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving is a heaping ¼ cup or 40 g. In their tests the fruit jumped to Moderate FODMAP levels quickly at 1/3 cup or 50 g.
  • Hazelnuts: Hazelnuts have been lab tested for FODMAPs by Monash University. 15 g, or about 10 nuts, are Green Light low FODMAP. They become Moderate for FODMAPs at double the amount.
  • Raspberries: Raspberries have been lab tested by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly. FODMAP Friendly gives them a “Pass” at 10 berries or 45 g. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving is 30 berries or 60 g. In their tests the fruit jumped to Moderate FODMAP levels quickly at 35 berries or 65 g.
  • Strawberries: This popular berry has been lab tested by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly. Monash lab testing reports that no FODMAPs were detected in strawberries. They suggest 10 medium berries (150 g) as a serving. FODMAP Friendly gives strawberries a “pass” and pegs 10 medium berries at (140 g).
  • Sugar: Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested white, granulated sugar. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving size of white sugar is 1/4 cup (50 g). FODMAP Friendly simply states that they have tested 1 tablespoon and that it is low FODMAP. Regular granulated white sugar is sucrose, which is a disaccharide made up of equal parts glucose and fructose. Sucrose is broken down and absorbed efficiently in the small intestine.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Course: Dessert
Cuisine: American

Nutrition

Calories: 386kcal | Carbohydrates: 54g | Protein: 4g | Fat: 14g | Sodium: 277mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 9g

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.