Recipes | Desserts & Pastries

Low FODMAP Mixed Berry Terrine

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Our Low FODMAP Mixed Berry Terrine is the perfect choice when you want a gorgeous dessert that is light, low calorie, low fat and absolutely packed with fresh fruit flavor. It is based on unflavored gelatin dissolved in just enough liquid to hold all of those strawberries, blueberries and raspberries together. You can make it in a loaf and unmold it, as we did here, or make it even simpler in a clear glass bowl.

three-quarters view of Low FODMAP Mixed Berry Terrine on an oval black plate; blue background

Jell-O vs. Unflavored Gelatin

If you live in the U.S., when you think of gelatin you probably think of Jell-O gelatin. And we have nothing against Jell-O gelatin, in fact Dédé has quite a collection of Jell-O-themed vintage cookbooks.

Jello books

But the thing with Jell-O is that it is gelatin, food coloring, artificial flavors and sugar. That’s about it, which is the opposite of what this Low FODMAP Mixed Berry Terrine is about. This recipe is about real fruit flavor and color and is elegant enough for a party and probably won’t be relegated to an after-school snack (although it makes a pretty kick-ass snack if you are feeling fancy).

overhead of Low FODMAP Mixed Berry Terrine on an oval black plate; blue surface

Use Knox Gelatin

For this recipe we use granulated unflavored gelatin, such as Knox gelatin. It can be purchased in easy to use packets and also in bulk. Here is a vintage Knox booklet! Don’t you love it?

Knox cookbook

Some recipes give you a gelatin measurement, such as 1 teaspoon. Others give directions such as “1 packet”. Both of these directions make assumptions about how you are buying your gelatin.

closeup of short end of Low FODMAP Mixed Berry Terrine on an oval black plate; outside on deck - garden in background

After years of working with gelatin I have found that weight is the best way to represent it, partially because so many people have inaccurate measuring spoons!

Knox gelatine

But I also will present the gelatin amount in several ways so that no matter how you have it in the pantry, packets or bulk, you will be able to easily follow the recipe.

side view of Low FODMAP Mixed Berry Terrine on an oval black plate; outside on deck - garden in background

A Note On Sheet Gelatin

Note that in some areas of the world, sheet gelatin is more common. According to Knox, 1 packet of their gelatin, which weighs 7 g, has the same gelling strength as 5 sheets (2-⅞-inch by 8-½-inch) leaf gelatine. If you want to convert the recipe, you are free to try, but as I know that sheet gelatin can come in varying strength (gelling) levels, you may or may not have success.

Gelatin & FODMAPs

Gelatin is protein and it is not a FODMAP issue. In fact, when you look at the nutrition label it contains 0 g carbohydrates and 0 g fat.

vertical image of Low FODMAP Mixed Berry Terrine on an oval black plate; outside in sun

How To Use Unflavored Gelatin

Each packet of Knox Unflavored gelatin, which weighs 7 g, and measures 2 ½ teaspoons, will gel 2 cups (480 ml) of liquid.

To use it most effectively, you must first soften the gelatin in a small amount of room temperature or cool liquid. Once softened it will then be dissolved in a generous amount of very hot liquid and stirred until dissolved. As long as you follow the directions, it works like a charm.

What Liquid Can I Use?

You can actually choose a variety of liquids for this Low FODMAP Mixed Berry Terrine, but I have 1 strong recommendation, and 1 requirement:

  1. It is strongly recommended that you use a clear liquid, or aesthetically the results will be very different from what you see here. I used part unsweetened cranberry juice and part lime seltzer (sparkling water). More on this later.
  2. The must is that you need to stick to 2 cups (480 ml) for proper gelling. This becomes especially important if you are unmolding the terrine.

slice of Low FODMAP Mixed Berry Terrine on an oval black plate; outside on deck in sunlight

Cranberry Juice & FODMAPs

According to the Monash app cranberry juice has been lab tested and it is low FODMAP in 1 glass (their words) or 200 ml.

This was starter information, as far as we were concerned, so we reached out to Monash for clarification. Being based in the U.S. we know that in our markets we can find cranberry juice that is sugar sweetened, cranberry juice that contains high fructose corn syrup, cranberry juice that contain no added sugars, but is sweetened with other fruit juices, and we also have unsweetened cranberry juice.

Monash responded that the juice tested did not contain any HFCS and their direct quote was, “it would probably be best to stick to cranberry juice without HFCS”.

Given this information our recipes including cranberry juice have followed Monash recommendations.

Low FODMAP Mixed Berry Terrine on an oval black plate; outside on deck - garden in background

Clear Liquids

Here are clear liquids that will work well in our Low FODMAP Mixed Berry Terrine:

  • Water – When mixed with strong flavored juices, like unsweetened cranberry juice.
  • Seltzer (sparkling water) – Unflavored and flavored, when mixed with strong flavored juices, like unsweetened cranberry juice. The carbonation effect is subtle.
  • Ginger Ale – The carbonation effect is subtle.
  • Various Cordials – In Australia in particular there are many low FODMAP cordials that could be used.
  • Sparkling Wine – Inexpensive prosecco, cava or sparkling wine. White, rosé or red!
  • Wine – I prefer the sparkling route, but you can use a low FODMAP still wine as well.

The key is to use 2 cups (480 ml) liquid total.

A Note On Sugar

Read the recipe through so you are acquainted with the process. The recipe calls for 2/3 cup (131 g) of sugar but this is largely based on the liquids that I used and the level of sweetening that was needed. (Our unsweetened cranberry juice is very tart).

Taste your liquid, or blend of liquids, and simply add the amount of sugar that you would like, taking into consideration that the berries will improve with a little sweetening as well. I would say add ¼ cup (50 g) even if your liquids are sweet enough on their own.

Choosing Your Mold

Terrines are interesting things. The term “terrine” is used to describe a finished dish and also is an actual physical dish, usually a loaf shape. And that loaf shape is usually a deep, rectangular, straight-sided dish.

For my Low FODMAP Mixed Berry Terrine I used an 8 ½ inch by 4 ¼ inch (21.5 cm by 10.5 cm) loaf pan (seen on the left below). This dimension will give you the nice tall, square shape you see in the images. You could use a 9-inch by 5-inch (23 cm x 12 cm) loaf pan, but the terrine will end up being more squat, and less dramatic, with its slightly flared sides (seen on the right below).

comparing loaf pans

It is all about volume. The loaf pan I use is about a 6-cup (1.4 L) volume and a standard 9-inch (23 cm) loaf pan is more like 7-cups (1.7 L).

And of course, if you want to make it in a bowl and not unmold it, just shoot for a 6 cup to 7 cup (1.4 L to 1.7 L) bowl.

Whether you choose a vessel for eventual unmolding, or whether you want to choose a simple bowl, I suggest straight simple sides – so, no cut glass for a bowl, or intricate molds – for best visual impact.

Berries & FODMAPs

This Low FODMAP Mixed Berry Terrine showcases blueberries, strawberries and raspberries.

Because strawberries contain no FODMAPs, I used these in the greatest volume.

Blueberries have been lab tested by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly. FODMAP Friendly gives them a “Pass” at 1 cup or 150 g. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving is a heaping ¼ cup or 40 g. In their tests the fruit jumped to Moderate FODMAP levels quickly at ⅓ cup or 50 g.

Raspberries have been lab tested by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly. FODMAP Friendly gives them a “Pass” at 10 berries or 45 g. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving is 30 berries or 60 g. In their tests the fruit jumped to Moderate FODMAP levels quickly at 35 berries or 65 g.

So many people think that fruit is off-limits from a FODMAP perspective, and hopefully these descriptions show you otherwise.

If you stick to our serving sizes, the dessert remains low FODMAP.

For another recipe that features mixed berries, try our Low FODMAP Hazelnut Shortcake with Berries & Caramel.

Can I Make This With Other Flavors?

You can make this with other fruits and the juice or liquid oof your choice – but you will have to make the FODMAP calculations yourself.

Stick with about 5 cups of fruit, 14 g or gelatin and 2 cups (480 ml) of liquid. Pick and choose fruit and liquid carefully, making sure they are low FODMAP and keep FODMAP Stacking in mind.

Also, if using raw fruit, do not use kiwi, pineapple, figs, papaya or prickly pear as they contain protease enzymes which will prevent the gelatin from setting up firmly.

How To Make Low FODMAP Mixed Berry Terrine

First prep your fruit and place it in your mold. It should almost fill the volume of the mold, if you are going to be unmolding it in the end. If you are just using a pretty glass bowl, you have more leeway. Aim for a 6 to 7-cup (1.4 L to 1.7 L) volume.

tossing cut fruit together in metal loaf pan for terrine

Soften your gelatin by sprinkling it over a small amount of your liquid. To ultimately dissolve your gelatin properly, you must soften it first. This is an important step!

softening gelatin in cranberry juice in a clear glass bowl

Meanwhile, heat the rest of your liquid along with the sugar, whisking to dissolve the sugar. Get the liquid nice and hot, then stir in the softened gelatin and whisk until it dissolves.

Juice heating in a saucepan; getting ready to add softened gelatin

Pour the warm liquid over your berries in their mold. It should just about cover the berries. If you have used a carbonated beverage as I did, there might be some foam and bubbles. Tap the mold on the counter a few times to minimize the bubbles a bit.

liquid gelatin poured over fruit in loaf pan; bubbles are from lime seltzer

Then, simply refrigerate the mold for at least 4 hours before unmolding and serving. It is lovely as is, or serve with Whipped Cream.

side view of Low FODMAP Mixed Berry Terrine on an oval black plate; outside on deck - garden in background
5 from 2 votes

Low FODMAP Mixed Berry Terrine

Our Low FODMAP Mixed Berry Terrine is the perfect choice when you want a gorgeous dessert that is light, low calorie, low fat and absolutely packed with fresh fruit flavor. It is based on unflavored gelatin dissolved in just enough liquid to hold all of those strawberries, blueberries and raspberries together. You can make it in a loaf and unmold it, as we did here, or make it even simpler in a clear glass bowl.

Makes: 10 Servings
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 5 minutes
Chilling Time: 4 hours
Total Time: 4 hours 20 minutes
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

  • 1- pound (455 g) fresh strawberries, hulled and chopped or sliced
  • 6- ounces (170 g) fresh blueberries
  • 4- ounces (115 g) fresh raspberries
  • 1 cup (240 ml) unsweetened cranberry juice
  • 1 cup (240 ml) lime seltzer
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons of unflavored gelatin, such as Knox; this is equal to two, 7g packets of Knox or a total of 14 g (if using bulk)
  • 2/3 cup (131 g) sugar
  • Whipped Cream; optional

Preparation:

  1. Have your mold or bowl ready; it does not require any prep. Toss the berries together in your mold of choice. If using the recommended 6-cup (1.4 L), 8 ½-inch by 4 ¼-inch (21.5 cm by 10.5 cm) loaf pan the fruit will come almost to the very top. Set aside.
  2. Stir together your 2 cups (480 ml) of chosen liquid, in this case the cranberry juice and seltzer, and stir in the lemon juice. Pour about ½ cup (120 ml) into a small bowl and sprinkle the gelatin over it; allow it to sit for 5 minutes to soften. Meanwhile whisk the remaining liquid and sugar in a saucepan and heat until very hot. If you have used a carbonated liquid, keep stirring gently to release the majority of the bubbles.
  3. Scrape the softened gelatin into the hot juice mixture and whisk until dissolved. Pour this liquid over the fruit in your mold. There is basically just enough liquid to fill in the spaces between the fruit. Again, if you have used a carbonated beverage, you might get a bunch of bubbles. Tap the molds on the counter a few times to break them up.
  4. Refrigerate for at least 4 hours or until the gelatin is set. You can cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight. If you are going to unmold, choose a large, flat platter and dip the outside of the mold in a larger bowl filled with hot tap water, just briefly. Make sure no hot water comes over the edge onto the gelatin. Wiggle the mold to determine if the gelatin has released from the mold. Place platter on top, invert (you might have to jiggle the mold back and forth) and it should release! Serve with whipped cream, if desired. The terrine is ready to serve.

Tips

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

  • Blueberries: Blueberries have been lab tested by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly. FODMAP Friendly gives them a “Pass” at 1 cup or 150 g. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving is a heaping ¼ cup or 40 g. In their tests the fruit jumped to Moderate FODMAP levels quickly at 1/3 cup or 50 g.
  • Raspberries: Raspberries have been lab tested by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly. FODMAP Friendly gives them a “Pass” at 10 berries or 45 g. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving is 30 berries or 60 g. In their tests the fruit jumped to Moderate FODMAP levels quickly at 35 berries or 65 g.
  • Strawberries: This popular berry has been lab tested by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly. Monash lab testing reports that no FODMAPs were detected in strawberries. They suggest 10 medium berries (150 g) as a serving. FODMAP Friendly gives strawberries a “pass” and pegs 10 medium berries at (140 g).
  • Sugar: Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested white, granulated sugar. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving size of white sugar is 1/4 cup (50 g). FODMAP Friendly simply states that they have tested 1 tablespoon and that it is low FODMAP. Regular granulated white sugar is sucrose, which is a disaccharide made up of equal parts glucose and fructose. Sucrose is broken down and absorbed efficiently in the small intestine.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Course: Dessert
Cuisine: American

Nutrition

Calories: 101kcal | Carbohydrates: 25g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 1g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 1mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 19g | Vitamin C: 1mg

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.