Recipes | Desserts & Pastries

Low FODMAP Peach Crisp

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This recipe for Low FODMAP Peach Crisp has a basic version and one gussied up with ginger and pecans – your choice! Yellow peaches contain sorbitol, and this recipe is recommended for those who have passed their sorbitol Challenge. You are going to love the juicy peach filling and crisp, golden brown, buttery brown sugar oat topping and the whole shebang is super simple to make.

Close Up of Low FODMAP peach crisp on white plate with floral napkins and silver spoons
Crunchy, buttery, brown sugar oat topping complements the juicy fruit filling perfectly.

Calling all beginner bakers! This is a very easy dessert to make – even if you do not consider yourself to be a cook or baker.

One-Bowl Crisp Topping

Crisps are one of the easiest desserts to make. When I first started making crisp toppings way back when I would cut cold butter into the dry mixture. This is not exactly hard, but it does take some time, elbow grease and a hand-held pastry blender, which not everyone has. 

Then one day a long time ago I decided to melt the butter instead – and voila! Not only is the topping easier to put together, but if you melt the butter in a microwave safe bowl then you can go on to make the crisp in one bowl, and quickly, too. Five minutes and you are done!

horizontal overhead image of Low FODMAP peach crisp on white plate with floral napkins and silver spoons
Serving warm makes this peach crisp extra special.

Yellow Peaches Contain Sorbitol

Monash University lab testing informs us that yellow peaches contain sorbitol and are low FODMAP in 30 g amounts. When you test Polyols, you will discover just how much Polyol content you can tolerate and will hopefully divide your Challenges into testing yourself for tolerance to sorbitol as well as mannitol. (PS: you can use cauliflower to test your tolerance to mannitol).

We know if can appear confusing and we strongly suggest doing your Challenges with a Registered Dietitian to help guide you.

vertical image of peacg crisp on plate held by woman's manicured hand
Yellow peaches contain sorbitol. This dessert is recommended for those who have passed their sorbitol Challenge.

This Recipe Is For You If You Have Passed Your Sorbitol Challenge

This recipe features yellow peaches, and we suggest it for those who have passed their Challenge for sorbitol.

vertical overhead image of Low FODMAP peach crisp on white plate with floral napkins and silver spoons

Frequently Asked Questions

What Are Polyols?

FODMAP is an acronym for Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides and Polyols. 
 
Polyols are small-chain carbohydrates that occur naturally in certain fruits and vegetables and are used as additives in prepared foods. The two Polyols that have been extensively evaluated by the Monash University researcher are sorbitol and mannitol.
 
Read more in our article, What Are Polyols? Learn All About the “P” in FODMAP!

Are Peaches Low FODMAP?

Monash University has lab tested both white and yellow peaches and reported their findings in their smartphone app. Yellow peaches have a more generous low FODMAP serving size, so we used them in this recipe.
 
You can read more in our article on Peaches.

What Is The Best Way To Peel Peaches?

You can drop the peaches in boiling water for about 30 to 60 seconds and then slip off the skin, but we often find it just as easy to use a hand-held peeler. You need a good sharp one.

Where Are The Apples?

Looking for an apple crisp? In our research we have found that apple crisp and peach crisp are the two most beloved.
 
We have a Low FODMAP Apple & Grape Crisp for you, with low FODMAP amounts of apples! It takes advantage of no FODMAP grapes. Maybe you have never cooked or baked with grapes – you are in for a treat. Be sure to check that recipe out.

Where’s The Peach Cobbler?

This is funny (to us, anyway). We did some research and assumed that peach cobbler was going to be much more popular than peach crisp. According to the amount of search traffic that each get on Google, the peach crisp wins by a landslide! That surprised us.
 
So, we created this peach crisp first, but we didn’t want to leave you peach cobbler people out in the cold. We have a Low FODMAP Peach Cobbler for you, too!

How To Make Low FODMAP Peach Crisp

Position rack in center of oven. Preheat oven to 375°F (190°C). Coat the inside of a ceramic or ovenproof glass 8-inch (20 cm) square baking dish with nonstick spray; set aside.

For the Peach Filling: Cut peaches right into bowl, to catch juices.

peeled peach wedges cut directly into bowl, shown with knife
Peel peaches with a vegetable peeler and cut into wedges directly into mixing bowl to catch juices.

Toss the peach wedges together in a bowl with sugar, flour, lemon juice, ground ginger if using and a pinch of salt. Set aside to sit while you make the topping.

raw peach crisp ingredients in bowl

For the Crisp Topping: Melt the butter in a medium-size microwave-safe mixing bowl in the microwave on low.

melted butter in glass bowl
If you melt butter in a microwave safe bowl, you can then make the topping in that same bowl.

(Or melt the butter in a small saucepan on your stove top, if you like, then transfer to a medium-size mixing bowl.)

Chop your pecans finely, if using.

chopped pecans on white board
The pecans are optional for the topping, but are a nice touch.

Whisk in the brown sugar, then whisk in the flour, oats, pecans if using, cinnamon and salt until well combined.

dry crisp topping ingredients in bowl

Use your hands to help form clumps. 

crisp topping in glass bowl with spatula

Assembly: Scrape peach mixture into prepared pan. Scatter the topping evenly over the fruit.

peach crisp filling in square baking dish partially covered with crisp topping

I like to set the pan on a half-sheet pan to catch drips.

square dish of peach crisp placed on half-sheet pan to catch drips
Place baking dish on a sheet pan to catch drips while baking.

Bake for about 30 to 35 minutes or until filling is bubbly and topping is golden brown.

Baked peach crisp, fresh out of oven

Let sit for 5 minutes before serving. We like to cool it on a rack.

Baked peach crisp on cooling rack

The Low FODMAP Peach Crisp may be served warm, at room temperature, or re-warmed after cooling and is best the day it is made. You can store it at room temperature lightly covered with foil overnight, but the topping will lose a bit of its crispness. 

Close Up of Low FODMAP peach crisp on white plate with floral napkins and silver spoons

More Crisp & Peach Recipes

Whether you are a peach fan, or a crisp fan, we’ve got even more recipes for you.

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

  • Butter: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested butter. Monash states that a low FODMAP Green Light portion is 1 tablespoon or 19 g and also states that “butter is high in fat and does not contain carbohydrates (FODMAPs)”. FODMAP Friendly gives it a “Pass” at 1 tablespoon or 19 g. Both recommended serving sizes are presented as part of healthy eating guidelines, not as maximum FODMAP serving size. Fat can affect guy motility and trigger IBS symptoms in some people. Eat to your tolerance.
  • Ginger: Monash University has lab tested fresh ginger root and has determined it to be free of FODMAPs, making it one of our go-to no FODMAP foods.
  • Lemon Juice: Monash University has lab tested lemon juice and it is low FODMAP in ½ cup (125 g) amounts.
  • Oats: Both Monash and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested oats. FODMAP Friendly gives rolled oats a “Pass” at  ½ cup or 43 g servings. Monash has several app entries, and some are country specific. Here we present their “basic” app entries which are not country specific (use your app to look up the other entries). For their main entry called “rolled oats” they say a Green Light low FODMAP serving is ½ cup, which they peg at 52 g. For “quick oats” they state that a low FODMAP serving is only ¼ cup at 23 g, becoming moderate Yellow Light at ½ cup or 47 g. 
  • Pecans: Monash and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested pecans. Monash says that a low FODMAP serving size is 10 pecan halves or 20g. The small print tells us that they are not High FODMAP until they reach a 100 g serving size, or about 40 halves. You might notice that on the FODMAP Friendly app the image is for pecans in the shell. We have asked FODMAP Friendly for clarification and they told us that the ¼ cup (30 g) low FODMAP serving size is for nuts OUT of the shell and is approximately 15 pecan halves.
  • Sugar: Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested white, granulated sugar. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving size of white sugar is ¼ cup (50 g). FODMAP Friendly simply states that they have tested 1 tablespoon and that it is low FODMAP. Regular granulated white sugar is sucrose, which is a disaccharide made up of equal parts glucose and fructose. Sucrose is broken down and absorbed efficiently in the small intestine. 

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Close Up of Low FODMAP peach crisp on white plate with floral napkins and silver spoons
5 from 2 votes

Low FODMAP Peach Crisp

This recipe for Low FODMAP Peach Crisp has a basic version and one gussied up with ginger and pecans – your choice! Yellow peaches contain sorbitol, and this recipe is recommended for those who have passed their sorbitol Challenge. You are going to love the juicy peach filling and crisp, golden brown, buttery brown sugar oat topping and the whole shebang is super simple to make. Calling all beginner bakers!

Makes: 8 Servings
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 35 minutes
Total Time: 45 minutes
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

Peach Filling:

Crisp Topping:

Preparation:

  1. Position rack in center of oven. Preheat oven to 375°F (190°C). Coat the inside of a ceramic or ovenproof glass 8-inch (20 cm) square baking dish with nonstick spray; set aside.
  2. For the Peach Filling: Toss the peach wedges together in a bowl with sugar, flour, lemon juice, ground ginger if using and a pinch of salt. Set aside to sit while you make the topping.

  3. For the Crisp Topping: Melt the butter in a medium-size microwave-safe mixing bowl in the microwave on low. (Or melt the butter in a small saucepan on your stove top, if you like, then transfer to a medium-size mixing bowl.) Whisk in the brown sugar, then whisk in the flour, oats, pecans if using, cinnamon and salt until well combined. Use your hands to help form clumps.

  4. Assembly: Scrape peach mixture into prepared pan. Scatter the topping evenly over the fruit. I like to set the pan on a half-sheet pan to catch drips. Bake for about 30 to 35 minutes or until filling is bubbly and topping is golden brown. Let sit for 5 minutes before serving. The Low FODMAP Peach Crisp may be served warm, at room temperature, or re-warmed after cooling and is best the day it is made. You can store it at room temperature lightly covered with foil overnight, but the topping will lose a bit of its crispness.

Notes:

I love this warmed for breakfast with a dollop if thick, plain, lactose-free yogurt.

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

Butter: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested butter. Monash states that a low FODMAP Green Light portion is 1 tablespoon or 19 g and also states that “butter is high in fat and does not contain carbohydrates (FODMAPs)”. FODMAP Friendly gives it a “Pass” at 1 tablespoon or 19 g. Both recommended serving sizes are presented as part of healthy eating guidelines, not as maximum FODMAP serving size. Fat can affect guy motility and trigger IBS symptoms in some people. Eat to your tolerance.
Ginger: Monash University has lab tested fresh ginger root and has determined it to be free of FODMAPs, making it one of our go-to no FODMAP foods.
Lemon Juice: Monash University has lab tested lemon juice and it is low FODMAP in ½ cup (125 g) amounts.
Oats: Both Monash and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested oats. FODMAP Friendly gives rolled oats a “Pass” at ½ cup or 43 g servings. Monash has several app entries, and some are country specific. Here we present their “basic” app entries which are not country specific (use your app to look up the other entries). For their main entry called “rolled oats” they say a Green Light low FODMAP serving is ½ cup, which they peg at 52 g. For “quick oats” they state that a low FODMAP serving is only ¼ cup at 23 g, becoming moderate Yellow Light at ½ cup or 47 g.
Pecans: Monash and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested pecans. Monash says that a low FODMAP serving size is 10 pecan halves or 20g. The small print tells us that they are not High FODMAP until they reach a 100 g serving size, or about 40 halves. You might notice that on the FODMAP Friendly app the image is for pecans in the shell. We have asked FODMAP Friendly for clarification and they told us that the ¼ cup (30 g) low FODMAP serving size is for nuts OUT of the shell and is approximately 15 pecan halves.
Sugar: Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested white, granulated sugar. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving size of white sugar is ¼ cup (50 g). FODMAP Friendly simply states that they have tested 1 tablespoon and that it is low FODMAP. Regular granulated white sugar is sucrose, which is a disaccharide made up of equal parts glucose and fructose. Sucrose is broken down and absorbed efficiently in the small intestine.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Course: Dessert
Cuisine: American

Nutrition

Calories: 394kcal | Carbohydrates: 59g | Protein: 4g | Fat: 18g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 2g | Monounsaturated Fat: 3g | Sodium: 36mg | Potassium: 33mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 26g | Vitamin A: 4IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 6mg | Iron: 1mg

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.