Recipes | Sauces, Salsas & Condiments

Raw Low FODMAP Cranberry Orange Relish

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This is a spiced Raw Low FODMAP Cranberry Orange Relish made with fresh cranberries, orange zest and pulp, pineapple and honey and spiced with cinnamon, ginger, cardamom and cloves. It makes a great compliment to cooked cranberry sauces (why not have two?) and we love it with poultry and pork, especially.

overhead low FODMAP Raw Cranberry Relish in square glass bowl
We love offering this raw relish alongside a cooked cranberry sauce.

It is best if made one day ahead as the flavor improves tremendously.

Dump & Mix

You do need a food processor for this recipe as you will be grating fresh raw cranberries as well as a whole orange, skin and all. Once that is done you are simply stirring all the ingredients together, making this a very easy cranberry relish recipe.

Frequently Asked Questions

Are Cranberries Low FODMAP?

Both fresh and dried cranberries have low FODMAP serving sizes. We have discussed this in-depth in our Explore An Ingredient: Cranberries, which we suggest you review.
 
This recipe uses fresh cranberries, and as always, if you stick with our suggested serving size, you will be low FODMAP diet compliant.
 

Is Honey Low FODMAP?

Honey contains fructose, however, it has been lab tested did by Monash university and 1 teaspoon can be considered low fodmap.

Is Pineapple Low FODMAP?

Monash University has lab tested fresh pineapple, as well as canned and dried. This recipe takes advantage of canned pineapple in juice; do not buy the kind in sugar syrup.
 
Monash University lab testing tells us that canned pineapple packed in juice is low FODMAP in 90 g servings.

Are Walnuts Low FODMAP?

Some nuts are low FODMAP, and some are not. Thankfully walnuts can be enjoyed even during the Elimination Phase. 10 walnut halves, or 30 g of walnuts, are low FODMAP.

How To Make Our Raw Relish

Fit your food processor with a medium-sized shredding disk. Shred the raw cranberries and the whole orange, skin and pulp.

Scrape mixture into a mixing bowl. Stir in remaining ingredients, pack into an airtight container and refrigerate overnight. 

adding spices and nuts to raw cranberry relish

Will keep for up to a week, but best eaten within 3 days. Serve with turkey, chicken or pork – or even mixed with goat cheese as a spread.

If your shredding disc is not that efficient and you end up with large chunks of orange and/or cranberry leftover after shredding, simply insert the metal blade and process until you have nice even pieces. 

vertical image of low FODMAP Raw Cranberry Relish in square glass bowl
This raw relish is juicy, with a little crunch. Tangy and just sweet enough.

You could eat this right away, but this recipe really demonstrates how flavors can meld and come together after a bit of a rest. This relish does improve with a sit in the refrigerator overnight. Try the relish right after you make it, then let it rest and try it again – I think you will taste an improvement. 

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

  • Cranberries: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested cranberries. FODMAP Friendly has lab tested dried cranberries and gives them a “Fail” at 40 g or ⅜ cup. On the Monash app you will find Dried Cranberries are given a Green Light low FODMAP serving of 1 Australian tablespoon, or 15 g. On the Monash website itself they discuss fresh cranberries and state that 130 grams fresh, which is about a scant 1 ¼ cups, should be tolerated well.
  • Honey: Honey has been lab tested by both FODMAP Friendly and Monash University. FODMAP Friendly gives it a “Fail” at 2 teaspoons (15 g). Monash says that while clover honey specifically is only low FODMAP at ½ teaspoon (3 g), they state that honey is low FODMAP in 1 teaspoon (7 g) amounts.
  • Pineapple: Monash and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested pineapple. Monash lab tests deem 1 cup fresh, chopped pineapple at 140 g to be Green Light low FODMAP. FODMAP Friendly give it a “Pass” at 1 cup (150 g). Monash has lab tested both syrup packed and juice packed canned pineapple and their low FODMAP amounts are nearly identical. Canned pineapple packed in juice, drained, is low FODMAP in 90 g servings. Canned pineapple packed in syrup, drained, is low FODMAP in 84 g servings. Monash has also tested dried pineapple and they have not determined a low FODMAP amount. It is Moderate at 25 g for fructans.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

overhead low FODMAP Raw Cranberry Relish in square glass bowl
5 from 1 vote

Raw Low FODMAP Cranberry Orange Relish

This is a spiced Raw Low FODMAP Cranberry Orange Relish made with fresh cranberries, orange zest and pulp, pineapple and honey and spiced with cinnamon, ginger, cardamom and cloves. It makes a great compliment to cooked cranberry sauces (why not have two?) and we love it with poultry and pork, especially.

Low FODMAP Serving Size Info: Makes about 3 cups (about 610 g); 12 servings; about ¼ cup (about 51 g) per serving

Makes: 12 Servings
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

Preparation:

  1. Fit your food processor with a medium-sized shredding disk. Shred the raw cranberries and the whole orange, skin and pulp. Scrape mixture into a mixing bowl. Stir in remaining ingredients, pack into an airtight container and refrigerate overnight.
  2. Will keep for up to a week, but best eaten within 3 days. Serve with turkey, chicken or pork – or even mixed with goat cheese as a spread.
  3. If your shredding disc is not that efficient and you end up with large chunks of orange and/or cranberry leftover after shredding, simply insert the metal blade and process until you have nice even pieces.
  4. You could eat this right away, but this recipe really demonstrates how flavors can meld and come together after a bit of a rest. This relish does improve with a sit in the refrigerator overnight. Try the relish right after you make it, then let it rest and try it again – I think you will taste an improvement.

Notes:

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

Cranberries: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested cranberries. FODMAP Friendly has lab tested dried cranberries and gives them a “Fail” at 40 g or ⅜ cup. On the Monash app you will find Dried Cranberries are given a Green Light low FODMAP serving of 1 Australian tablespoon, or 15 g. On the Monash website itself they discuss fresh cranberries and state that 130 grams fresh, which is about a scant 1 ¼ cups, should be tolerated well.

Honey: Honey has been lab tested by both FODMAP Friendly and Monash University. FODMAP Friendly gives it a “Fail” at 2 teaspoons (15 g). Monash says that while clover honey specifically is only low FODMAP at ½ teaspoon (3 g), they state that honey is low FODMAP in 1 teaspoon (7 g) amounts.

Pineapple: Monash and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested pineapple. Monash lab tests deem 1 cup fresh, chopped pineapple at 140 g to be Green Light low FODMAP. FODMAP Friendly give it a “Pass” at 1 cup (150 g). Monash has lab tested both syrup packed and juice packed canned pineapple and their low FODMAP amounts are nearly identical. Canned pineapple packed in juice, drained, is low FODMAP in 90 g servings. Canned pineapple packed in syrup, drained, is low FODMAP in 84 g servings. Monash has also tested dried pineapple and they have not determined a low FODMAP amount. It is Moderate at 25 g for fructans.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: American

Nutrition

Calories: 64kcal | Carbohydrates: 12g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 2g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 1mg | Potassium: 8mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 9g | Vitamin A: 1IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 2mg | Iron: 1mg

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.