Lifestyle | Health & Wellness

Low FODMAP Garlic & Onion Substitutes

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We love garlic and onions – of all sorts, from white, yellow and red onions, to shallots, leeks, scallions, chives, you name it – but they don’t love us back. Possibly one of the first things you learn when you are introduced to the low FODMAP diet is that garlic and many types of alliums (onions) are high is fructans and off-limits. Panic sets in. How are you going to cook? This article on Low FODMAP Garlic & Onion Substitutes shows you how to get all that onion and flavor you crave into your low FODMAP cooking.

a variety of onion and garlic types with the words Low FODMAP Garlic and Onion Substitutes
You CAN have your garlic and onion flavor and keep IBS triggers at bay.

We get it! Have no fear – this article is all about Low FODMAP Garlic & Onion Substitutes that are appropriate even for the Elimination Phase. You CAN have your garlic and onion flavor and keep IBS triggers at bay.

All of the information in this article is based upon lab tested, evidence based science from Monash University and FODMAP Friendly.

Table Of Contents
  1. Garlic & Onion Background FAQs
  2. Frequently Asked Questions
  3. Garlic-Infused Oil, Butter & Ghee
  4. Scallions & Green Onions
  5. Chives & Asian Chives
  6. Leeks
  7. Fresh Garlic Scapes
  8. Asafetida
  9. Prepared Low FODMAP Garlic & Onion Products
  10. The Takeaway

Garlic & Onion Background FAQs

Garlic & Black Garlic

Monash University las lab tested both conventional garlic and black garlic and both have lab tested as high FODMAP. For a deeper dive into this beloved cooking ingredient, please refer to our article, Explore An Ingredient: Garlic.

head of black garlic on right
Black garlic is truly black, seen on the right.

FODMAP Friendly has lab tested conventional garlic as well and found no serving, however small, to be low FODMAP. Even at 1 clove that weighs 5 g, fructans were at 343% and fructose at 100%. Please read our article on How To Use The FODMAP Friendly App to learn more about these percentages.

White Onions, Yellow Onions, Red Onions & Shallots

white onions in baskets
These are white onions.

White onions have been lab tested by Monash University and even a small 12 g serving is moderate for FODMAPs (fructans).

yellow onions in a pile
These are yellow onions, also called “brown” onions.

Yellow/brown onions have been lab tested by FODMAP Friendly. A 26 g serving is low FODMAP, but they become high FODMAP quickly at 30 g.

Monash University has lab tested red onions, also called Spanish onions and no low FODMAP serving size has been found.

pile of shallots
Shallots are very oval in shape; their skins and flesh can be very red or just have hints of color as seen here.

Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested shallots and no low FODMAP serving size has been found.

Scallion, Green Onion and Spring Onion Nomenclature

Onions of all sorts are part of the allium genus, of which there are many members, including leeks, garlic, chives. Monash University lists spring onions and scallions as the same thing, but they are not considered the same in every part of the world. In the UK and Canada, and apparently Australia, they are all Allium fistulosum.

scallions on the left and Spring onions on the right against a dark surface
Scallions are on the LEFT. Spring onions are on the RIGHT.

In the U.S., scallions and green onions are considered the same thing, but spring onions are a different variety of allium. Our spring onions are a variety that grows a pronounced bulb, as seen in the image below.

spring onion against dark background
A gorgeous Spring Onion, a variety of green onion.

Since we know that different varieties of produce can have vastly different FODMAP content (just look at bananas, peppers, cabbage, to name a few), we suggest tucking this knowledge away, sticking with just the green parts of these vegetables, and assessing your own tolerance.

BTW, spring onions are also known as Welsh onion, Japanese bunching onion, bunching onion, and long green onion.

spring onions
You can often find Spring onions at farmers markets.

Leeks

Leeks, Allium ampeloprasum var. porrum, look like big scallions and have a mild oniony flavor. Please jump to the Leek section below for information on how much you can eat during Elimination and how to prep them. Here they are below:

Leek greens
Try to find leeks with plenty of green to work with, as shown above.

Ramps

Ramps (Allium tricoccum) have not been lab tested for FODMAPs. They are wild onions native to North America with broad flat leaves, a purplish stem, and a slender bulb akin to a scallion, as seen below.

bunch of ramps
Ramps have broad, flat green leaves that look very different from scallions.

Frequently Asked Questions

Why Can’t I Eat Garlic And Onion On The Low FODMAP Diet?

First of all, we know this is the question that is typically asked, but we want to clarify that it is recommended that garlic and onion be avoided during the first, brief Elimination stage of the 3-stage low FODMAP diet. The Elimination stage is an average of 4 weeks.

Fructans, which are part of the “O” (oligosaccharides) in the acronym FODMAP, are found in garlic, onions, as well as wheat, oats, many vegetables as well as other ingredients. They are also the FODMAP that statistically trigger IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) symptoms the most 

Oligosaccharides are not absorbed by humans whether they have IBS or not because we lack the enzymes needed to break the bonds between the chains that make up these molecules. Instead of being absorbed and used as fuel, oligosaccharides travel through the small intestine to the large intestine where they are fermented by bacteria, which leads to IBS symptoms.

I Have IBS, Do I Need To Avoid Garlic And Onion Forever? 

Not necessarily. During the Elimination Phase we are avoiding/greatly reducing the amount of FODMAPs we are ingesting – including those pesky fructans. This allows our digestive system to calm down and to provide a clean slate, as it were, for the Challenge Phase ahead. One of the things we see again and again is folks not conducting a well-structured Elimination and Challenge Phase. Note that we said “structured” and not “strict”. Some people do better with a Gentle Diet approach, but any which way, it should be structured so that you are gathering real data about how you react to foods. 

Many people find that eventually they can bring garlic and/or onion back into their diet, in certain amounts, and not trigger IBS symptoms. 

Garlic-Infused Oil, Butter & Ghee

What is Garlic-Infused Oil? 

True garlic-infused oil is made from steeping fresh garlic in oil (any kind of pure oil, even avocado). Our recipe for Low FODMAP Garlic-Infused Oil suggests very gently heating the garlic and oil – and not simmering, which we believe creates an acrid taste. All of the garlic solids are then removed from the oil, and you are left with “garlic-infused oil”. The same technique can be used for onions, and you can even combine garlic and onions.

Plump and firm garlic clove heads in front of bottles of garlic infused oil. Monash University Certified Low FODMAP Recipe for Garlic-Infused Oil
Making true garlic-infused oil is easy!

The fructans in garlic and onion are water soluble, but not oil soluble. Their flavor remains in the oil, but without any FODMAPs. There are several “garlic-infused” oils that have been lab tested and certified, and you can also read labels.

Is Garlic-Infused Oil Low FODMAP?

Not all “garlic-infused” oils are low FODMAP. Note the use of the quotes. This is because many– probably the majority – of prepared flavored oils on the market that call themselves infused, are not actually infused.

Infusing is a technical culinary term, but it is also a word used to describe things that are enhanced by something else. Like, one might say, the room was infused with a lovely fragrance. When it comes to food, infusing an oil would take place as described in the above section.

Many prepared flavored oils calling themselves “infused” use natural garlic flavoring, essential oils and even artificial flavors to lend the garlic flavor to the oil. Some of these might be low FODMAP and some might not be. Then there are those that still have garlic bits within the bottle; steer clear of those.

If you stick with lab tested and certified products, such as Fody Garlic Infused Olive Oil and their Fody Shallot Infused Olive Oil you will have assurance.

How Can I Make Garlic-Infused Oil?

We have the best Low FODMAP Garlic-Infused Oil recipe. It is simple, yields excellent results, and you can even vary the garlic strength by increasing or decreasing the amount of garlic that you use. Our recipe assumes that you want to make a big batch and store it.

What if you have none at hand and need it? There is another way to make low FODMAP garlic-infused oil on the fly. Simply add oil to your pot, add your roughly chopped garlic, and sauté for a few minutes. Remove all the garlic solids and you are ready to make your chosen dish.

Can I Make Low FODMAP Garlic-Infused Oil With Any Oil?

Yes, you can make Low FODMAP Garlic-Infused Oil with any pure oil – canola, olive, sunflower, avocado, peanut, coconut, etc.

Can I Make Garlic-Infused Butter?

Butter contains about 15% to 18% water; the fructans in garlic are water soluble, so they could leach into the melted butter. We do not recommend using butter.

Can I Make Garlic-Infused Ghee?

Water is removed from butter when making ghee, but there is no way to know if you have removed all of the water content. We advise against this.

Where Can I Find Garlic-Infused Oil? 

Of course, you can make your own and we think our garlic version and onion version are exemplary. If you want to purchase, we have two articles for you to read, one with several brand recommendations and one diving deep into how not all “infused” oils are created equal. Here we will simply give you our favorite lab tested and certified low FODMAP recommendations and one, that while it is not lab tested, is low FODMAP and is our favorite vegetable oil based.

By the way, we suggest you keep olive oil based and vegetable oil based infused oils on hand, because they each have their preferred usages.

Lab tested certified low FODMAP flavored oils:

The following are not lab tested or certified, but they are low FODMAP.

If you buy prepared flavored oils, they will be safe for consumption. They will have preservatives added, such as citric acid, or the garlic itself might have been acidified during the preparation process, and/or they are pasteurized upon bottling.

The danger with homemade infused oils is the risk of botulism poisoning, which can occur if freshly made infused oils are not handled properly. You will see in our Low FODMAP Garlic-Infused Oil recipe and our Low FODMAP Onion-Infused Oil recipe that we suggest storing in the refrigerator and using within 3 days or freeze for longer storage. These directions are based on governmental safety guidelines, and we stick to them. 

Yes, we have heard all the stories about folks letting garlic steep in oil for days and days at room temp on the windowsill and the like, and no one ever getting sick. But there is the chance of bacterial growth; why risk it? You have enough going on with your gut!

How Do I Use Garlic-Infused Oil? And Onion-Infused oil?

So many recipes call for heating oil in a pan, adding garlic and/or onions and then going on to make your recipe, adding vegetables, proteins and grains; this approach would yield a high FODMAP result as ANY additional ingredients other than the pure oil do have a water content. Fructans, being water soluble will leach into the dish. You CANNOT just fish out the garlic and onions later after you have made your dish.

You can make your recipe simply by starting with garlic-infused oil or onion-infused-oil and proceeding to great, and very similar, results.

Scallions & Green Onions

Are Scallions Low FODMAP? Are Green Onions Low FODMAP?

Scallions, also called green onions, do have low FODMAP portions. Monash University lab testing found no FODMAPs detected in scallion greens; they suggest a 75 g serving size. FODMAP Friendly has also lab tested scallions: their recommended serving size for the green parts is 16 g, with a max low FODMAP serving of 161 g. They have also tested the bulb and it is low FODMAP in 19 g portions, which is about 2 tablespoons finely chopped.

many bunches of scallions
Look for scallions with moist firm leaves and if they have fresh looking roots like the ones here, all the better. These are very fresh.

How Do I Use Green Onion Tops? How Do I Use Scallion Greens?

Whether you call them scallions or green onions, scallion greens or tops, it is very easy to use the green parts to add onion flavor to your low FODMAP cooking. Simply rinse with cool water, dry and chop. They can be used any way you would have used onions in your pre-FODMAP days. Sauté them; use raw as garnish, etc. 

Oftentimes if a recipe calls for ½ cup of chopped onion, I will instead use ½ cup (32 g) of chopped scallion greens.

Place the white bulb in water to re-grow the greens!

How Do I Use Scallion Bulb?

FODMAP Friendly has lab tested scallion bulbs and they are low FODMAP in 19 g portions. This is about 2 tablespoons finely chopped. Use as you would white or yellow onion!

Where Do I Find Scallions and Green Onions, And How Do I Select Them? 

Scallions can be found year-round in most grocery stores and at farmers markets in the summertime. They are also easy to grow, so that is a consideration. They come in bunches; choose ones with bright green, perky tops with no signs if wilting or flabbiness. The bulb should look plump and the roots at the end of the bulb should have no sliminess.

How Do You Store Green Onion Tops? 

We don’t recommend that you do. We think scallion store best, whole. You can stand them up in a glass filled with about 1-inch (2.5 cm) of water, then cover the greens loosely with a plastic bag, or wrap in a damp (not wet) paper towel and store in vegetable drawer.

Separate the greens from the bulb right when you need them.

How Do You Re-Grow Green Onions?

It is easy to re-grow the green tops, once you have used them. We have full directions in our article, Grow Your Scallions In A Glass! 

Scallions in water in a glass regrowing
After trimming your greens, place the bulbs with roots in a glass of water to re-grow the greens.

It works for a while, but we do find that the greens are not quite the same as when first purchased and used. Planting, or replanting, in soil, which has more nutrients than water, often gives better results.

Chives & Asian Chives

Are Chives Low FODMAP? 

chives growing in a pot
Chives are easy to grow and will come up year after year.

Are Freeze-Dried Chives Low FODMAP?

Did you know that it is easy to find freeze-dried chives in the herb and spice section of the supermarket? It is a way to have them always on hand, but are they low FODMAP?

Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly freeze-dry the great majority of the foods they test, prior to testing. It is believed that freeze-drying (but not simple drying) very minimally disrupts FODMAP content, if at all. You can read more in our Monash University Lab Testing Explained article and the FODMAP Friendly Lab Testing Explained companion piece.

How Do I Use Chives? 

Chives have a subtle onion flavor and can be used raw or cooked any place you might want onion flavor. Check out our Low FODMAP Ranch Dressing for a great use of chives.

Where Do I Find Chives? 

If available, chives will be in your produce section of the supermarket. They are also very easy to grow and as a perennial, will come up year after year, in the ground and they also make a great potted herb. 

chives in dirt on white background-2
Here you can see the roots of chives. They are a very slender allium.

How Do I Store Chives? 

If you have purchased them pre-packaged in a plastic blister-pack style container (very common in the U.S.) from the market, keep them in there and use up within a few days. If they are trimmed and fresh, roll up unwashed chives in a very lightly dampened paper towel and place in a plastic bag, which you will seal. Refrigerate for up to 1 week. Keep an eye on them. If they start wilting, use right away.

Are Asian Chives Low FODMAP? Are Garlic Chives Low FODMAP?

Yes, Asian chives are low FODMAP, and sometimes called garlic chives. Monash University recommends an 80 g serving size; please note that their image does include the closed flower buds. 

A lot of Asian chives, close up
Asian chives, also called garlic chives, often have blossoms attached.

How Do I Use Asian Chives? 

Asian chives have a subtle garlic flavor and can be used raw or cooked any place you might want garlic flavor. They usually come with a tight flower bud attached to the top and you can chop that along with the stem. Try them in a stir-fry.

Where Do I Find Asian Chives? 

Of course it will depend on where you live. For us we have to go to a store specializing in Asian ingredients that also has fresh produce.

How Do I Store Asian Chives? 

In our markets they usually come trimmed away from their root and wrapped in plastic wrap. Refrigerated in the vegetable drawer, we usually get about 1 week out of them.

Leeks

Are Leeks Low FODMAP? 

Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested leeksgreens (leaves) and bulbs. Monash University recommends a low FODMAP serving size of 100 g for the greens, and 14 g for the bulb. FODMAP Friendly suggests a serving size of leek greens of 37 g, with a low FODMAP max serve of 83 g. Their recommended low FODMAP leek bulb amount is 46 g.

leeks on dark mottled background
These leeks have a medium amount of greens. Sometimes they have much less; sometimes more.

Where Can I Find Leeks And How Do I Select Them? 

You can find fresh leeks in most supermarket produce sections, but, and this is a big caveat, some markets seem to stock them with lots of greens intact – great for us FODMAPers – and other markets have trimmed them all away. You will have to survey the markets close to you. You will have a better chance at finding them with greens attached at farmers markets.

The bulbs should be plump with no hint of sliminess or withering. The greens should be stiff, also with no signs of withering, browning or floppiness.

How Do I Prepare Leeks? 

Wash the leeks well, and then dry. We have a photo for you below that shows where the leek greens and bulb portion meet. To chop the leaves, we suggest that you do so very finely, as they can be tough. As you get into the bulb portion there can be a lot of sandy dirt trapped within, so we usually halve the bulb lengthwise, or even quarter, and the dirt will be easier to see, then wash the dirt out.

Leek greens cutting line
This is where we usually separate the greens from the rest of the leek.

How Do I Use Leek Leaves? 

How Do I Use Leek Bulb? 

Leek bulb is low FODMAP in small portions of 46 g. Volume wise it will depend on how finely (or not) that you chop them. Use as you would yellow or white onion, cooked or raw.

Fresh Garlic Scapes

What Are Garlic Scapes?

Garlic scapes are the shoots that sprout from the tops of garlic bulbs.

Are Garlic Scapes Low FODMAP?

Yes, garlic scapes are low FODMAP. On the Monash University app, they are called “garlic shoots”. They have been lab tested and fresh garlic scapes/shoots have a low FODMAP serving size of 30 g or about 6 Australian tablespoons. They quickly become Moderate for fructose and fructans at 40 g.

Where Can I Find Fresh Garlic Scapes?

We only see them at farmers markets or in friend’s gardens. Make friends with your gardening neighbors!

Fresh_Garlic_scapes on wooden board
These are fresh garlic scapes, usually only found in farmers markets.

How Do I Use Fresh Garlic Scapes?

You can chop fresh garlic scapes, similarly to the way you would prep scallion greens, and use them fresh or raw in your chosen recipes.

onion sprouting
Onions can sprout shoots, as seen here. Their FODMAP content is unknown.

Can I Eat Onion Shoots?

Onion shoots, which are the green shoots that emerge from the tops of onions, and might seem similar to garlic scapes/shoots, have not been lab tested and should be treated as such. Read our article, What If A Food Hasn’t Been Lab Tested For FODMAPs?

Asafetida

What Is Asafetida? 

Also spelled “asafoetida” as it is on the Monash University app, this is a dried gum extracted from ferula, which is an herb related to celery; asafetida is also called “hing”. It is used as a spice or flavoring agent, very commonly found in Indian cooking. Note that its smell is quite pungent, but once used in a cooked dish, it mellows out and provides an oniony garlicky flavor.

asafetida jar and pile of the powder with measuring spoon

Is Asafetida Low FODMAP? 

Yes, asafetida powder is low FODMAP. It has been lab tested by Monash University and the recommended serving size is 2 g, or ¼ teaspoon. Please note that some asafetida is packaged with an amount of wheat flour. Monash has not disclosed whether the kind tested contained wheat, or not. The low FODMAP diet is not a wheat free diet but at the very least consider hing to contain wheat and gluten, so it is not recommended for celiacs.

Is Asafoetida Safe To Eat? 

Asafetida is considered safe to eat for most people, however, there is some evidence that larger amounts can have a negative effect on those who are pregnant. Best to avoid at those times. Please consult your doctor or RD before consuming, if pregnant or trying to become pregnant.

How Do I Use Asafetida? 

Best results are achieved if you bloom a small amount in warm oil, as you would with curry powder. Then you can go on to make your dish, adding other ingredients. Do not be put off by the pungent smell when raw; it will mellow out when cooked.

Prepared Low FODMAP Garlic & Onion Products

We mentioned prepared infused oils above, but will mention here again, along with other products that will bring onion and garlic flavor to your low FODMAP cooking. Those that are lab tested and certified low FODMAP are labeled as such. 

A hand with a teaspoon filled with green powder above a jar of opened Garlic Scape Powder on a white backgroun

What Is Garlic Scape Powder?

Garlic Scape Powder has been brought to market by Gourmend, a company specializing in low FODMAP products. It is a very pure product and is made from ground dehydrated and dried garlic scapes.

Is Garlic Scape Powder Low FODMAP?

Gourmend Garlic Scape Powder has been lab tested and certified low FODMAP by Monash University in serving sizes of ¼ teaspoon or .3 g. Larger serving sizes of .6 g or more contain high FOMDAP amounts of fructans.

What Does Garlic Scape Powder Taste Like?

Gourmend Garlic Scape Powder has a mild garlic flavor.

How Do I Use Garlic Scape Powder?

The makers of Gourmend Garlic Scape Powder suggest incorporating the powder into cooked dishes, as opposed to using it raw. Use as you would any other dried herb or spice.

Where Can I Buy Garlic Scape Powder?

We have Gourmend Garlic Scape Powder available in our store and you can also go directly to their website.

Can I Make Garlic Scape Powder?

You could dry garlic scapes and grind them to a powder but there is no way to know if your result would be low FODMAP. Processing of all sorts, including dehydrating, drying, freeze-drying, etc. can dramatically alter FODMAPs and there is no way to know FODMAP content without lab testing.

What Is Garlic Chive Powder?

Garlic Chive Powder has been brought to market by Gourmend, a company specializing in low FODMAP products. It is a very pure product and is made from ground dehydrated and dried garlic chives.

Is Garlic Chive Powder Low FODMAP?

Gourmend Garlic Chive Powder has been lab tested and certified low FODMAP by Monash University in serving sizes of ¼ teaspoon or .5 g. Always bear in mind that serving sizes are connected to government guidelines and do not necessarily indicate that this is the upper level for FODMAP intake. Always check the small print in the Monash University Low FODMAP Diet app; in this case it states that “only trace amounts of FODMAPs were detected” in this product, and to “eat freely and according to appetite”.

What Does Garlic Chive Powder Taste Like?

Gourmend Garlic Chive Powder has a mild onion flavor.

How Do I Use Garlic Chive Powder?

The makers of Gourmend Garlic Chive Powder suggest incorporating the powder into cooked dishes, as opposed to using it raw. Use as you would any other dried herb or spice.

Where Can I Buy Garlic Chive Powder?

We have Gourmend Garlic Chive Powder available in our store and you can also go directly to their website.

Can I Make Garlic Chive Powder?

You could dry garlic chives and grind them to a powder but there is no way to know if your result would be low FODMAP. Processing of all sorts, including dehydrating, drying, freeze-drying, etc. can dramatically alter FODMAPs and there is no way to know FODMAP content without lab testing.

What Is Green Onion Powder?

Green Onion Powder has been brought to market by Gourmend, a company specializing in low FODMAP products. It is a very pure product and is made from ground dehydrated and dried green onion tops/leaves.

All of Gourmend Foods products lined up together against a white background
Gourmend makes a fantastic Chicken Broth, too. Try it!

Is Green Onion Powder Low FODMAP?

Gourmend Green Onion Powder has been lab tested and certified low FODMAP by Monash University in serving sizes of ¼ teaspoon or .4 g. 

What Does Green Onion Powder Taste Like?

Gourmend Green Onion Powder has a mild onion flavor.

How Do I Use Green Onion Powder?

The makers of Gourmend Green Onion Powder suggest incorporating the powder into cooked dishes, as opposed to using it raw. Use as you would any other dried herb or spice.

Where Can I Buy Green Onion Powder?

We have Gourmend Green Onion Powder available through Amazon and you can also go directly to their website.

Can I Make Green Onion Powder?

You could dry green onion tops and grind them to a powder but there is no way to know if your result would be low FODMAP. Processing of all sorts, including dehydrating, drying, freeze-drying, etc. can dramatically alter FODMAPs and there is no way to know FODMAP content without lab testing.

Is Garlic Powder Low FODMAP?

Conventional garlic powder, made from dried/dehydrated garlic, is high FODMAP.

Is Onion Powder Low FODMAP?

Conventional onion powder, made from dried/dehydrated onion, is high FODMAP.

What Is Low FODMAP Garlic Powder?

There are dry, granular products on the market that are very similar to conventional garlic powder, but they are low FODMAP. The conventional kind is made from dried/dehydrated garlic that has been finely ground to a powder and is high FODMAP.

The low FODMAP versions are made from maltodextrin and natural garlic flavor. The FreeFod Garlic Replacer is lab tested and certified low FODMAP by FODMAP Friendly. The Fodmazing Garlic Replacer Substitute contains the same ingredients but is not certified; it is also much less expensive. These low FODMAP garlic powders have been game changers for us, and we use them as we would conventional garlic powder, with one caveat. They tend to clump if added to fat or oil, so best dissolved in water-based ingredients.

What Is Low FODMAP Onion Powder?

There are dry, granular products on the market that are very similar to conventional onion powder, but they are low FODMAP. The conventional kind is made from dried/dehydrated onion that has been finely ground to a powder and is high FODMAP.

The low FODMAP versions are made from maltodextrin and natural onion flavor. The FreeFod Onion Replacer is lab tested and certified low FODMAP by FODMAP Friendly. The Fodmazing Onion Replacer Substitute contains the same ingredients but is not certified; it is also much less expensive. These low FODMAP onion powders have been game changers for us, and we use them as we would conventional onion powder, with one caveat. They tend to clump if added to fat or oil, so best dissolved in water-based ingredients.

Is Garlic Salt Low FODMAP?

Conventional garlic salt is high FODMAP and contains dried/dehydrated garlic.

Is Onion Salt Low FODMAP?

Conventional onion salt is high FODMAP and contains dried/dehydrated onion.

What Is Low FODMAP Garlic Salt?

Smoke ‘n Sanity has a product called Essence of Garlic Salt that is lab tested and certified low FODMAP by Monash University. It contains salt, modified corn starch, natural flavors and the label notes that is “Contains: Alliums”.

Line up of all of the Smoke N Sanity products
Smoke ‘n Sanity has many seasoning products in addition to their Essence of Garlic Salt and Essence of Onion Salt shown in the center.

What Is Low FODMAP Onion Salt?

Smoke ‘n Sanity has a product called Essence of Onion Salt that is lab tested and certified low FODMAP by Monash University. It contains salt, modified corn starch, natural flavors and the label notes that is “Contains: Alliums”.

Are Pickled Onions Low FODMAP?

Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested larger pickled onions, as well as small. It is thought that the fructans, which are water soluble, leach into the pickling liquid, so we recommend eating the pickled onions drained. 

Monash University lab testing shows large onions pickled in vinegar to have a low FODMAP serving size of 45 g, or about 2 onions. Serving sizes over 80 g will be high in fructans. They sourced small pickled onions in Germany and no low FODMAP serving size was found; even at 28 g they were high in fructose.

FODMAP Friendly lab testing showed larger pickled onions to be low FODMAP in 30 g portions, with a low FODMAP max serving size of 43 g. Small pickled onions were shown to be low FODMAP in 30 g portions with a low FODMAP max serving size of 58 g. 

The Takeaway

No need to go without garlic or onion flavor while following the low FODMAP diet. There are many fresh and prepared garlic and onion flavored ingredients that you can use in your low FODMAP cooking, even during the Elimination Phase.

Educate yourself to all of the fresh items available, such as chopped scallion and leek greens, as well as the small amounts of bulbs. Chives contain no FODMAPs, and Asian chives have very generous serving sizes, and all of these are easy to find in your supermarket.

Garlic and onion infused oils are a mainstay and can homemade or purchased. Newer to the market are “low FODMAP garlic powder” and low FODMAP onion powder. These can be used similarly to conventional garlic and onion powders but are low FODMAP. The Freefod brand are lab tested and certified low FODMAP by FODMAP Friendly.

We keep scallions growing on our windowsill all year round and several choices of infused oil in our pantry (olive oil based, as well as vegetable oil based) as well as dry, granulated garlic/onion products in our spice drawer and suggest that you do, too.

And remember, the goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eventually eat as broadly as possible without triggering IBS symptoms. When you are in your Challenge Phase, be sure to try garlic, onions and all sorts of alliums to determine what your tolerance is. And if you cannot tolerate them right away, try Challenging yourself again several months down the line; you might be pleasantly surprised.

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