Lifestyle | Food Features

Making Beef Stock

Make Beef Stock at Home

I never knew how much I relied on purchased stocks until they were off limits! By now you are probably aware that pretty much all commercially prepared stocks, whether they are chicken or beef stock, are made with high FODMAP garlic and onion products either from flavorings and/or the raw ingredients themselves.

meaty bones, leek greens and carrots ready to roast for homemade low FODMAP Beef Stock
Meaty bones, leek greens and carrots ready to roast for homemade low FODMAP Beef Stock.

Low-FODMAP versions of prepared chicken and beef stock are beginning to become available but knowing how to make your own should be part of your skill set. Making beef broth might sound daunting – like it should remain within the realm of professional chefs – but it is actually very easy. Just give yourself time – lots of it! We like to simmer our Beef Stock overnight.

Closeup of rich homemade Low FODMAP Beef Stock

Why We Make Beef Stock from Scratch

Prepared stock products typically include onions and garlic because they add depth and complexity of flavor, but we cannot rely on these purchased products because we cannot be assured how the garlic and onions were handled. Most stocks and broths add onions and garlic to the water along with the other ingredients. This allows the fructans to leach into the stock. Luckily the fructans are not oil soluble, so there are ways to incorporate those flavors if we handle everything appropriately.

Our goal is a rich beef stock, so we must adjust our preparation technique. We do this via several alterations.

  • Choosing the Right Bones: We like to use a combination of marrow bones, oxtails, knuckle bones, short ribs and neck bones.
  • Do Not Blanch the Bones: Blanching the bones, which is a classic step for rich, dark meat stocks employed by some chefs to remove impurities, also removes some flavor
  • Umami!: Adding ingredients that are high in umami helps to add flavor that might be missing due to the minimal infusion of onion and garlic. That’s why you will see tomato paste and soy sauce used in our recipe, albeit judiciously.
  • Simmer for Hours: Gently simmering this stock for an extended time will extract the most flavor from your meaty bones.
  • Skim, Strain and Strain Again: We remove impurities by skimming and straining, as opposed to blanching, which allows all of the inherent flavor in the bones to remain intact. A final straining through cheesecloth ensures a clear stock.

By following our Beef Stock recipe employing all of these techniques, you will be rewarded with an incredibly rich, flavorful result.

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