Recipes | Baking

Low FODMAP Chocolate Peanut Butter Pie

GFVEG

This post may contain affiliate links. Please see our disclosure policy for details.

Our Low FODMAP Chocolate Peanut Butter Pie is based upon a recipe from foodandwine.com and brought to our attention by one of our community members. Many recipes for chocolate peanut butter pies are based upon cream cheese; this one differs as the filling is more of a peanut butter pudding. If you are a custard/pudding/creamy texture fan, you are going to love this pie. The crust is a crisp, dark chocolate cookie crust – all low FODMAP, gluten-free and lactose-free.

low FODMAP Chocolate Peanut Butter Pie, dark background; antique plates, silverware and embroidered napkin
Our Low FODMAP Chocolate peanut Butter Pie is also gluten-free and lactose-free.

If you want more of a cheesecake and peanut butter combo, try our Frozen Low FODMAP Peanut Butter Cheesecake.

The original pie recipe mentions that the crust is made from a scratch version of the super dark Nabisco Famous Chocolate Wafers. That recipe had you make cookies, only in order to grind them up for a cookie crust. The idea was that if you couldn’t find the Nabisco Famous Chocolate Wafers at the store, that you could still have the flavor, texture and color they provide by baking a homemade version. First of all, that’s a lot of work. Secondly, those cookies, and the cookie/crust recipe, are high FODMAP anyway.

vertical of Low FODMAP Chocolate Peanut Butter Pie, dark background; antique plates, silverware and embroidered napkin
We use Gluten-Free Oreos to make the crumb crust.

So, what I have done here is use purchased Gluten-Free Oreos! Throw them in the food processor, add a little melted butter and call it a day! Gluten-free and low FODMAP, too. And easy. And fast. No electric mixer needed.

Gluten-Free Oreos Are Low FODMAP

Not only do Gluten-Free Oreos exist, but they are low FODMAP! One package weighs 13.29-ounces (376 grams) and the 24 Oreos that you need for our crust require you to purchase only one package.

You will use about three-quarters of the package.

Gluten free oreo package held in hand
You will only need one 13.29-ounce package of Oreos.

Milk vs. Dark Chocolate Ganache

The original recipe used milk chocolate for the ganache topping. While there is a low FODMAP amount of milk chocolate, we prefer the not-as-sweet complement of dark chocolate in this Low FODMAP Chocolate Peanut Butter Pie.

Read more in:

Peanut Butters Are Not Created Equal

We have an entire article for you on peanut butter – because it is a beloved food, it has a low FODMAP serving size, and there are many different kinds. When it comes to making a sandwich, feel free to use whatever kind you like. But when it comes to recipes, you should use the kind of peanut butter that is suggested in the ingredient list, as subbing one type for another will throw off the results.

When it comes to recipes, you should use the kind of peanut butter that is suggested in the ingredient list, as subbing one type for another will throw off the results.

This recipe uses smooth (or crunchy/chunky) no-stir style peanut butter. The ingredient list should list roasted peanuts, sugar, palm oil and salt. I prefer making this pie with smooth; I happened to only have crunchy/chunky on hand when I made the pie for the images, so you will see a bit of texture in the filling. Both approaches are great, your choice.

Low FODMAP Chocolate Peanut Butter Pie, dark background; antique plates, silverware and embroidered napkin; wedge on plate
Crunchy chocolate cookie crust, creamy peanut butter filling, rich chocolate ganache topping…the extra peanuts and sprinkling of salt make this a dessert to remember.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can I Use A Graham Cracker Crust?

The pie crust is meant to add a deep chocolate flavor and dark, rich color, but you could use a low FODMAP graham cracker crust, if you like. Try with Nairn’s.

Can I Make This With Almond Butter?

We suggest that you do not. First of all, the textures of the nut butters are not the same, also, almond butter has half the low FODMAP serving size that peanut butter does.

Can I Freeze This Pie?

You could made the crust ahead, pat it in the pie plate and place that, very well wrapped, in the freezer for up to one month. I do not suggest that you freeze the prepared pie. The custard filling will suffer.

Can I Use Alt Milk In Lieu Of The Lactose-Free Milk?

This recipe has been developed and tested using lactose-free whole milk. If you would like to use an alt milk, you could try, but I cannot guarantee great results. Also think about flavor. For instance, coconut milk would give the pie a very pronounced coconut flavor.

Can I Melt Chocolate Chips For The Ganache?

Chocolate chips are formulated to hold their shape. They do not always melt well. We suggest you use bulk chocolate, bars or wafers meant for melting.

Let’s Make Low FODMAP Chocolate Peanut Butter Pie

Here are our step-by-step instructions:

Make the Crust: Position rack in middle of oven. Preheat oven to 350°F(180°C). Coat a 9-inch (23 cm) pie pan with nonstick spray.

Place Oreos and salt in bowl of food processor fitted with metal blade.

Gluten free oreos in food processor

Pulse on and off, then leave machine on until cookies are finely ground.

gluten free oreos ground fine in food processor

Drizzle in the melted butter and pulse on and off until evenly moistened.

pressing chocolate cookie crust into pie plate with a flat bottomed measuring cup

Dump mixture into prepared pie plate and press firmly along bottom and sides into an even layer. Use a flat-bottomed measuring cup to help press the crust in, if you like.

Bake for 8 minutes. The crust should feel dry and slightly toasted. Cool on rack while you make filling.

Make the Filling: Place brown sugar, cornstarch and salt in a medium sized saucepan, whisking to combine.

dry ingredients whisked together in pot

Slowly add milk, whisking until smooth.

Making pudding

Then whisk in egg yolks.

adding eggs to pudding

Cook over medium heat, whisking constantly, until mixture bubbles and thickens about 6 to 8 minutes. When mixture is thick and you can see distinct whisk marks, remove from heat.

cooking pudding till thick

Whisk in peanut butter and vanilla until pudding is smooth and all ingredients combined. Immediately scrape filling into crust (which can still be a tad warm).

Pouring peanut butter pudding into crust

Spread filling evenly, smoothing the top.

smoothing top of pudding pie

Let pie stand while you make the ganache topping.

Make the Ganache & Decorate: Melt chocolate and cream together in a small microwave-safe bowl, in microwave, stirring until combined and smooth.

making ganache

You can also do this in top of double boiler on stove. Pour ganache over top of pie them pick up pie and tilt it gently this way and that to encourage the flow of ganache to cover peanut butter filling completely. Use a small, offset icing spatula to facilitate, if needed.

pouring ganache on top of pie

Sprinkle peanuts over pie edges as shows; chill in fridge at least 2 hours, or overnight. Sprinkle peanuts with sea salt right before serving. Serve cold, cut into wedges with a thin, sharp knife.

overhead of low FODMAP chocolate peanut butter pie on marble table

FODMAP Information

All recipes are based upon Monash University & FODMAP Friendly science at time of initial publication.

  • Brown Sugar: Brown sugar has been lab tested by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly. There are many kinds of brown sugar, from cane to beet (to blends) to Muscovado and more, which we discuss in our Explore An Ingredient: Sugar. Unfortunately, there is no information about what kind of brown sugars were lab tested. Monash gives us a low FODMAP amount of ¼ cup or 40 g but no further information. In addition, in private correspondence with Monash University we know that there are amounts larger than 40 g that would be considered low FODMAP. FODMAP Friendly gives us a low FODMAP amount of 13 g. Dark brown Muscovado sugar does appear in a product lab tested and certified low FODMAP by FODMAP Friendly, so we do know there is a low FODMAP amount. 
  • Butter: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested butter. Monash states that a low FODMAP Green Light portion is 1 tablespoon or 19 g and also states that “butter is high in fat and does not contain carbohydrates (FODMAPs)”. FODMAP Friendly gives it a “Pass” at 1 tablespoon or 19 g. Both recommended serving sizes are presented as part of healthy eating guidelines, not as maximum FODMAP serving size. Fat can affect guy motility and trigger IBS symptoms in some people. Eat to your tolerance.
  • Chocolate: Monash University has lab tested dark, milk and white chocolate all have low FODMAP amounts: 85% dark at 20 g; dark at 30 g; milk at 20 g; white at 25 g. FODMAP Friendly has also lab tested dark chocolate, milk and white chocolate. Their lab tests place low FODMAP servings for dark chocolate at 30 g, with a max low FODMAP serving size of 101 g. Milk chocolate is 30 g with a 38 g max serve; white chocolate is also 30 g with a max low FODMAP serve of 38 g.
  • Dairy: The low FODMAP diet is not a dairy-free diet. It is, however, low in lactose. Many dairy ingredients are low in lactose, such as heavy cream and many cheeses.
  • Peanuts: Monash has lab tested peanuts. They are low FODMAP in 28 g amounts, which they say is 32 nuts (but sizes can vary, so go by weight). They state say that only trace amounts of FODMAPs have been found in peanuts.
  • Peanut Butter: Monash and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested peanut butter. We do not have further information as to what kind of peanut butter was tested (unsweetened natural, made with hydrogenated oil and sugar, or no-stir style with palm oil and sugar). Monash shows two entries. We do not know what the images correspond to in terms of type of peanut butter. They state that both are low FODMAP at 2 Australian tablespoons, although one is said to be 50 g and the other 32 g. FODMAP Friendly’s app image shows what looks to be some sort of creamy style (not natural). They give it a “Pass” at 2 tablespoons (50 g), but also state a Max Serve at 6.86 ounces or 192.05 g. It is also important to note that Monash has said peanuts themselves have only trace amounts of FODMAPs and they say that peanut butter only becomes Moderate for fructose at 140 g. If you malabsorb fructose, it might be an issue; for others it might be tolerated very well.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. Foods will be retested from time to time; in the case of raw ingredients, such as fruits and vegetables, results may vary. All lab tested results are valid and represent a snapshot in time. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

More Chocolate & Peanut Low FODMAP Recipes

For more chocolate peanut goodness, check these out:

Send This Recipe to Me!
Enter your email to have this sent to your inbox and we will send you fresh recipes weekly!
By sending this message, I accept FODMAP Everyday’s
Terms and Privacy Policy.
low FODMAP Chocolate Peanut Butter Pie, dark background; antique plates, silverware and embroidered napkin
4 from 2 votes

Low FODMAP Chocolate Peanut Butter Pie

Our Low FODMAP Chocolate Peanut Butter Pie is based upon a recipe from foodandwine.com and brought to our attention by one of our community members. Many recipes for chocolate peanut butter pies are based upon cream cheese; this one differs as the filling is more of a peanut butter pudding. If you are a custard/pudding/creamy texture fan, you are going to love this pie. The crust is a crisp, dark chocolate cookie crust – all low FODMAP, gluten-free and lactose-free.

 Low FODMAP Serving Size Info: Makes 1, 9-inch (23 cm) pie; 14 slices; 1 slice per serving

Makes: 14 Servings
Prep Time: 25 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 45 minutes
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

Crust:

  • 24 Gluten-Free Oreos
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

Filling:

Ganache Topping & Decorations

  • 2- ounces 55 g) semisweet chocolate, such as 55% cacao mass, finely chopped
  • ¼ cup (60 ml) heavy cream, lactose-free if available
  • 1/4 cup (40 g) roasted peanuts, roughly chopped
  • 1/4 teaspoon flaky sea salt, such as Maldon

Preparation:

  1. Make the Crust: Position rack in middle of oven. Preheat oven to 350°F(180°C). Coat a 9-inch (23 cm) pie plate with nonstick spray.

  2. Place Oreos and salt in bowl of food processor fitted with metal blade. Pulse on and off, then leave machine on until cookies are finely ground. Drizzle in the melted butter and pulse on and off until evenly moistened.
  3. Dump mixture into prepared pie plate and press firmly along bottom and sides into an even layer. Use a flat-bottomed measuring cup to help press the crust in, if you like.
  4. Bake for 8 minutes. The crust should feel dry and slightly toasted. Cool on rack while you make filling.
  5. Make the Filling: Place brown sugar, cornstarch and salt in a medium sized saucepan, whisking to combine. Slowly add milk, whisking until smooth, then whisk in egg yolks. Cook over medium heat, whisking constantly, until mixture bubbles and thickens about 6 to 8 minutes. When mixture is thick and you can see distinct whisk marks, remove from heat, and whisk in peanut butter and vanilla until pudding is smooth and all ingredients combined. Immediately scrape filling into crust (which can still be a tad warm), and spread filling evenly, smoothing the top. Let pie stand while you make the ganache topping.

  6. Make the Ganache & Decorate: Melt chocolate and cream together in a small microwave-safe bowl, in microwave, stirring until combined and smooth. You can also do this in top of double boiler on stove. Pour ganache over top of pie them pick up pie and tilt it gently this way and that to encourage the flow of ganache to cover peanut butter filling completely. Use a small, offset icing spatula to facilitate, if needed. Sprinkle peanuts over pie edges as shows; refrigerate at least 2 hours, or overnight. Sprinkle peanuts with sea salt right before serving. Serve cold, cut into wedges with a thin, sharp knife.

Notes:

FODMAP Information

All recipes are based upon Monash University & FODMAP Friendly science at time of initial publication.

• Brown Sugar: Brown sugar has been lab tested by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly. There are many kinds of brown sugar, from cane to beet (to blends) to Muscovado and more, which we discuss in our Explore An Ingredient: Sugar. Unfortunately, there is no information about what kind of brown sugars were lab tested. Monash gives us a low FODMAP amount of ¼ cup or 40 g but no further information. In addition, in private correspondence with Monash University we know that there are amounts larger than 40 g that would be considered low FODMAP. FODMAP Friendly gives us a low FODMAP amount of 13 g. Dark brown Muscovado sugar does appear in a product lab tested and certified low FODMAP by FODMAP Friendly, so we do know there is a low FODMAP amount.

• Butter: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested butter. Monash states that a low FODMAP Green Light portion is 1 tablespoon or 19 g and also states that “butter is high in fat and does not contain carbohydrates (FODMAPs)”. FODMAP Friendly gives it a “Pass” at 1 tablespoon or 19 g. Both recommended serving sizes are presented as part of healthy eating guidelines, not as maximum FODMAP serving size. Fat can affect guy motility and trigger IBS symptoms in some people. Eat to your tolerance.

• Chocolate: Monash University has lab tested dark, milk and white chocolate all have low FODMAP amounts: 85% dark at 20 g; dark at 30 g; milk at 20 g; white at 25 g. FODMAP Friendly has also lab tested dark chocolate, milk and white chocolate. Their lab tests place low FODMAP servings for dark chocolate at 30 g, with a max low FODMAP serving size of 101 g. Milk chocolate is 30 g with a 38 g max serve; white chocolate is also 30 g with a max low FODMAP serve of 38 g.

• Dairy: The low FODMAP diet is not a dairy-free diet. It is, however, low in lactose. Many dairy ingredients are low in lactose, such as heavy cream and many cheeses.

Peanuts: Monash has lab tested peanuts. They are low FODMAP in 28 g amounts, which they say is 32 nuts (but sizes can vary, so go by weight). They state say that only trace amounts of FODMAPs have been found in peanuts.

• Peanut Butter: Monash and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested peanut butter. We do not have further information as to what kind of peanut butter was tested (unsweetened natural, made with hydrogenated oil and sugar, or no-stir style with palm oil and sugar). Monash shows two entries. We do not know what the images correspond to in terms of type of peanut butter. They state that both are low FODMAP at 2 Australian tablespoons, although one is said to be 50 g and the other 32 g. FODMAP Friendly’s app image shows what looks to be some sort of creamy style (not natural). They give it a “Pass” at 2 tablespoons (50 g), but also state a Max Serve at 6.86 ounces or 192.05 g. It is also important to note that Monash has said peanuts themselves have only trace amounts of FODMAPs and they say that peanut butter only becomes Moderate for fructose at 140 g. If you malabsorb fructose, it might be an issue; for others it might be tolerated very well.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. Foods will be retested from time to time; in the case of raw ingredients, such as fruits and vegetables, results may vary. All lab tested results are valid and represent a snapshot in time. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Course: Dessert
Cuisine: American

Nutrition

Calories: 252kcal | Carbohydrates: 21g | Protein: 6g | Fat: 16g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.4g | Monounsaturated Fat: 2g | Trans Fat: 0.01g | Cholesterol: 66mg | Sodium: 115mg | Potassium: 57mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 13g | Vitamin A: 92IU | Calcium: 13mg | Iron: 1mg

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.

Calling all peanut butter lovers! For many of our most luscious peanut butter recipes all in one place, check out this Peanut Butter round-up article.