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Low FODMAP Chunky Rice Krispie Treats

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Our Low FODMAP Chunky Rice Krispie Treats are an ode to the Chunky candy bar, that combines chocolate, peanuts and raisins. Here I have combined these ingredients, in low FODMAP portions, with Rice Krispies, peanut butter, maple syrup and coconut oil and made a decadent snack! Sort of fancy, kind of homestyle at the same time, and easy to make! (The original candy bar features milk chocolate; I chose to use dark, but you can use milk).

horizontal image of Low FODMAP Chunky Rice Krispie Treat held in manicured hand

Monash Certified Low FODMAP Cereal

Did you know that Kellogg’s Rice Krispies are certified low FODMAP by Monash University? They are! And while we love them in a bowl with milk (LOFO of course) we also like using them to make treats, like these Low FODMAP Chunky Rice Krispie Treats. And they are easy! Fun to make with kids.

closeup of Low FODMAP Chunky Rice Krispie Treat held in manicured hand

You can also see them put to great use in our Cappuccino Rice Krispie Treats.

Raisins Can Be Low FODMAP

Did you know that you can have raisins, even during Elimination? You can! Monash and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested raisins. While raw grapes contain no FODMAPs, the natural sugars concentrate upon drying and the resulting raisins do contain FODMAPs. Monash says a low FODMAP Green Light serving is 1 Australian tablespoon (13 g). FODMAP Friendly gives them a “Pass” at 3 tablespoons (30 g).

Note that Australian tablespoons are larger than other tablespoons, and therefore the amounts you can eat are larger than you might think! Read our article, When Is A Tablespoon Not A Tablespoon?, which explains this in-depth.

Our Low FODMAP Chunky Rice Krispie Treats, per serving, contain a low FODMAP amount of raisins.

overhead of Low FODMAP Chunky Rice Krispie Treat on white plate

Dark Chocolate & FODMAPs

Monash has lab tested two different kinds of dark chocolate. One of them has a serving size of 30 g but if you read the small print you can see that the limiting factor that Monash has taken into consideration is lactose. This means that they tested a dark chocolate that contains a milk product. There are several problems with this.

First of all, since we are not given brand and exact item information, we have no idea what cacao content is in the chocolate they tested, nor the amount or type of dairy. Secondly, what do they even mean by “dark” chocolate? This can vary country to country. In the U.S. it is accepted that “dark chocolate” can be labeled as semisweet or bittersweet and only has to have at least 35% cacao solids – which is not very much at all, when it comes to “dark” chocolates. Thirdly, most chocolate connoisseurs will tell you that high quality dark chocolate will not contain lactose.

Now, this is good news and bad news. It means that the chocolate they tested is probably not a very fine chocolate. On the other hand, it does mean that it is probably a typical, economical, supermarket chocolate, which is what many people often bake with.

super closeup Low FODMAP Chunky Rice Krispie Treat held in hand

Always Read The Small Print

The other chocolate entry in the Monash app is designated as 85% cacao and the serving size is 20 g BUT if you read the small print, you will see that Monash just admonishes not eating more than 350 g (which is quite a lot more than 20 g).

One thing that is not apparent to the public is that many of the entries in the Monash app are based on Australian Healthy Eating Guidelines. So, the amounts given are not necessarily driven (or just driven) by FODMAPs, but by Australian Healthy Eating Guidelines as well. Here we can see that they might suggest 20 g of chocolate (perhaps a healthy guideline) but we can also see that it is not about FODMAP limits when we read the fine print.

Please read our article, All About Dark Chocolate & FODMAPs. (You might like our articles on Milk Chocolate, White Chocolate and Cocoa as well).

The important thing here is that the 6-ounces (170 g) that are used here in our Low FODMAP Chunky Rice Krispie Treats, divided by the 16 servings, is well under the recommended amounts by Monash.

Low FODMAP Chunky Rice Krispie Treat, bit into, held in hand

Get Your Chunky Fix

This all means that you can enjoy a peanut-y, chocolatey, sweet treat, chewy with raisins and crispy with cereal that will please everyone, whether they are following the low FODMAP diet or not.

closeup of Low FODMAP Chunky Rice Krispie Treat held in manicured hand
4 from 3 votes

Low FODMAP Chunky Rice Krispie Treats

Our Low FODMAP Chunky Rice Krispie Treats are an ode to the Chunky candy bar, that combines chocolate, peanuts and raisins. Here I have combined these ingredients, in low FODMAP portions, with Rice Krispies, peanut butter, maple syrup and coconut oil and made a decadent snack! Sort of fancy, kind of homestyle at the same time, and easy to make!

Low FODMAP Serving Size Info: Makes 16 bars; 1 bar per serving; 16 servings

Makes: 16 Servings
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 2 minutes
Chilling Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 42 minutes
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups (80 g) crisp rice cereal, such as Kellogg’s Rice Krispies
  • ½ cup (83 g) raisins
  • 3/4 cup (200 g) natural creamy peanut butter
  • 1/3 cup (75 ml) maple syrup
  • 2 tablespoons refined coconut oil, melted
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 6- ounces (170 g) semisweet chocolate, about 50% to 60% cacao mass, melted
  • ½ cup (72 g) chopped roasted peanuts
  • Maldon salt or kosher salt

Preparation:

  1. Line an 8-inch by 8-inch pan (20 cm by 20 cm) with parchment paper. Coat the inside of the paper and pan with nonstick spray; set aside.
  2. Toss cereal and raisins together in a large heat-proof mixing bowl; set aside.
  3. Stir the peanut butter, maple syrup, coconut oil and salt together in a small heavy-bottomed saucepan. Heat over low-medium heat until it begins to simmer, then simmer for about 1 minute, stirring occasionally, and watch carefully to avoid scorching.
  4. Immediately pour over cereal in bowl along with vanilla and begin to fold together with a heatproof silicone spatula until everything is evenly combined.
  5. Scrape into prepared pan, smoothing and flattening the top. I like to use a small offset spatula, then wipe it dry for the next step.
  6. Pour the melted chocolate over the top of the cereal mixture and use the offset spatula to spread the chocolate evenly over the entire surface area. Immediately sprinkle peanuts over the wet chocolate. Refrigerate for about half an hour or until chocolate is just set.
  7. Unmold, peel away parchment and place chunky bars on cutting board. Cut into 16 bars, sprinkle with coarse Maldon salt and serve. Bars can be refrigerated in a single layer in an airtight container for up to 4 days. They can be served cold or at room temperature.

Tips

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

  • Chocolate: Monash University has lab tested dark, milk and white chocolate all have low FODMAP amounts: 85% dark at 20 g; dark at 30 g; milk at 20 g; white at 25 g.
  • Maple Syrup: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested maple syrup. Monash says that maple syrup is Green light and low FODMAP in servings of 2 Australian tablespoons (50 g). FODMAP Friendly gives it a “Pass” at 2 tablespoons (53 g). These amounts are likely recommended due to Australian healthy eating guidelines; no upper limit is posted by either Monash or FODMAP Friendly.
  • Peanut Butter: Monash and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested peanut butter. We do not have further information as to what kind of peanut butter was tested (unsweetened natural, made with hydrogenated oil and sugar, or creamy style with palm oil and sugar). Monash shows two entries. We do not know what the images correspond to in terms of type of peanut butter. They state that both are low FODMAP at 2 Australian tablespoons, although one is said to be 50 g and the other 32 g. FODMAP Friendly’s app image shows what looks to be some sort of creamy style (not natural). They give it a “Pass” at 2 tablespoons (50 g).

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Course: Dessert, Snack, Treat
Cuisine: American

Nutrition

Calories: 235kcal | Carbohydrates: 24g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 14g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Cholesterol: 1mg | Sodium: 22mg | Potassium: 132mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 8g | Vitamin A: 5IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 14mg | Iron: 1mg

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.

closeup of Low FODMAP Chunky Rice Krispie Treat held in manicured hand