Recipes | Pies & Tarts

Low FODMAP Cranberry Curd Tart

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Our Low FODMAP Cranberry Curd Tart features a crisp, buttery tart crust made with ground blanched almonds, a tart/sweet cranberry curd filling which is accented with orange, and a toasted meringue topping. If you make one tart during the cooler months, we highly recommend this one! It is gorgeous – and really quite delicious, with contrasting textures as well. 

overhead low FODMAP Cranberry Curd tart on gold plate
An almond crust, smooth sweet/tart cranberry filling and a toasted meringue topping.

Visual Inspiration

I am all about taste. What I cook has to taste great. Even when I wrote my two wedding cake books (The Wedding Cake Book and Wedding Cakes You Can Make) I was primarily concerned with flavor. That is not to say that visuals cannot be a springboard to inspiration.

Such was the case with this tart that I first saw at Blossom to Stem. That version is not low FODMAP or gluten-free and does not use any almonds, but her images? They just wowed me, and I was headed to the Test Kitchen to come up with a low FODMAP version for all of us.

vertical image of low FODMAP Cranberry Curd tart on gold plate
You can use a propane torch or butane torch to brown the meringue.

Food Processor, Mixer & Blender?

OK, folks I will tell you right up front that when made this recipe I used toasted sliced blanched almonds, which necessitated grinding in a food processor. The filling is puréed in a blender and an electric mixer is used to make the meringue. Three appliances.

I know this seems like a lot to ask, but I figured the folks who would make a tart like this (folks like me) have these appliances and will not be deterred.

If you want to try and streamline, you could start with 6 ¼-ounces (175 g) of finely ground blanched almond flour. Do not use a coarse almond meal and do not use natural almond meal (skin on). It is difficult to evenly toast almond flour, and toasting brings out the almond flavor, so consider this an okay substitution, but not preferable.

closeup of toasted meringue on a tart
The contrasting textures are truly lovely! Crisp crust, smooth tart filling and sweet soft meringue.
Are Almonds Low FODMAP?

Almonds, almond meal and almond flour do have low FODMAP serving sizes. The entries on the Monash app are confusing as the nuts themselves are listed as low FODMAP in 12 g servings, yet almond meal is low FODMAP at 24 g. This might seem contradictory but it has to do how “serving sizes” are determined.
 
Please read our article, What Is A Low FODMAP Serving Size? for more info.
 
The main point is that yes, we can incorporate almonds and almond meal into our low FODMAP diet. Per serving size of this tart, the almonds are within low FODMAP amounts.
 

Are Cranberries Low FODMAP?

Both fresh and dried cranberries have low FODMAP serving sizes. We have discussed this in-depth in our Explore An Ingredient: Cranberries, which we suggest you review.
 
This recipe uses fresh or frozen, and as always, if you stick with our tart serving size, you will be low FODMAP diet compliant.

What Is Cranberry Curd?

Ah, curd. Such an unfortunate term really. Doesn’t exactly sound enticing. Perhaps you have heard of lemon curd? We have a lemon curd recipe for you, too. Lemon curd is much more widely known and is used as a component in desserts, slathered on toast or scones, or if you are like me, eaten with a spoon. It is basically a tart and smooth spread based on sugar, eggs and butter.
 
Cranberry curd, which is a component in this recipe, is made in a similar fashion with the addition of orange or clementine juice. It is a gorgeous jewel color and simply sublime. Sweet and tart at the same time. If you are a lemon lover, I think you will love this tart.

Make Our Tart!

For the Crust: Lightly coat 10-inch (24 cm) loose bottom fluted tart pan with nonstick spray. 

loose bottom fluted tart pan coated with nonstick spray
Make sure to coat the tart pan thoroughly.

Make sure that your blanched sliced almonds are toasted lightly and cooled before you grind them.

lightly toasted blanched almonds on pan
Evenly toasting the almonds brings out flavor and texture.

Fit food processor with metal blade and add flour, almonds and salt.

flour and sliced blanched almonds in food processor bowl
Grinding the nuts with flour prevents you from making almond butter!

Pulse on and off until very finely and evenly ground.

almonds ground fine with flour in food processor
Make sure you grind the nuts evenly and finely.

Cream butter and sugar in stand mixer with flat paddle until well combined.

butter and sugar creamed in stand mixer bowl

Then beat in flour/almond mixture until the dough comes together. You can test it between your fingers.

almond crust holding together when pressed together with fingers
Don’t be shy from using your fingers! The dough should hold together when pressed between your fingers.

Press the crust into the prepared pan.

almond crust poured into tart pan

Prick the bottom all over with a fork.

almond crust pressed into tart pan in even layer

Freeze 30 min. Meanwhile, position rack in middle of oven and preheat to 350°F (180°C). Bake crust about 15 or until just taking on color, but do get it a little golden.

almond crust baked blind
Get a large “cake spatula” to help move the tart in and out of the oven.

Place on rack while you are making the filling.

For the Cranberry Curd Filling: Stir together the cranberries, sugar, citrus zest and juice in a medium sized non-reactive pot.

ingredients for cranberry curd in saucepan

Bring to a simmer over medium heat and cook for about 10 minutes or until cranberries have popped. Scrape into a blender and purée until completely broken down and smooth. Press through a fine-meshed strainer set over a bowl.

cranberry purée in strainer over bowl
A fine-meshed strainer will help remove seeds.

Discard any seeds and solids that are left behind, but use a lot of pressure to get as much super-smooth purée out of the mixture into the waiting bowl. 

using silicone spatula to press cranberry curd through wire mesh strainer

At this point your cranberry purée will be thick and silky smooth.

smooth cranberry purée

Scrape cranberry purée into medium sized non-reactive pot and heat over low heat. Add butter, whisking it in until it starts to incorporate.

whisking butter into cranberry purée in saucepan with whisk

Whisk eggs and yolks in a small bowl and add some warm cranberry mixture to temper the eggs.

tempering eggs with a small amount of warm cranberry purée

Then add eggs to the pot, whisk everything together well, and cook gently until the mixture comes to 170°F (77°C), whisking often to prevent scorching. Remove from heat when it comes to temperature, which ensures proper thickening, and pour into waiting crust, smoothing the top. 

Bake at 350°F (180°C) for about 10 minutes or until curd is set.

cranberry curd tart fully baked on sheet pan

Allow to cool before applying topping. You could refrigerate the tart at this point overnight.

One time that I made this tart, a lot of condensation collected on the surface. I simply dabbed it dry with a paper towel – so don’t fret!

water droplets on tart

For the Topping: Make the topping and finish the tart the day of serving. You are making an Italian meringue (just like for our Italian Meringue Buttercreambut without the butter). Stir sugar and water together in a small saucepan and place over medium heat and bring to a boil. Meanwhile, place egg whites in a clean-grease free bowl of stand mixer and beat with balloon whisk attachment on medium until frothy. Add cream of tartar, increase speed and continue to beat until firm peaks form. Keep boiling sugar syrup until it reaches 250˚F (121°C). With the mixer running, pour syrup in a thin, steady stream directly over the meringue. Do not pour any on the wire whip or the sides of the bowl. Whip meringue until cool to the touch, which could take several minutes.

Scrape meringue into clean pastry bag fitted with a large round tip (or you could use a star tip) and pipe a pretty decorative pattern on top of the cranberry curd in any way you like.

round pastry tip in pastry bag hovering over tart
I used a round tip but you could use any tip you like and make any decoration you fancy.

Use a propane or butane torch to brown the meringue. Tart is ready to serve or can hold for a few hours at cool room temperature.

tart with wedge cut out
The tart cuts cleanly and easily for serving.

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

  • Almonds: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested whole almonds, and their results vary from one another. Monash says that a Green Light low FODMAP portion is 10 whole almonds at 12 g, but a high FODMAP portion is 20 whole almonds at 24 g. FODMAP Friendly gives them a “Pass” at 30 g or ¼ cup.
  • Almond Meal: Monash University has tested almond meal (ground almonds) and states that a low FODMAP serving size is ¼ cup or 24 g. 
  • Butter: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested butter. Monash states that a low FODMAP Green Light portion is 1 tablespoon or 19 g and also states that “butter is high in fat and does not contain carbohydrates (FODMAPs)”. FODMAP Friendly gives it a “Pass” at 1 tablespoon or 19 g. Both recommended serving sizes are presented as part of healthy eating guidelines, not as maximum FODMAP serving size. Fat can affect guy motility and trigger IBS symptoms in some people. Eat to your tolerance.
  • Clementines: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested clementines. FODMAP Friendly gives them a “Pass” at 1 medium fruit (86 g). Monash states that no FODMAPs were detected upon lab testing and set a serving size at 1 medium (86 g).
  • Cranberries: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested cranberries. FODMAP Friendly has lab tested dried cranberries and gives them a “Fail” at 40 g or ⅜ cup. On the Monash app you will find Dried Cranberries are given a Green Light low FODMAP serving of 1 Australian tablespoon, or 15 g. On the Monash website itself they discuss fresh cranberries and state that 130 grams fresh, which is about a scant 1 ¼ cups, should be tolerated well.
  • Eggs: Eggs are high in protein and do not contain carbohydrates, according to Monash University.
  • Navel Oranges: Monash University has lab tested navel oranges and states that no FODMAPs were detected upon lab testing; they set a serving size at 1 medium fruit (130 g).
  • Orange Juice: Monash has told us in private correspondence that freshly squeezed orange juice contains no FODMAPs, per their lab testing. Any kind of processed orange juice, whether bottled, canned or in cardboard packaging, even if it says 100% juice, does contain FODMAPs. The processing affects the FODMAPs. For commercially prepared, try ½ cup (120 ml) and test your tolerance.
  • Sugar: Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested white, granulated sugar. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving size of white sugar is ¼ cup (50 g). FODMAP Friendly simply states that they have tested 1 tablespoon and that it is low FODMAP. Regular granulated white sugar is sucrose, which is a disaccharide made up of equal parts glucose and fructose. Sucrose is broken down and absorbed efficiently in the small intestine. 

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

overhead low FODMAP Cranberry Curd tart on gold plate
5 from 1 vote

Low FODMAP Cranberry Curd Tart

Our Low FODMAP Cranberry Curd Tart features a crisp, buttery tart crust made with blanched almond flour, a tart/sweet cranberry curd filling which is accented with orange, and a toasted meringue topping. If you make one tart during the cooler months, we highly recommend this one! It is gorgeous – and really quite delicious, with contrasting textures as well. 

Makes: 12 Servings
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

Crust:

Cranberry Curd Filling:

  • 12- ounces (340 g) fresh or frozen (defrosted) cranberries, picked clean
  • 1 cup (198 g) sugar
  • ½ cup (120 ml) freshly squeezed orange juice or clementine juice
  • Zest of 1 orange or clementine; white pith removed
  • ½ cup (113 g; 1 stick) softened unsalted butter, cut into pieces
  • 2 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 2 large egg yolks, at room temperature

Topping:

Preparation:

  1. For the Crust: Lightly coat 10-inch (24 cm) loose bottom fluted tart pan with nonstick spray.

  2. Fit food processor with metal blade and add flour, almonds and salt. Pulse on and off until very finely and evenly ground. Cream butter and sugar in stand mixer with flat paddle until well combined, then beat in flour/almond mixture until the dough comes together.
  3. Press the crust into the prepared pan; prick the bottom all over with a fork. Freeze 30 min. Meanwhile, position rack in middle of oven and preheat to 350°F (180°C). Bake crust about 15 or until just taking on color. Place on rack while you are making the filling.
  4. For the Cranberry Curd Filling: Stir together the cranberries, sugar, citrus zest and juice in a medium sized non-reactive pot. Bring to a simmer over medium heat and cook for about 10 minutes or until cranberries have popped. Scrape into a blender and purée until completely broken down and smooth. Press through a fine-meshed strainer set over a bowl, discarding any seeds and solids that are left behind, but use a lot of pressure to get as much super-smooth purée out of the mixture into the waiting bowl.

  5. Scrape cranberry purée into medium sized non-reactive pot and heat over low heat. Add butter, whisking it in until it starts to incorporate. Whisk eggs and yolks in a small bowl and add some warm cranberry mixture to temper the eggs, then add eggs to the pot, whisk everything together well, and cook gently until the mixture comes to 170°F (77°C), whisking often to prevent scorching. Remove from heat when it comes to temperature, which ensures proper thickening, and pour into waiting crust, smoothing the top.
  6. Bake at 350°F (180°C) for about 10 minutes or until curd is set. Allow to cool before applying topping. You could refrigerate the tart at this point overnight.
  7. For the Topping: Make the topping and finish the tart the day of serving. You are making an Italian meringue (just like for our Italian Meringue Buttercream, but without the butter). Stir sugar and water together in a small saucepan and place over medium heat and bring to a boil. Meanwhile, place egg whites in a clean-grease free bowl of stand mixer and beat with balloon whisk attachment on medium until frothy. Add cream of tartar, increase speed and continue to beat until firm peaks form. Keep boiling sugar syrup until it reaches 250˚F (121°C). With the mixer running, pour syrup in a thin, steady stream directly over the meringue. Do not pour any on the wire whip or the sides of the bowl. Whip meringue until cool to the touch, which could take several minutes.

  8. Scrape meringue into clean pastry bag fitted with a large round tip (or you could use a star tip) and pipe a pretty decorative pattern on top of the cranberry curd in any way you like.
  9. Use a propane or butane torch to brown the meringue. Tart is ready to serve or can hold for a few hours at cool room temperature.

Notes:

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

• Almonds: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested whole almonds, and their results vary from one another. Monash says that a Green Light low FODMAP portion is 10 whole almonds at 12 g, but a high FODMAP portion is 20 whole almonds at 24 g. FODMAP Friendly gives them a “Pass” at 30 g or ¼ cup.
• Almond Meal: Monash University has tested almond meal (ground almonds) and states that a low FODMAP serving size is ¼ cup or 24 g.
• Butter: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested butter. Monash states that a low FODMAP Green Light portion is 1 tablespoon or 19 g and also states that “butter is high in fat and does not contain carbohydrates (FODMAPs)”. FODMAP Friendly gives it a “Pass” at 1 tablespoon or 19 g. Both recommended serving sizes are presented as part of healthy eating guidelines, not as maximum FODMAP serving size. Fat can affect guy motility and trigger IBS symptoms in some people. Eat to your tolerance.
• Clementines: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested clementines. FODMAP Friendly gives them a “Pass” at 1 medium fruit (86 g). Monash states that no FODMAPs were detected upon lab testing and set a serving size at 1 medium (86 g).
• Cranberries: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested cranberries. FODMAP Friendly has lab tested dried cranberries and gives them a “Fail” at 40 g or ⅜ cup. On the Monash app you will find Dried Cranberries are given a Green Light low FODMAP serving of 1 Australian tablespoon, or 15 g. On the Monash website itself they discuss fresh cranberries and state that 130 grams fresh, which is about a scant 1 ¼ cups, should be tolerated well.
• Eggs: Eggs are high in protein and do not contain carbohydrates, according to Monash University.
• Navel Oranges: Monash University has lab tested navel oranges and states that no FODMAPs were detected upon lab testing; they set a serving size at 1 medium fruit (130 g).
• Orange Juice: Monash has told us in private correspondence that freshly squeezed orange juice contains no FODMAPs, per their lab testing. Any kind of processed orange juice, whether bottled, canned or in cardboard packaging, even if it says 100% juice, does contain FODMAPs. The processing affects the FODMAPs. For commercially prepared, try ½ cup (120 ml) and test your tolerance.
• Sugar: Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested white, granulated sugar. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving size of white sugar is ¼ cup (50 g). FODMAP Friendly simply states that they have tested 1 tablespoon and that it is low FODMAP. Regular granulated white sugar is sucrose, which is a disaccharide made up of equal parts glucose and fructose. Sucrose is broken down and absorbed efficiently in the small intestine.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Course: Dessert
Cuisine: American

Nutrition

Calories: 389kcal | Carbohydrates: 53g | Protein: 4g | Fat: 19g | Sodium: 59mg | Potassium: 6mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 41g | Calcium: 1mg | Iron: 1mg

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.