Recipes | Sauces, Salsas & Condiments

Low FODMAP Ginger Cranberry Sauce with Tangerines

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This Low FODMAP Ginger Cranberry Sauce with Tangerines is for those who love eating a whole orange, such as in orange marmalade. Here, the recipe begins by cooking the whole tangerine slices in sugar, juice and water until tender, then the cranberries and ginger are added at the end of cooking.

closeup up horizontal shot of cranberry sauce in footed glass dish

Are Cranberries Low FODMAP?

There are low FODMAP amounts of fresh cranberries and we delve into everything cranberry in our article, Explore An Ingredient: Cranberries, which we encourage you to read.

Read The Monash Website

Although fresh cranberries are not listed on the Monash app as of this writing, Monash does discuss them on their website where they state that 130 grams fresh, which is about a scant 1 ¼ cups of cranberries, should be tolerated well.

vertical image of cranberry sauce in footed glass bowlIs Orange Juice Low FODMAP?

This is a simple question with an interesting answer! Monash has let us know that freshly squeezed orange juice contains no FODMAPs, just like fresh oranges. Once orange juice is processed – even if it says “fresh” – the FODMAP content changes.

Processing Changes FODMAPs

You would be shocked to see how much tinkering goes into bottling “fresh” orange juice. For FODMAP purposes, stick with freshly squeezed.

closeup of cranberry sauce in glass dish

Why We Use The Whole Orange

I am a marmalade fan and very thankful that it is low FODMAP in amounts of 2 Australian tablespoons (40 g). We also have a similar and simplified version of this recipe called Cranberry Sauce with Orange Marmalade, but this one starts from scratch with the whole citrus.

Orange Marmalade Lovers Unite

If you love eating candied citrus peel and orange marmalade, then this cranberry sauce will thrill you. If you have never tried eating the peel, but like oranges, I encourage you to give it a try. Or maybe start with the Cranberry Sauce with Orange Marmalade recipe as an easy introduction.

Ingredients for Low FODMAP Ginger Cranberry Sauce with Tangerines

Fresh ginger is a must!

Ingredients for cranberry ginger tangerine sauce

How To Make  Low FODMAP Ginger Cranberry Sauce with Tangerines

Stir 1 cup (240 ml) of water, brown sugar and orange juice together in a non-reactive pot; stir in oranges. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, adjust heat, partially cover and simmer gently until citrus peels soften, about 1 hour.

sliced oranges cooking in water and orange juice

Add remaining ½ cup (120 ml) water, cranberries and ginger and simmer for about 10 minutes more or until cranberries pop. I like to use a Microplane zester for the ginger.

grating fresh ginger into a pot of cranberriesThe sauce will be nice and thick and juicy.

cranberry orange sauce simmering in potCool. Your cranberry sauce is ready to serve.

More Cranberry Lusciousness

We can’t get enough cranberry sauce or cranberry recipes. Be sure to check these out:

closeup up horizontal shot of cranberry sauce in footed glass dish
5 from 3 votes

Low FODMAP Ginger Cranberry Sauce with Tangerines

This Low FODMAP Ginger Cranberry Sauce with Tangerines is for those who love eating a whole orange, such as in orange marmalade. Here, the recipe begins by cooking the whole tangerine slices in sugar, juice and water until tender, then the cranberries and ginger are added at the end of cooking.

Low FODMAP Serving Size Info: Makes about 3 cups; 12 servings; serving size ¼ cup (approximately 60 g)

Makes: 12 Servings
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour 10 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 20 minutes
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

  • 1 ½ cups (360 ml) water, divided
  • 1 ¼ cup (267 g) firmly packed light brown sugar
  • 1 cup (240 ml) freshly squeezed orange juice
  • 4 tangerines or mandarin oranges, scrubbed, very thinly sliced crosswise, seeds removed
  • 1- pound (455 g) fresh or frozen cranberries
  • 2 teaspoons finely grated fresh ginger

Preparation:

  1. Stir 1 cup (240 ml) of water, brown sugar and orange juice together in a non-reactive pot; stir in oranges. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, adjust heat, partially cover and simmer gently until citrus peels soften, about 1 hour. Add remaining ½ cup (120 ml) water, cranberries and ginger and simmer for about 10 minutes more or until cranberries pop. Cool. Your cranberry sauce is ready to serve.
  2. Sauce may be refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 4 days. Bring to room temperature before serving.

Tips

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

  • Cranberries: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested cranberries. FODMAP Friendly has lab tested dried cranberries and gives them a “Fail” at 40 g or ⅜ cup. On the Monash app you will find Dried Cranberries are given a Green Light low FODMAP serving of 1 Australian tablespoon, or 15 g. On the Monash website itself they discuss fresh cranberries and state that 130 grams fresh, which is about a scant 1 ¼ cups, should be tolerated well.
  • Sugar: Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested white, granulated sugar. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving size of white sugar is ¼ cup (50 g). FODMAP Friendly simply states that they have tested 1 tablespoon and that it is low FODMAP. Regular granulated white sugar is sucrose, which is a disaccharide made up of equal parts glucose and fructose. Sucrose is broken down and absorbed efficiently in the small intestine.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Course: Condiment, Sauce
Cuisine: American

Nutrition

Calories: 127kcal | Carbohydrates: 32g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 1g | Sodium: 1mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 25g | Calcium: 1mg

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.