Recipes | Lunch

Low FODMAP Salmon Potato Salad with Green Beans

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Our Low FODMAP Salmon Potato Salad with Green Beans takes inspiration from classic Salade Nicoise. Here you can use leftover cooked salmon, salmon cooked just for the purpose or we highly recommend canned salmon, if you know which kind to buy (more on that later). Along with tender cooked yellow potatoes and crisp tender green beans, all you need is a simple creamy dill dressing. This makes a hearty lunch to take to work, school or to serve at an elegant sit-down meal. Even for a light dinner.

horizontal image of low FODMAP Salmon Potato Salad with green beans and dill sprigs on white oval platter; blue background

Salmon: Fresh & Canned

The recipe calls for 14 to 16-ounces (400 g to 455 g) of cooked salmon, warm or room temperature. You can roast or poach fish just for this purpose, if you like. As far as leftovers, I don’t know that I have ever had 1-pound (455 g) of leftover cooked salmon! But if you have some, you can use it.

What I highly recommend is canned salmon, but they are not all created equal.

After having done such in-depth research on canned tuna, I was so surprised to see how simple the labels are for canned salmon: fish, water and salt.

comparing ingredients for canned salmonWith tuna, as you will read in our article, the water/brine-based ones can contain FODMAPs. In some cased the salmon and tuna products were made by the same company, like Bumble Bee. Why can’t they make tuna like the salmon? Oh well.

two different brands of canned salmon

Here in this image below you can see the difference between the Bumble Bee and the Rubenstein’s. Now, the Bumble Bee is skinless and boneless and the other isn’t and I will address that in a moment.

two brands of canned salmon out of the can, compared

You can see that they are not similar at all. The Rubenstein’s on the left is richer in color (in person the Rubenstein’s is much darker) and most importantly, is made up of large chunks. The Bumble Bee is very pale (looked very much like canned tuna) and is made up of tiny little flakes – flecks really – with no substance. For me the choice is clear with the Rubenstein’s (or equivalent).

But then there are the skin and bones to deal with. The fact is that the bones have been cooked along with the salmon to a very soft texture. Along with the skin they even provide more nutrition. If you like you can remove the skin and the larger bones, but we encourage you to just drain the salmon and use everything from the can. We know this won’t be for everyone, in which case you can choose a different source of cooked salmon – home cooked or canned (skinless boneless).

vertical image of low FODMAP Salmon Potato Salad with green beans and dill sprigs on white oval platter; blue background

 

Green Beans & FODMAPs

We love green beans and use them in many LOFO recipes, such as this fancy Chicken Salad with Gruyere, Green Beans, Tomatoes & Basil or in seasonal dishes like the Thanksgiving-worthy Low FODMAP “Triple Onion” Green Beans.

Green beans have been lab tested by both FODMAP Friendly and Monash University. FODMAP Friendly gives them a “Pass” at 75 g, which they say is about 14 beans. Monash gives them a Green Light low FODMAP serving size of 75 g or 15 beans.

You can steam or boil them for this recipe. I take a simple approach and just throw them into the boiling potatoes for their last 2 minutes of cooking.

Potatoes & FODMAPs

We have an entire article for you on Explore An Ingredient: Potatoes. But here is the easy thing to remember: potatoes have no FODMAPs! That’s right. Red skinned, yellow skinned, purple-skinned and starchy baking potatoes contain no FODMAPs and are a fantastic carb to include in your low FODMAP diet.

For this recipe I like, in order of preference, Yukon gold style potatoes, white skinned or red skinned.

vertial image of Low FODMAP Salmon Potato Salad with Green Beans on Oval platter and blue backdrop

How To Make Low FODMAP Salmon Potato Salad

Once you have chosen your salmon and it is cooked – or can is open and drained – you will be eating in about 20 minutes.

Simply boil or steam, your potatoes of choice and when they are about 2 to 3 minutes shy of being done, add your green beans to the pot. Cook both at once! Drain and you are ready to toss with the salmon and add dressing.

The dressing is a simple vinaigrette with a little yogurt for a creamy texture and lots of fresh dill. Dried dill could be used in a pinch.

Choose Your Temperature for Low FODMAP Salmon Potato Salad

I like this salad warm right after it has been prepared, but you can eat it at room temperature as well.

You might also like our smoked trout salad – SO COLORFUL! Check it out.

horizontal image of low FODMAP Salmon Potato Salad with green beans and dill sprigs on white oval platter; blue background
5 from 1 vote

Low FODMAP Salmon Potato Salad with Green Beans

Our Low FODMAP Salmon Potato Salad with Green Beans takes inspiration from classic Salade Nicoise. Here you can use leftover cooked salmon, salmon cooked just for the purpose or we highly recommend canned salmon, if you know which kind to buy (more on that later). Along with tender cooked yellow potatoes and crisp tender green beans, all you need is a simple creamy dill dressing. This makes a hearty lunch to take to work, school or to serve at an elegant sit-down meal. Even for a light dinner.

Makes: 4 Servings
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

Salad:

  • 1- pound (455 g) gold potatoes, scrubbed, cut into large bite-sized pieces
  • 4- ounces (115 g) green beans, trimmed
  • 14 to 16- ounces (400 g to 455 g) cooked salmon (canned is fine), warm or room temperature

Dressing:

  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons plain Greek yogurt or lactose-free yogurt
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill or 2 teaspoons dried dill

Preparation:

  1. For the Salad: Either steam or boil the potatoes in a covered pot large enough pot to accommodate the beans, too. Cook until still a little firm – about 2 to 3 minutes before they are done. Add the beans, cover, and cook just until beans and potatoes are done. Drain.

  2. Meanwhile, flake the salmon in a large mixing bowl; set aside.
  3. For the Dressing: Whisk together the oil, vinegar and mustard, or shake together in a cove red jar. Season with salt and pepper, then whisk or shake in the yogurt and dill.

  4. Add the warm potatoes and beans to the bowl of salmon and drizzle over some of the dressing. Fold everything together to coat well, adding more dressing as needed. The Low FODMAP Salmon Potato Salad with Green Beans is ready to serve warm, or it can be served at room temperature. It will keep in an airtight container for up to 3 days. Bring back to room temperature for best flavors and texture before serving.

Tips

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

  • Green Beans: Green beans have been lab tested by both FODMAP Friendly and Monash University. FODMAP Friendly gives them a “Pass” at 75 g, which they say is about 14 beans. Monash gives them a Green Light low FODMAP serving size of 75 g or 15 beans.
  • Potatoes: Potatoes have been lab tested and deemed low FODMAP by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly. According to Monash, starchy baking potatoes, red-skinned, yellow-skinned and purple potatoes contain no FODMAPs.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Course: lunch, Salad
Cuisine: American

Nutrition

Calories: 351kcal | Carbohydrates: 24g | Protein: 25g | Fat: 17g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 1mg | Sodium: 19mg | Potassium: 20mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 2g | Calcium: 8mg | Iron: 1mg

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.