Recipes | Cookies, Brownies & Bars

Low FODMAP Salted Buckwheat Chocolate Chunk Cookies

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Low FODMAP Salted Buckwheat Chocolate Chunk Cookies are yet another easy chocolate chunk cookie to add to your repertoire – this time featuring buckwheat flour. Buckwheat flour has been lab tested by Monash University and is low FODMAP in 2/3 cup (100 g) portions, which is plenty to showcase in a recipe like this. And it is naturally gluten-free, so our final cookie is as well.

low FODMAP Salted Buckwheat Chocolate Chunk Cookies on a dark surface; silver tray showing in corner

Low FODMAP Gluten-Free Flours

There are many gluten-free flours that are low FODMAP, however, just because a flour is gluten-free does not mean it is low FODMAP Elimination compliant.

Buckwheat flour, as mentioned above, is one of the flours we can enjoy on the diet. Check out our Buckwheat Banana Pancakes and our Glorious Morning Muffins for additional recipes featuring this fabulous flour.

closeup of chocolate chunk cookie held in hand

Here is a list of gluten-free flours and starches that are low FODMAP:

  • Arrowroot
  • Buckwheat flour
  • Cornmeal, corn flour, cornstarch & masa harina
  • Green banana flour
  • Maize flour
  • Millet flour
  • Oat bran & flour
  • Potato flour or starch
  • Quinoa flour
  • Rice bran, flour or starch, brown & white
  • Sorghum flour
  • Tapioca flour or starch
  • Teff

vertical image of salted chocolate chunk cookies on dark background

Chill, Baby, Chill

Many of our cookie recipes call for a chilling time. This time in the fridge is not just to create a cold dough, so that cookies will hold their shape better, although that is part of it. This chilling time allows for hydration of the dry ingredients, which improves overall texture.

This chilling technique can be very obvious in oatmeal cookies, as the oats truly take on a different texture. In other recipes the result can be a bit more subtle, but no less highly recommended.

So, plan ahead. You need a 2-hour chill time for this cookie dough.

salted buckwheat chocolate chunk cookies on black table with silver tray

Leaveners & Eggs

It is very typical to see chemical leaveners, such as baking powder and/or baking soda used in chocolate chunk cookie recipes. In general, with a classic Toll-House cookie approach, I will use baking soda only. There was a period of time when I was doing a lot of side-by-side taste testing and I decided that I did not like baking powder in my chocolate chunk cookies.

There are exceptions, such as this recipe. Buckwheat flour can be heavy and the use of a small amount of both baking powder and baking soda gives us the results we want.

As far as eggs, there are usually eggs in chocolate chip or chunk recipes – except our phenomenal Vegan Chocolate Chunk Cookies, which are worth a try whether you are began or not. Extra yolks will pop up in certain cookie or bar recipes when we want a bit more lushness that the added fat provides. Again, because of the buckwheat, we find the extra yolks do the trick.

This recipe is a FODMAP IT! version of one from my alma mater’s Test Kitchen at Bon Appetit. The originals were not gluten-free or low FODMAP.

vertical image of salted buckwheat chocolate chunk cookies on dark background

Ingredients

We love Bob Red Mill’s buckwheat flour. It has a fabulous, fine texture and happens to be organic, if that is important for you.

Salted Buckwheat Chocolate Chunk Cookie Ingredients

 

How To Make Low FODMAP Salted Buckwheat Chocolate Chunk Cookies

Whisk together the flour, buckwheat, baking powder, baking soda and 1 ¼ teaspoons kosher salt to aerate and combine. Set aside.

dry ingredients in a glass bowl including buckwheat flour

Melt the butter in a large bowl in the microwave (in which case this can be a one-bowl recipe) or melt in a saucepan then transfer to a large mixing bowl.

melted butter in clear glass bowl with whisk

Whisk in both sugars…

whisking together melted butter and brown sugar in glass bowl with metal whisk

…keep mixing until the mixture is lightened in color and creamy in texture, which is more than you might usually do for chocolate chunk cookies. It should look like this.

whisking eggs and egg yolks into melted butter and sugar in glass bowl

Whisk in vanilla extract, then whisk in the egg yolks and egg, one at a time, until everything is well combined, and again, looks thick and creamy. I tried to get artsy and take an image in motion. It didn’t work very well, but here you go!

whisk until creamy. melted buttr, brown sugar, eggs and egg yolks

Add dry ingredients and use a silicone spatula or sturdy wooden spoon to stir to incorporate…

adding flour mixture to cookie dough batter in bowl

Keep stirring until a few floury streaks remain.

mixing flour about three-quarters of the way mixed in cookie dough

Add about three-quarters of the chopped chocolate, mixing just to distribute.

folding chocolate chunks into cookie dough in glass bowl

Important Chilling Step!

Cover bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 2 hours. (You can refrigerate overnight if you like).

Meanwhile position racks in upper and lower third of oven. Preheat to 375°F (190°C). Line two half-sheet pans with parchment paper. Create 2-inch (5 cm) balls – we like using a trusty scoop – and space 6 of them evenly apart on each prepared pans (see images). Top with extra pieces of chocolate. Keep extra dough chilled as first batches bake. Below is a photo of how the dough balls should be spaced out.

spacing chocolate chunk cookie dough out on parchment lined baking sheet panBake cookies, rotating pans top to bottom and front to back halfway through, until edges are golden brown, but centers are still a bit soft, 8 to 10 minutes. Remove pans from oven and tap on a sturdy heatproof surface to slightly deflate cookies. Immediately sprinkle with extra salt and cool pans on racks. Repeat with remaining dough.

Cookies are amazing slightly warm and once cooled can be stored at room temperature in an airtight container for up to 3 days.

giant chocolate chunk cookie held in hand

low FODMAP Salted Buckwheat Chocolate Chunk Cookies on a dark surface; silver tray showing in corner
4.8 from 5 votes

Low FODMAP Salted Buckwheat Chocolate Chunk Cookies

Low FODMAP Salted Buckwheat Chocolate Chunk Cookies are yet another easy chocolate chunk cookie to add to your repertoire – this time featuring buckwheat flour. Buckwheat flour has been lab tested by Monash University and is low FODMAP in 2/3 cup (100 g) portions, which is plenty to showcase in a recipe like this. And it is naturally gluten-free, so our final cookie is as well. 

Low FODMAP Serving Size Info: Makes 22 cookies; 22 servings; serving size 1 cookie

Makes: 22 Servings
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Chilling Time: 2 hours
Total Time: 2 hours 30 minutes
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

  • ¾ cup (109 g) plus 1 tablespoon low FODMAP gluten-free all-purpose flour, such as Bob Red Mill’s 1 to 1 Gluten Free Baking Flour
  • ½ cup (63 g) buckwheat flour, such as Bob Red Mill’s Buckwheat Flour
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder; use gluten-free if following a gluten-free diet
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • teaspoon kosher salt, plus extra
  • ½ cup (113 g; 1 stick) unsalted butter, cut into pieces
  • cup (141 g) firmly packed light brown sugar
  • ½ cup (99 g) sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 large egg yolks, at room temperature
  • 1 large egg, at room temperature
  • 6- ounces (170 g) bulk or bar bittersweet chocolate, preferably around 65 to 70 % cacao, cut into chunks, divided

Preparation:

  1. Whisk together the flour, buckwheat, baking powder, baking soda and 1 ¼ teaspoons kosher salt to aerate and combine. Set aside.
  2. Melt the butter in a large bowl in the microwave (in which case this can be a one-bowl recipe) or melt in a saucepan then transfer to a large mixing bowl.
  3. Whisk in both sugars until the mixture is lightened in color and creamy in texture, which is more than you might usually do for chocolate chunk cookies. Whisk in vanilla extract, then whisk in the egg yolks and egg, one at a time, until everything is well combined.
  4. Add dry ingredients and use a silicone spatula or sturdy wooden spoon to stir until a few floury streaks remain. Add about three-quarters of the chopped chocolate, mixing just to distribute. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 2 hours. (You can refrigerate overnight if you like).
  5. Position racks in upper and lower third of oven. Preheat to 375°F (190°C). Line two half-sheet pans with parchment paper. Create 2-inch (5 cm) balls – we like using a trusty scoop -and space 6 of them evenly apart on each prepared pans (see images). Top with extra pieces of chocolate. Keep extra dough chilled as first batches bake.

  6. Bake cookies, rotating pans top to bottom and front to back halfway through, until edges are golden brown, but centers are still a bit soft, 8 to 10 minutes. Remove pans from oven and tap on a sturdy heatproof surface to slightly deflate cookies. Immediately sprinkle with extra salt and cool pans on racks. Repeat with remaining dough.
  7. Cookies are amazing slightly warm and once cooled can be stored at room temperature in an airtight container for up to 3 days.

Tips

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

  • Buckwheat Flour: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested buckwheat flour. Monash states that a low FODMAP Green Light portion is 2/3 cup (100 g, which is a very generous amount. FODMAP Friendly gives it a “Pass” at 2 tablespoons or 14 g. Buckwheat flour, by the way, is gluten-free.
  • Butter: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested butter. Monash states that a low FODMAP Green Light portion is 1 tablespoon or 19 g and also states that “butter is high in fat and does not contain carbohydrates (FODMAPs)”. FODMAP Friendly gives it a “Pass” at 1 tablespoon or 19 g. Both recommended serving sizes are presented as part of healthy eating guidelines, not as maximum FODMAP serving size. Fat can affect guy motility and trigger IBS symptoms in some people. Eat to your tolerance.
  • Chocolate: Monash University has lab tested dark, milk and white chocolate all have low FODMAP amounts: 85% dark at 20 g; dark at 30 g; milk at 20 g; white at 25 g.
  • Sugar: Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested white, granulated sugar. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving size of white sugar is 1/4 cup (50 g). FODMAP Friendly simply states that they have tested 1 tablespoon and that it is low FODMAP. Regular granulated white sugar is sucrose, which is a disaccharide made up of equal parts glucose and fructose. Sucrose is broken down and absorbed efficiently in the small intestine.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Course: Dessert, Treat
Cuisine: American

Nutrition

Calories: 159kcal | Carbohydrates: 23g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 7g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 168mg | Potassium: 31mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 14g | Calcium: 2mg | Iron: 1mg

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.