Recipes | Comfort Food

Low FODMAP Scalloped Potatoes

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Low FODMAP Scalloped Potatoes are just like the classic dish, featuring starchy potatoes, cream and salt and pepper. Simple to make and serious comfort food. The scalloped potatoes are at home next to your favorite roasted meat or poultry. Fancy enough for guests but also easy enough for a homestyle meal. You can use russet potatoes, or a blend of russet and Yukon Gold potatoes.

overhead image of scalloped potatoes in blue oval dish with spoon alongside
Rich, creamy Low FODMAP Scalloped Potatoes!

If you are looking for a potato gratin featuring cheese, and/or mushrooms, we have those recipes as well.

We love these scalloped potatoes with roast leg of lamb for a holiday meal.

vertical image of Low FODMAP Boneless Leg of Lamb, plated with scalloped potatoes and carrots on white plate; flowered napkin; green tabletop surface
This tasty plate showcases our Slow Roasted Leg of Lamb and Lemon Honey Pan-Roasted Carrots, along with the scalloped potatoes.

Frequently Asked Questions

What Kind Of Potatoes Are Best?

We love all kinds of potatoes and luckily we can eat very generous servings even during the Elimination Phase. For this recipe I prefer starchy, russet potatoes, or a blend of russet potatoes and Yukon Gold. Yukon Gold are halfway between russet and waxy potatoes, and I do not recommend you use a waxy style potato, such as a red skin potato for this dish. It will not give you the richness in texture that you need.

Is Cream Low FODMAP?

Hopefully by now you know that FODMAPs are carbohydrates and heavy cream, which is the type of cream called for in this recipe, is considered a fat. There are no FODMAPs in fat. We have an article for you called All About Cream & FODMAPs that we suggest you review at this time. 
 
You can use conventional heavy cream for this recipe or, if you have access to lactose-free, you can certainly use that as well. If you stick to the serving size as suggested, the recipe is low FODMAP either way.

Can I Make This Dish Low Fat?

Here’s the deal with scalloped potatoes…It is a rich dish. Fat is not a problem from a FODMAP perspective, but it can be an IBS trigger for some folks. Always eat to your tolerances. Consider this dish a low FODMAP but high fat dish, to be enjoyed (if you can) on occasion. How about a holiday meal?

Or, you could try to make this with fat-free half-and-half, but I cannot guarantee the results.
 

Can I Add Herbs?

We have purposely left this recipe simply seasoned with salt and pepper (please make sure to use kosher salt and freshly ground pepper for best flavor), but you absolutely can add some herbs. A sprinkling of fresh or dried thyme is lovely and can be added along with the cream, salt and pepper.
 
By the way, I do not always provide amounts in the ingredient list for salt and pepper because I often ask you to season to taste. In this recipe I have given you amounts because it is important that the potatoes receive enough seasoning, and this gives you a guide.

How To Make The Richest Potatoes You Will Ever Eat

Position rack in middle of oven. Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C). Butter the bottom and insides of a 3-quart (or 13-inch by 9-inch/33 cm by 23 cm) ceramic or ovenproof glass baking dish. (I used this gorgeous one from Emile Henry).

oval blue casserole dish, buttered

Peel the potatoes and slice them crosswise very thinly, to about ¼-inch (6mm) thick. A mandoline will give you the most control, yielding nice round slices – and make quick work out of it. 

showing 1/4-inch thick sliced potato; mandoline in background

Regardless of how you slice the potatoes, make sure that they are all evenly sliced as this will help the dish bake most evenly.

1/4-inch thick sliced potatoes on white surface

Measure out your cream into a large measuring cup and whisk in the salt and pepper.

cream in measuring cup with salt and pepper; sliced potatoes in casserole dish alongside

Place the potatoes in the prepare dish in an overlapping fashion. You can see in our images that ours are somewhat stood upright, which gives a nice visual effect.

overhead image of sliced potatoes in blue casserole dish

Pour the cream all over the top.

scalloped potatoes in oval dish, ready to bake

Bake uncovered for about 40 to 50 minutes or until the top is lightly browned. Let’s sit 5 minutes before serving. Get ready to swoon.

overhead image of scalloped potatoes in blue oval dish

FODMAP Information

All recipes are based upon Monash University & FODMAP Friendly science at time of initial publication.

  • Dairy: The low FODMAP diet is not a dairy-free diet. It is however, low in lactose. Many dairy ingredients are low in lactose, such as heavy cream and many cheeses.
  • Potatoes: Potatoes have been lab tested and deemed low FODMAP by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly. According to Monash, starchy baking potatoes, red-skinned, yellow-skinned and purple potatoes contain no FODMAPs.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. Foods will be retested from time to time; in the case of raw ingredients, such as fruits and vegetables, results may vary. All lab tested results are valid and represent a snapshot in time. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome

overhead image of scalloped potatoes in blue oval dish with spoon alongside
5 from 4 votes

Low FODMAP Scalloped Potatoes

Low FODMAP Scalloped Potatoes are just like the classic dish, featuring starchy potatoes, cream and salt and pepper. Simple to make and serious comfort food. The scalloped potatoes are at home next to your favorite roasted meat or poultry. Fancy enough for guests but also easy enough for a homestyle meal. You can use russet potatoes, or a blend of russet and Yukon Gold potatoes.

Makes: 12 Servings
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 50 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 3- pounds (1.4 kg) russet potatoes, or a blend of russet and Yukon Gold
  • 3 cups (720 ml) heavy cream, lactose-free if available
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Preparation:

  1. Position rack in middle of oven. Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C). Butter the bottom and insides of a 3-quart (or 13-inch by 9-inch/33 cm by 23 cm) ceramic or ovenproof glass baking dish.
  2. Peel the potatoes and slice them crosswise very thinly, to about ¼-inch (6mm) thick. A mandoline will give you the most control, yielding nice round slices – and make quick work out of it. Regardless of how you slice the potatoes, make sure that they are all evenly sliced as this will help the dish bake most evenly.
  3. Measure out your cream into a large measuring cup and whisk in the salt and pepper.
  4. Place the potatoes in the prepare dish in an overlapping fashion. You can see in our images that ours are somewhat stood upright, which gives a nice visual effect. Pour the cream all over the top.
  5. Bake uncovered for about 40 to 50 minutes or until the top is lightly browned. Let’s sit 5 minutes before serving. Get ready to swoon.

Notes:

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

• Dairy: The low FODMAP diet is not a dairy-free diet. It is however, low in lactose. Many dairy ingredients are low in lactose, such as heavy cream and many cheeses.
• Potatoes: Potatoes have been lab tested and deemed low FODMAP by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly. According to Monash, starchy baking potatoes, red-skinned, yellow-skinned and purple potatoes contain no FODMAPs.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. Foods will be retested from time to time; in the case of raw ingredients, such as fruits and vegetables, results may vary. All lab tested results are valid and represent a snapshot in time. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: American

Nutrition

Calories: 301kcal | Carbohydrates: 23g | Protein: 4g | Fat: 14g | Sodium: 388mg | Potassium: 1mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 1g | Calcium: 1mg | Iron: 1mg

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.