Recipes | Sauces, Salsas & Condiments

Low FODMAP Hot and Tangy BBQ Sauce

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This Low FODMAP Hot and Tangy BBQ Sauce is definitely tangy, with a vinegary bite, and the heat level can be adjusted to your liking. It is modeled after the “basic barbecue sauce” from Steven Raichlen’s The Barbecue Bible and is based on ketchup, canned tomato sauce, green bell pepper, brown sugar, two kinds of mustard, cider vinegar, scallion greens, a touch of molasses and liquid smoke flavoring. I have also included both FreeFod Onion Replacer and Garlic Replacer. Raichlen’s intent was a sauce that is not too sweet but that balances sour, spicy and smoky. (If you like sweet BBQ sauce check out our Sweet and Sticky BBQ Sauce or our Blackberry Maple BBQ Sauce). This sauce can be left chunky or puréed. The images are of it puréed.

Hot and Tangy BBQ sauce in glass dish with spoon

Ketchup & Tomato Sauce

There are two tomato products in this BBQ sauce – ketchup and tomato sauce. Let’s look at them one at a time.

Monash has lab tested both ketchup with and without high fructose corn syrup. And, their low FODMAP serving size is the same; low FODMAP at 13 g portions for both. Monash says this is equal to “1 sachet”, which we have weighed and measured, and 13 g is equal to 2 ¼ teaspoons.

Fody has a “low FODMAP” ketchup that is lab tested and certified by Monash, but the serving size is just 17 g, which is 1 U.S. tablespoon.

There is not that much of a difference between conventional ketchup and low FODMAP ketchup. We use Heinz Ketchup in the Test Kitchen for recipe testing.

Canned Tomato Sauce without high FODMAP ingredients can be found, but you have to read labels. For our recipe I used the 365 brand from Whole Foods, but you can even find brands with no onion and garlic (which is in so many of them) at Walmart. But read the labels!

Here you can see the front of the label:

can of tomato sauce held in hand

And here is the ingredient list – no onion or garlic!

label of canned tomato sauce, held in hand. Look for No onions and No garlic

Liquid Smoke

I was suspicious about liquid smoke for years. It just seemed like it had to be some sort of artificial, chemical product. Even the name of the product – “liquid smoke” – just sounded wrong. Turn out I was wrong! According to the Colgin Company, which has been bottling liquid smoke since obtaining patent #2129047 for Smoke Flavoring Condiments in 1938, liquid smoke is made by channeling smoke from smoldering wood chips through a condenser. The mixture then quickly cools into vapor, which causes droplets to liquefy and then the water-soluble flavor compounds in the smoke are trapped within this liquid. Non-soluble, carcinogenic tars and resins are removed by a series of filters. The finished product, the liquid smoke, is a clean and clear smoke-flavored liquid. All natural. Look for brands that have a very simple ingredient label: smoke and water; I like Wright’s.

Garlic & Onion Flavor

Garlic and onions contain fructans, which can be big IBS triggers for many. As soon as I got ahold of FreeFod Onion Replacer and the Garlic Replacer I knew BBQ sauces were going to be some of the first things I would make.

These FreeFod products are powdered and can be used somewhat similarly to garlic and onion powders. They are lab tested and certified low FODMAP by FODMAP Friendly. You can make this Low FODMAP Hot and Tangy BBQ Sauce without them, but it will not be the same. We highly recommend you try them.

Low FODMAP Hot and Tangy BBQ sauce in a clear glass dish on dark surface

Molasses & FODMAPs

Molasses is low FODMAP in 1 teaspoon amounts. Our recipe calls for 2 tablespoons total, which is 6 teaspoons. Our serving size keeps you well below that limit.

Our BBQ Sauce Is Not Vegetarian Or Vegan

Worcestershire sauce contains anchovies; therefore, the finished sauce is not vegan or vegetarian.

If you want a substitute, you could try soy sauce, but the finished overall flavor balance of the BBQ sauce will be different; but it is your choice!

Here is our sauce on a slider! Check out that recipe for Low FODMAP BBQ Pork Sliders, which, BTW, works great with chicken, too.

man holding metal tray with BBQ sliders

More BBQ Sauces

Make sure to check out these additional BBQ sauce recipes:

 

Hot and Tangy BBQ sauce in glass dish with spoon
5 from 1 vote

Low FODMAP Hot and Tangy BBQ Sauce

This Low FODMAP Hot and Tangy BBQ Sauce is definitely tangy, with a vinegary bite, and the heat level can be adjusted to your liking. It is modeled after the “basic barbecue sauce” from Steven Raichlen’s The Barbecue Bible and is based on ketchup, canned tomato sauce, green bell pepper, brown sugar, two kinds of mustard, cider vinegar, scallion greens, a touch of molasses and liquid smoke flavoring. I have also included both FreeFod Onion Replacer and Garlic Replacer. Raichlen’s intent was a sauce that is not too sweet but that balances sour, spicy and smoky. (If you like sweet BBQ sauce check out our Sweet and Sticky BBQ Sauce). This sauce can be left chunky or puréed. The images are of it puréed. 

Low FODMAP Serving Size Info: Makes about 2 cups (480 ml); serving size 2 tablespoons; approximately 16 servings

Makes: 16 Servings
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

Preparation:

  1. Heat oil over low-medium heat in a large saucepan, add finely chopped scallion greens and green bell peppers and sauté for a few minutes to soften. Whisk in the ketchup, tomato sauce, brown sugar, vinegar, Worcestershire sauce, lemon juice, molasses, both mustards, hot sauce, chipotle, liquid smoke and paprika. Measure out your water and whisk in the FreeFod Garlic Replacer and FreeFod Onion Replacer until dissolved, then whisk into the pot. Bring to a simmer over low-medium heat and cook for 5 minutes, whisking often. Taste, season with salt and pepper and adjust flavor balance. You might want a little more sugar or vinegar, hot pepper sauce or smoke. Cool the sauce.
  2. The sauce can be left as is, which is a little textured, or puréed. You can purée right in the pot with an immersion blender or use a traditional blender and blend until smooth. BBQ sauce is ready to use, or you may refrigerate it in an airtight container for up to 1 week. Whisk before using.

Tips

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

  • Garlic-Infused Oil: Make your own Garlic-Infused Oil or buy a commercial equivalent for the easiest way to add garlic flavor to your food. Fructans in garlic are not oil-soluble, so garlic-infused oil is low FODMAP.
  • Green Bell Peppers: Green bell peppers have been lab tested by Monash University and are recommended in low FODMAP amounts of ½ cup or 52 g. FODMAP Friendly has lab tested green bell peppers and states that 1 small pepper at 75 g is low FODMAP.
  • Lemon Juice: Monash University has lab tested lemon juice and it is low FODMAP in ½ cup (125 g) amounts.
  • Scallions: The green parts of scallions are low FODMAP as determined by Monash University lab testing and can be used to add onion flavor to your low FODMAP cooking.
  • Sugar: Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested white, granulated sugar. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving size of white sugar is ¼ cup (50 g). FODMAP Friendly simply states that they have tested 1 tablespoon and that it is low FODMAP. Regular granulated white sugar is sucrose, which is a disaccharide made up of equal parts glucose and fructose. Sucrose is broken down and absorbed efficiently in the small intestine.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Course: Basic, Condiment, Sauce
Cuisine: American

Nutrition

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.