Recipes | Cookies, Brownies & Bars

Low FODMAP Nutella Brownies

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Did you know that we have Low FODMAP Nutella? We sure do, and it is easy to make. And once you have a batch on hand, try our Low FODMAP Nutella Banana Muffins and these Low FODMAP Nutella Brownies.

close up of a low FODMAP Nutella Brownies held in hand

Quick & Easy

Hopefully you have noticed that we have a Recipe Filter and among other things, you can search for Quick and also for Easy recipes. What does that mean?

Our Quick recipes can get on the table in 30 minutes or less of prep and cooking time. Our Easy recipes have 15 minutes or less of prep. Sometimes recipes are both!

This recipe is one of those baking recipes that you can prep in the time it takes for the oven to preheat. If you think baking is hard and long and complicated, this recipe might change your mind.

side shot of pyramid stack of low FODMAP Nutella Brownies on white plate, white backgroundl purple flowers in white vase
Even non-FODMAPers will swoon over these Nutella swirled brownies.

Is Nutella Low FODMAP?

Our recipe for Low FODMAP Nutella is, and also happens to be vegan. These brownies are not vegan, but the Nutella itself is, which might be of interest to you. 

Can I Make These With Real Nutella?

You could try, but I have not and cannot vouch for the textural and taste results. In addition, the FODMAP load would change as well. Whenever you make changes to a low FODMAP recipe you have to remain aware that you are also very likely affecting its FODMAP status.

Is Cocoa Low FODMAP?

Cocoa does have low FODMAP serving sizes and all of our recipes that call for cocoa take this into consideration. Unfortunately, there are some discrepancies on the Monash app, which I discuss at length in our article All About Cocoa. The short story is that they have very different numbers for “cacao” and “cocoa”, and they are the same thing. Can cocoas be different from one another? Of course they can and I explain it all in that article.

overhead view pyramid stack of low FODMAP Nutella Brownies on white plate, white background

How To Make Low FODMAP Nutella Brownies

Position rack in center of oven. Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C). Coat the inside of a 9-inch (23 cm) square baking pan with nonstick spray, then line the bottom and two sides with parchment, leaving an overhang on two sides.

Beat the butter and brown sugar together with an electric mixer until smooth and creamy, scraping down bowl once or twice.

creamed butter and brown sugar in bowl

Beat in the vanilla, then beat in the eggs one at a time, allowing each to become incorporated. Beat in 1 cup (266 g) Low FODMAP Nutella until smooth and creamy. Scrape down the sides and up bottom of bowl as needed.

Beat in flour and salt on slow speed until a few floury streaks remain (see image below), then use a silicone spatula to fold the flour in completely.

Making brownie batter in stand mixer with flat paddle

Scrape the batter into prepared baking pan, smoothing the top; I use a small offset spatula.

raw brownie batter in pan, top smoothed with icing spatula

Drop small spoonfuls of the remaining ¼ cup (66 g) Nutella on top evenly across the batter.

Nutella dolloped onto raw brownie batter in pan before baking

Swirl in using a bamboo skewer or butter knife – or the tip of that offset spatula.

Nutella swirled into raw brownie batter in pan before baking

Bake the brownies for about 12 to 20 minutes. I know 12 minutes doesn’t seem long, and they will probably take at least 15 minutes BUT these bake quickly, and they can dry out easily. Many batches at 20 minutes were over-done. A toothpick inserted in the center should have moist crumbs clinging and not come out clean.

baked Nutella Brownies in pan; you can see where I inserted a toothpick to test doneness

Cool pan on rack for a few minutes then place in fridge to quickly chill them down, which halts residual heat. (When I made these in the winter, I put them on my outdoor porch!) Cool completely in the pan then use the parchment to lift them out, remove parchment and cut into a 6 by 6 grid for 36 brownies. Store in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 3 days. They can also be frozen for up to 1 month. Double wrap in plastic wrap, then place in a zip-top bag. 

pyramid stack of low FODMAP Nutella Brownies on white plate, white background; Nutella in mason jar
These moist brownies are for hazelnut and chocolate lovers.

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science. 

  • Butter: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested butter. Monash states that a low FODMAP Green Light portion is 1 tablespoon or 19 g and also states that “butter is high in fat and does not contain carbohydrates (FODMAPs)”. FODMAP Friendly gives it a “Pass” at 1 tablespoon or 19 g. Both recommended serving sizes are presented as part of healthy eating guidelines, not as maximum FODMAP serving size. Fat can affect guy motility and trigger IBS symptoms in some people. Eat to your tolerance.
  • Cocoa: Monash University has lab tested what they call “cocoa” and also “cacao” and they show different FODMAP content. The problem is that from the chocolate manufacturing industry’s perspective, there is no difference between cacao and cocoa powder. The FDA, The Food Standards for Australia and New Zealand, the ICCO (International Cocoa Organization) and the National Confectioners Association do not even recognize the term “cacao” to describe cocoa powder. We have an article, All About Cocoa, that we encourage you to read. It attempts to explain the discrepancies in the Monash lab testing.
  • Sugar: Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested white, granulated sugar. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving size of white sugar is ¼ cup (50 g). FODMAP Friendly simply states that they have tested 1 tablespoon and that it is low FODMAP. Regular granulated white sugar is sucrose, which is a disaccharide made up of equal parts glucose and fructose. Sucrose is broken down and absorbed efficiently in the small intestine. 

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

bite taken out of a low FODMAP Nutella Brownie, held in manicured hand
Come on…take a bite!
close up of a low FODMAP Nutella Brownies held in hand
5 from 1 vote

Low FODMAP Nutella Brownies

 Did you know that we have Low FODMAP Nutella? We sure do, and it is easy to make. And once you have a batch on hand, try our Low FODMAP Nutella Banana Muffins and these Low FODMAP Nutella Brownies.

Low FODMAP Serving Size Info: Makes 36 brownies; 36 servings; 1 brownie per serving

Makes: 36 Servings
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

  • 5 tablespoons (71g) unsalted butter, cut into pieces, at room temperature
  • ½ cup (107 g) packed light brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 2 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 1 and ¼ cups (332g) Low FODMAP Nutella, divided
  • 2/3 cup (96 g) low FODMAP gluten-free all-purpose flour, such as Bob’s Red Mill 1 to 1 Baking Flour
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt

Preparation:

  1. Position rack in center of oven. Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C). Coat the inside of a 9-inch (23 cm) square baking pan with nonstick spray, then line the bottom and two sides with parchment, leaving an overhang on two sides.
  2. Beat the butter with an electric mixer until smooth and creamy. Beat in brown sugar until lightened in color, soft and creamy, scraping down bowl once or twice. Beat in the vanilla, then beat in the eggs one at a time, allowing each to become incorporated.
  3. Beat in 1 cup (266 g) Nutella until smooth and creamy. Scrape down the sides and up bottom of bowl as needed. Beat in flour and salt on slow speed until a few floury streaks remain, then use a silicone spatula to fold the flour in completely.
  4. Scrape the batter into prepared baking pan, smoothing the top; I use a small offset spatula. Drop small spoonfuls of the remaining ¼ cup (66 g) Nutella on top evenly across the batter. Swirl in using a bamboo skewer or butter knife – or the tip of that offset spatula.
  5. Bake the brownies for about 12 to 20 minutes. I know 12 minutes doesn’t seem long, and they will probably take at least 15 minutes BUT these bake quickly, and they can dry out easily. Many batches at 20 minutes were over-done. A toothpick inserted in the center should have moist crumbs clinging and not come out clean.
  6. Cool pan on rack for a few minutes then place in fridge to quickly chill them down, which halts residual heat. (When I made these in the winter, I put them on my outdoor porch!) Cool completely in the pan then use the parchment to lift them out, remove parchment and cut into a 6 by 6 grid for 36 brownies. Store in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 3 days. They can also be frozen for up to 1 month. Double wrap in plastic wrap, then place in a zip-top bag.

Notes:

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

  • Butter: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested butter. Monash states that a low FODMAP Green Light portion is 1 tablespoon or 19 g and also states that “butter is high in fat and does not contain carbohydrates (FODMAPs)”. FODMAP Friendly gives it a “Pass” at 1 tablespoon or 19 g. Both recommended serving sizes are presented as part of healthy eating guidelines, not as maximum FODMAP serving size. Fat can affect guy motility and trigger IBS symptoms in some people. Eat to your tolerance.
  • Cocoa: Monash University has lab tested what they call “cocoa” and also “cacao” and they show different FODMAP content. The problem is that from the chocolate manufacturing industry’s perspective, there is no difference between cacao and cocoa powder. The FDA, The Food Standards for Australia and New Zealand, the ICCO (International Cocoa Organization) and the National Confectioners Association do not even recognize the term “cacao” to describe cocoa powder. We have an article, All About Cocoa, that we encourage you to read. It attempts to explain the discrepancies in the Monash lab testing.
  • Sugar: Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested white, granulated sugar. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving size of white sugar is ¼ cup (50 g). FODMAP Friendly simply states that they have tested 1 tablespoon and that it is low FODMAP. Regular granulated white sugar is sucrose, which is a disaccharide made up of equal parts glucose and fructose. Sucrose is broken down and absorbed efficiently in the small intestine.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Course: Dessert, Snack, Treat
Cuisine: American

Nutrition

Calories: 66kcal | Carbohydrates: 6g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 4g | Sodium: 11mg | Potassium: 1mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 3g | Calcium: 1mg | Iron: 1mg

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.