Recipes | Breads, Muffins & Biscuits

Low FODMAP Olive Oil Muffins with Goat Cheese, Raspberries & Walnuts

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Baking doesn’t always have to be super-sweet, even when there are sweet components. These Low FODMAP Olive Oil Muffins are a perfect example. There is brown sugar, orange zest and raspberries, but these ingredients are balanced with savory olive oil, goat cheese and walnuts. These just might be the perfect breakfast, brunch or snack muffin. They freeze well, too!

Main image of Low FODMAP Olive Oil Muffins with Goat Cheese, Walnuts and Raspberries; blue backdrop and blue plate

Olive Oil Is Low FODMAP

Olive oil is a fat and contains no FODMAPs. All oils are safe, but we use olive oil here to lend its flavor to these sweet and savory muffins. You can use extra-virgin olive oil, or even just one labeled “olive oil” for this recipe.

vertical overhead of Low FODMAP Olive Oil Muffins with Goat Cheese, Walnuts and Raspberries in a round antique cooling rack

First Things First

You will notice that the first step is to make your “faux buttermilk”, which is simply whole lactose-free milk combined with lemon juice. After it sits for a few minutes, it will curdle and thicken, which is what you want. We do this because we have never been able to find commercially prepared lactose-free buttermilk. If you find some, let us know!

Low FODMAP Olive Oil Muffins with Goat Cheese, Walnuts and Raspberries on a blue plate; bit into

Raspberries & FODMAPs

Raspberries have been lab tested by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly. FODMAP Friendly gives them a “Pass” at 10 berries or 45 g. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving is 30 berries or 60 g. The amount in each muffin is well within low FODMAP limits. Enjoy your fruit!

closeup of Low FODMAP Olive Oil Muffins with Goat Cheese, Walnuts and Raspberries in a round antique cooling rack; blue backdrop and blue plate

Walnuts & Low FODMAP Olive Oil Muffins

Nuts are complicated when it comes to FODMAPs. When you look them up on the Monash app there is often that scary looking RED LIGHT and so many folks stop there and think that there are no low FODMAP servings of nuts that can be enjoyed during Elimination.

BUT you have you read the fine print. And, some nuts get a GREEN LIGHT right out of the box, like walnuts. Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested walnuts. FODMAP Friendly gives them a “Pass” at ¼ cup (30 g) portions. Monash lists the same gram amount as low FODMAP and pegs the volume at 10 walnut halves. Again, our recipe, if you stick the suggested serving size, is well within low FODMAP recommendations.

Low FODMAP Olive Oil Muffins with Goat Cheese, Walnuts and Raspberries in a round antique cooling rack; blue backdrop and on blue plate 2

Goat Cheese & FODMAPs

Many firm and semi-firm cheeses have generous low FODMAP portions. And even some softer cheeses do too, like cream cheese and cottage cheese.

Check out our article, Is Cheese Low FODMAP? to learn how you can tell if any cheese is low FODMAP.

For these Low FODMAP Olive Oil Muffins I call for a soft goat cheese that you can crumble, like a Montrachet. If you get home and the cheese you bought is more spreadable than crumble-able, don’t worry. Just use a couple of teaspoons to scoop little bits of cheese into and onto the muffin batter.

closeup of Low FODMAP Olive Oil Muffins with Goat Cheese, Walnuts and Raspberries in a round antique cooling rack;

Main image of Low FODMAP Olive Oil Muffins with Goat Cheese, Walnuts and Raspberries; blue backdrop and blue plate
5 from 1 vote

Low FODMAP Olive Oil Muffins with Goat Cheese, Raspberries & Walnuts

Baking doesn’t always have to be super-sweet, even when there are sweet components. These Low FODMAP Olive Oil Muffins are a perfect example. There is brown sugar, orange zest and raspberries, but these ingredients are balanced with savory olive oil, goat cheese and walnuts. These just might be the perfect breakfast, brunch or snack muffin. They freeze well, too!

Low FODMAP Serving Size Info: Makes 12 muffins; serving size 1 muffin

Makes: 12 Servings
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup (240 ml) lactose-free whole milk, at room temperature
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 2 cups (290 g) low FODMAP gluten-free all-purpose flour, such as Bob’s Red Mill 1 to 1 Baking Flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder; use gluten-free if following a gluten-free diet
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 3 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 3/4 cup (160 g) firmly packed light brown sugar
  • 1/3 cup (75 ml) olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon orange zest, prepared with a Microplane
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 cup (123 g) fresh raspberries, chopped, plus 12 more whole berries
  • 1/2 cup (50 g) chopped toasted walnuts
  • 5- ounces (140 g) soft goat cheese, such as Montrachet, crumbled

Preparation:

  1. Position rack in center of oven. Preheat oven to 425°F (220°C). Line 12 muffin cups with paper liners or coat with nonstick spray.
  2. Stir the milk and lemon juice together in your measuring cup and set aside to thicken, about 5 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a large bowl. Make a well in the center and set aside.
  4. Whisk together eggs and brown sugar until combined. Add the thickened, soured milk, olive oil, orange zest and vanilla and whisk until smooth.
  5. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and stir with a large silicone spatula until just combined. Fold in 1 cup (123 g) of berries and about three-quarters of the walnuts.
  6. Spoon about half the batter into the prepared muffin cups (you can do this by eye). Using half of the goat cheese, crumble it and divide amongst the muffins. Top with the remaining batter, then crumble over remaining goat cheese and walnuts and top each muffin with a reserved whole raspberry.
  7. Bake the muffins for about 12 to 15 minutes or until the tops spring back when gently pressed. (Check halfway through, rotate the pan and cover with foil if they are browning too quickly). When done the edges will be golden brown and will just be starting to come away from the pan. Cool in pan on rack for about 3 minutes, then unmold to rack to cool further, placing the muffins upright. Muffins are wonderful slightly warm and best served the day they are made. You can freeze them in a heavy zip-top bag for up to a month. Heat gently before serving.

Tips

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

  • Cheese: Many cheeses have low FODMAP serving sizes. The low FODMAP diet is not a dairy-free diet. Hard cheeses such as Parmigiano Reggiano or Pecorino Romano have been lab tested by Monash University and are low FODMAP in 40 g amounts.
  • Oil: All pure oils are fats and contain no carbohydrates, therefore they contain no FODMAPs.
  • Raspberries: Raspberries have been lab tested by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly. FODMAP Friendly gives them a “Pass” at 10 berries or 45 g. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving is 30 berries or 60 g. In their tests the fruit jumped to Moderate FODMAP levels quickly at 35 berries or 65 g.
  • Walnuts: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested walnuts. FODMAP Friendly gives them a “Pass” at ¼ cup (30 g) portions. Monash lists the same gram amount as low FODMAP and pegs the volume at 10 walnut halves.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Course: Breakfast, brunch, Snack
Cuisine: American

Nutrition

Calories: 294kcal | Carbohydrates: 36g | Protein: 6g | Fat: 14g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 153mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 14g | Vitamin C: 1mg | Iron: 1mg

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.