Recipes | Cookies, Brownies & Bars

Low FODMAP One-Bowl Brownies

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What’s better than moist chocolaty brownies? Our Low FODMAP One-Bowl Brownies that you can whip up in less time than it takes to preheat the oven. This brownie recipe uses natural cocoa powder for a rich chocolate taste and trust us, they are MUCH more than their looks. They might look “plain”, but their chocolaty flavor and moist texture are anything but. In about 30-minutes you can be eating made-from-scratch brownies that just happen to be gluten-free and low FODMAP.

close overhead image of low FODMAP One Bowl Brownies piled on black plate; fresh flowers in background

Cocoa & FODMAPs

Oh boy. This is a HUGE topic for me. Cocoa and FODMAPs. Perhaps you have noticed that cocoa and “cacao” are listed separately on the Monash app, and that they show different amounts of FODMAP content.

PLEASE read our article All About Cocoa & FODMAPs, which goes into this in depth.

The fact is that there is no difference between cocoa and “cacao” and the article explains it all. In short, from the chocolate manufacturing industry’s perspective, there is no difference between cacao and cocoa powder. The FDA, The Food Standards for Australia and New Zealand, the ICCO (International Cocoa Organization) and the National Confectioners Association do not even recognize the term “cacao” to describe cocoa powder. Our article attempts to explain the discrepancies in the Monash lab testing.

one bowl brownies in a pile on a black plate

What we want to be focused on for this recipe is what type of cocoa to use and I suggest natural cocoa. Natural cocoa and Dutch-processed cocoa (and black cocoa for that matter) all react differently in recipes. Please always use what is called for – in this instance natural cocoa. The All About Cocoa article shows you images of all the various kinds of cocoa, too, which is kind of cool. Have you ever seen black cocoa? Come take a look.

closeup image of one bowl brownie held in hand, bite taken out; flowers in background

Vanilla Extract

Vanilla extract might seem like a throwaway ingredient – in the sense that it appears to be an extra that might not actually be needed. It is true that you could leave it out of many recipes and still end up with something that you like.

But in recipes like this, where there are relatively few flavor enhancing ingredients, it really should be included and not overlooked.

Sure, I have read all the studies about artificial vanilla doing very well in side-by-side taste-tests. And artificial vanilla extract is much less expensive. After years and years of owning a bakery, and being a professional pastry chef, I just can’t bring myself to use it.

I guess what I am saying is that if you only have artificial around, you can use it. It will not change the FODMAP load, but I am partial to pure vanilla extract.

vertical image of pile of one bowl brownes in black plate; flowers in background

How To Make Low FODMAP One-Bowl Brownies

Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C). Line 8-inch (20 cm) square aluminum baking pan with parchment paper so that it overhangs two sides.

prepped 8-inch (20 cm) pan

Melt the butter in a microwave safe bowl that is large enough to accommodate all of your ingredients.

melted butter in glass bowl

Whisk in the sugar and vanilla extract.

whisking sugar and vanilla extract into melted butter in clear glass bowl

I like to add vanilla extract before eggs as it has a better shot at incorporating with the fat (butter) and that disperses its flavor very well. The ingredients come together easily.

sugar and vanilla whisked into melted butter in glass bowl

Then whisk in eggs one at a time.

whisking eggs into butter sugar mixture in clear glass bowl

Make sure the eggs are incorporated.

2nd egg whisked into butter sugar mixture

Whisk in cocoa

add natural cocoa to butter sugar egg mixture in glass bowl

…until mixture is well combined.

whisk cocoa into on bowl brownie mixture in glass bowl

Add flour and salt.

get a silicone spatula ready to fold flour into brownie batterSwitch to a silicone spatula and fold in until all the ingredients are completely combined. Here is what it looks like about halfway mixed.

folding flour and salt into brownie batter in clear glass bowl

Keep going until it looks smooth and well blended.

one bowl brownie batter in glass bowl with pale pink silicone spatula

Scrape into prepared pan.

one bowl brownie batter in square pan lined with parchment paper

Bake for about 20 minutes or until a toothpick or bamboo skewer inserted in the center shows a few crumbs clinging. Do NOT bake until the toothpick tests clean. That will be “over done”. See the tiny hole where I inserted a skewer to test doneness?

baked brownies in square pan showing tiny hole where I tested for doneness

Cool pan on rack. Use overhanging paper to help remove brownies from pan.

Cut into 16 squares and enjoy!

low FODMAP One Bowl Brownies piled on black plate; fresh flowers in background

Other One-Bowl Treats!

close overhead image of low FODMAP One Bowl Brownies piled on black plate; fresh flowers in background
4.5 from 2 votes

Low FODMAP One-Bowl Brownies

What’s better than moist chocolaty brownies? Our Low FODMAP One-Bowl Brownies that you can whip up in less time than it takes to preheat the oven. This brownie recipe uses natural cocoa powder for a rich chocolate taste and trust us, they are MUCH more than their looks. They might look “plain”, but their chocolaty flavor and moist texture are anything but. In about 30-minutes you can be eating made-from-scratch brownies that just happen to be gluten-free and low FODMAP.

Low FODMAP Serving Size Info: Makes 8-inch (20 cm) squate pan; 16 brownies; 1 brownie per serving

Makes: 16 Servings
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

Preparation:

  1. Position rack in middle of oven. Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C). Line an 8-inch (20 cm) square metal baking pan with parchment paper overhanging two sides. Coat paper and pan with nonstick spray.
  2. Melt the butter in a large microwave safe bowl in your microwave. I cover the butter with the waxed paper from the stick to keep it from splattering. (If you don’t have the use of a microwave you can melt the butter on the stove in a small pot then transfer to a mixing bowl).
  3. Whisk in the sugar and vanilla, then whisk in the eggs one at a time until absorbed. Whisk in the cocoa then switch to a large silicone spatula and fold in the flour and salt until all ingredients are well combined.
  4. Scrape into prepared pan, smooth the top if necessary and bake for approximately 18 to 25 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the center shows a few moist crumbs clinging. Do not bake until a toothpick tests clean. Cool pan on rack. Use overhanging parchment to remove brownies from pan and cut into a 4 by 4 grid to make 16 brownies. Brownies are amazing served right away but may also be wrapped airtight and stored at room temperature for 2 days.

Tips

• You can freeze the brownies, although I am not a huge fan of freezing baked goods as they are always better fresh. Wrap them individually with plastic wrap then place those in a zip-top bag and remove the air. Freeze for up to 1 month.

Variations:

• You can add ½ cup (55 g) chopped toasted walnuts or pecans.
• Or you could add ½ cup (85 g) semi-sweet chocolate chips.
• Try adding ½ teaspoon powdered instant espresso along with the cocoa.
• Or even try a large pinch of cinnamon to the batter.

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

  • Cocoa: Monash University has lab tested what they call “cocoa” and also “cacao” and they show different FODMAP content. The problem is that from the chocolate manufacturing industry’s perspective, there is no difference between cacao and cocoa powder. The FDA, The Food Standards for Australia and New Zealand, the ICCO (International Cocoa Organization) and the National Confectioners Association do not even recognize the term “cacao” to describe cocoa powder. We have an article, All About Cocoa, that we encourage you to read. It attempts to explain the discrepancies in the Monash lab testing.
  • Sugar: Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested white, granulated sugar. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving size of white sugar is 1/4 cup (50 g). FODMAP Friendly simply states that they have tested 1 tablespoon and that it is low FODMAP. Regular granulated white sugar is sucrose, which is a disaccharide made up of equal parts glucose and fructose. Sucrose is broken down and absorbed efficiently in the small intestine.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Course: Dessert, Snack, Treat
Cuisine: American

Nutrition

Calories: 141kcal | Carbohydrates: 20g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 7g | Sodium: 44mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 15g

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.