Recipes | Cookies, Brownies & Bars

Low FODMAP One-Bowl Peanut Butter Cookies

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Almost Instantaneous Peanut Butter Cookies

These Low FODMAP One-Bowl Peanut Butter Cookies are essentially the same cookies as the ones from my book, The Low-FODMAP Diet Step by Step, where I call them 3-Ingredient, 17-Second Cookies. This is because the original recipe contained just peanut butter (1), sugar (2) and an egg (3) and I once made them on live TV in 17 seconds.

Complete with someone running a stopwatch.

overhead image of one-bowl peanut butter cookies on white plateA Little Elbow Grease

These One-Bowl Peanut Butter Cookies are that easy, although since here I suggest making them by hand, you might have to beat them a little longer than 17 seconds.

(Using a stand-mixer makes them SUPER quick to make, which is what I did on live TV).

One-Bowl to Cookie Nirvana

This recipe joins our One-Bowl Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies,  Peanut Butter Oatmeal Chocolate Chunk and our One-Bowl Chocolate Chunk Cookies. You told us you really like a one-bowl cookie recipe, so we are going to keep bringing you more. I am thinking about a soft sugar cookie next…

Pick Your Peanut Butter

There are four basic types of peanut butter in U.S. markets. All are low FODMAP, but I do have my preferences.

  • Fresh ground to order from a machine in the supermarket – this is my least favorite. It tends to be dry and very textured and lacks consistency from batch to batch.
  • Peanut butter made with hydrogenated oils – why use a PB with hydrogenated oils? I don’t know why you would.
  • Natural peanut butter with “peanuts and salt” listed as ingredients – this is the kind of PB I eat every day and it makes a nice cookie. This is my very close second-favorite choice. It will make a cookie that is less sweet, that I like, but that is a tad drier.
  • Creamy “no-stir” style peanut butter containing peanuts, sugar, palm oil and salt – this is my favorite PB to use in these cookies. It makes a sweet cookie (sometimes seemingly a bit too sweet) but I like the resulting cookie texture the best.

YOU CHOOSE your favorite peanut butter – but I suggest one of the last two types for best results.

one bowl peanut butter cookies on a white plate with glass of lactose-free milk

one bowl peanut butter cookies on a white plate with glass of lactose-free milk
4.2 from 10 votes

One-Bowl Peanut Butter Cookies

We have several recipes for one-bowl cookies. All low FODMAP! These one bowl peanut butter cookies are in regular rotation in our homes!

Low FODMAP Serving Size Info: Makes 15 cookies; serving size 1 cookie

Makes: 15 cookies
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 12 minutes
Total Time: 17 minutes
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup (270 g) smooth, lightly salted natural peanut butter
  • 1 cup (198 g) sugar
  • 1 large egg, at room temperature
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda

Preparation:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F/180°C. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. Combine the peanut butter, sugar, egg and baking soda in a medium-size bowl and use a very sturdy wooden spoon to beat the ingredients together until well combined.
  3. Drop golf ball–size balls of dough, spaced evenly apart, onto the prepared baking sheet. Make a crisscross impression into the dough with a fork. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes or until cookies are still a bit soft in the center and just barely colored on the bottom. They firm up upon cooling. Do not overbake! Place pan on rack to cool.
  4. Store the cookies in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 4 days.

Tips

  • Chocolate Chip Peanut Butter Cookies: Stir in ½ cup (85 g) miniature or standard size semisweet chocolate morsels (using dairy-free if desired) into the batter after it is all mixed. Form, bake, and cool as directed.
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: American

Nutrition

Calories: 167kcal | Carbohydrates: 19g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 9g | Sodium: 22mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 17g

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.