Recipes | Salads: Main Dish & Sides

Low FODMAP Zoodles, Noodles & Sprouts Salad

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Are you a zoodles fan? In this recipe for Low FODMAP Zoodles, Noodles & Sprouts Salad, zucchini noodles (zoodles) are combined with chickpea pasta! Why not have zoodles AND noodles?

Chickpea pasta has been lab tested by Monash University and can be enjoyed in the quantities presented here. Mung bean sprouts, carrots and protein-packed tofu round out this salad that is hearty enough for a main dish. Packs well for lunch, too. Make sure to have our Low FODMAP Peanut Lime Sauce already prepared.

main image of Low FODMAP Zoodles, Noodles & Sprouts Salad in glass bowl
Low FODMAP Zoodles, Noodles & Sprouts Salad, with our Low FODMAP Peanut Lime Sauce in the background in a pitcher.

Is Chickpea Pasta Low FODMAP?

Monash University has lab tested chickpea pasta and servings of 1 cup (100 g), cooked, is considered Green light low FODMAP and appropriate for Elimination Phase.

Now, this sets up an issue for us. How much RAW pasta should be cooked to yield 100 g of cooked? We went into the Test Kitchen for you!

Low FODMAP Zoodles, Noodles & Sprouts Salad in clear glass bowl

Generally, the dry weight of the pasta roughly doubles in weight during cooking. The size of the pasta increases as well. The reason why we have to talk about generalities is because every single batch that you cook will vary to some degree. The final weight and size of your pasta is dependent on the amount of water that is absorbed during cooking. which will, in turn, vary depending on how much you cook your pasta and in theory, perhaps also dependent on the brand, how the pasta is made, what exact ingredients are contained therein, and perhaps even how dry the product is to begin with.

So, in general, to get to a low FODMAP serving size of 100 g cooked, start with 50 g raw. Weighing after cooking would give you the most exact results. Chickpea pasta, in larger quantities does contain GOS, so if you are sensitive, keep track of your serving sizes.

top view of Low FODMAP Zoodles, Noodles & Sprouts Salad in glass bowl; wooden servers alongside

Is Zucchini Low FODMAP?

Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested zucchini (also called marrow) for FODMAPs. FODMAP Friendly states that ½ cup or 75 is low FODMAP. We use the Monash results of ⅓ cup or 65 g as our touchstone. By the way, zucchini contains fructose, fructans and GOS, so take care until you know your personal tolerances.

Make Or Buy Zoodles

Zucchini noodles – zoodles – are easy to make if you have a spiralizer. Brands vary in their approach, but you can get them very inexpensively (often less than $10) or spend a bit more for machines that have more slicing options, such as this Spiralizer Ultimate, which I use.

Many supermarkets now also have zoodles pre-made. You will pay more but save time! Always nice to have choices.

Ingredients for Low FODMAP Zoodles, Noodles & Sprouts Salad

The ingredients should be easy to find. Check ahead to see if your market has the chickpea pasta. If not, it is easy to order online.

Ingredients for low FODMAP zoodles, noodles and sprouts salad

When it comes to tofu, remember to buy firm or extra-form tofu. We are partial to extra-firm. You can read more in our article about soy.

How To Make Low FODMAP Zoodles, Noodles & Sprouts Salad

Once your ingredients are prepped, including having made your Low FODMAP Peanut Lime Sauce, it is as simple as tossing everything together!

The carrots can be simply shredded using a box grater, or use this julienne peeler seen below for longer, more elegant shreds.

carrot being cut into julienne using a handy dandy julienne peeler. EASY! And inexpensive

Place the cooked chickpea pasta, zoodles, carrots, cilantro, scallions and bean sprouts in a large mixing bowl, as seen below.

Low FODMAP Zoodles, Noodles & Sprouts Salad ingredients in a mixing bowl

I like to use tongs to toss all the ingredients together. Then add just enough of the Low FODMAP Peanut Lime Sauce to coat.

Tossing Low FODMAP Zoodles, Noodles & Sprouts Salad ingredients in a mixing bowl

Make sure not to cheat the timing of draining and pressing the tofu. Removing excess water from your tofu will make all the difference in the resulting toothsome texture.

Toss in the tofu and peanuts and you are ready to serve!

Low FODMAP Zoodles, Noodles & Sprouts Salad with peanut lime sauce alongside

Using Untested Ingredients

Our article, What If A Food Hasn’t Been Lab Tested For FODMAPs? is a great read; highly recommended. I happen to love purple daikon radish and have learned through Challenges that I tolerate it well. Look at the color!

purple daikonWhite daikon radish has been lab tested by Monash and is low FODMAP in ½ cup (75 g) portions. If you do well with the tested white daikon, why not try this vibrant purple variant? I added some to the salad, as seen below, and it was a great additional texture, color and flavor. Know your own tolerances! After all, the ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible without triggering IBS symptoms.

low FODMAP Zoodles & Noodles with purple daikon radish added in glass bowl

main image of Low FODMAP Zoodles, Noodles & Sprouts Salad in glass bowl
5 from 2 votes

Low FODMAP Zoodles, Noodles & Sprouts Salad

In this recipe for Low FODMAP Zoodles, Noodles & Sprouts Salad, zucchini noodles (zoodles) are combined with chickpea pasta! Chickpea pasta has been lab tested by Monash University and can be enjoyed in the quantities presented here. Mung bean sprouts, carrots and protein-packed tofu round out this salad that is hearty enough for a main dish. Packs well for lunch, too.

Makes: 8 Servings
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

  • 14- ounces (400 g) extra-firm tofu, drained
  • 8- ounces (225 g) chickpea spaghetti, such as Banza brand, cooked al dente, drained
  • 7- ounces (200 g) zucchini noodles
  • 2 cups (200 g) mung bean sprouts
  • 2 carrots, trimmed and shredded
  • ½ cup (16 g) chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1 ¼ cups (300 ml) Low FODMAP Peanut Lime Sauce, or to taste

Preparation:

  1. Cut the tofu block in half lengthwise. Place a triple layer of paper towel on a cutting board, place tofu slabs on top, then cover them with another triple layer of towel. Put something heavy on top, like another cutting board with a heavy pot on top. Allow to sit for about 10 minutes. This technique will remove excess water from the tofu so that it will hold its shape in the salad. Once tofu has drained, discard paper towels and cut tofu into cubes and set aside.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, toss together the cooked spaghetti, zoodles, bean sprouts, shredded carrots and cilantro. Drizzle on about 1 cup (240 ml) Low FODMAP Peanut Lime Sauce. Toss in tofu and add more dressing, if needed. Salad is ready to eat or may be refrigerate in an airtight container for up to 3 days.

Tips

I also like this salad with shredded LOFO rotisserie or leftover chicken. Or even leftover salmon!

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

  • Carrots: Carrots have been lab tested and deemed low FODMAP by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly. According to Monash carrots contain no FODMAPs.
  • Scallions: The green parts of scallions are low FODMAP as determined by Monash University lab testing and can be used to add onion flavor to your low FODMAP cooking.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Course: Dinner & Lunch, Main Course
Cuisine: American and Asian

Nutrition

Calories: 366kcal | Carbohydrates: 31g | Protein: 16g | Fat: 22g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 21mg | Potassium: 345mg | Fiber: 4g | Sugar: 4g | Vitamin A: 62IU | Vitamin C: 12mg | Calcium: 34mg | Iron: 2mg

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.