Recipes | Sauces, Salsas & Condiments

Low FODMAP Roasted Strawberries

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Low FODMAP Roasted Strawberries are perfect stirred into yogurt, spooned over waffles, pancakes or Angel Food Cake – and you will think of other uses, no doubt. Strawberries are one of the first fruits of early summer – as we love making Roasted Strawberries! Fresh fruit is a thing of beauty and luckily, as FODMAPers, we still have plenty to choose from.

Sliced fresh strawberries tossed in sugar, ready to be roasted.

Are Strawberries Low FODMAP?

There is some confusion about strawberries, mostly due to the fact that Monash University had them listed on their smartphone app for many years as containing no FODMAPs, and then in updated tests, FODMAP content appeared.

There are scientific reasons for these differences, which are explained in this article: When Monash University and FODMAP Friendly Low FODMAP Lab Test Results Differ. All you need to know, in brief, is that the strawberries you buy will also be different from those that were lab tested, but you can use any of the lab test results (new or older Monash results; any FODMAP Friendly results) as the place to begin your exploration of your relationship of FODMAPs.

Please reference these articles for more complete explanations:

strawberries Ingredient

Strawberries are one of those Green Light fruits and the technique of roasting concentrates the gorgeous deep red color and sweet yet tangy flavor. Never roasted strawberries? You are in for a treat!

Roasted Strawberries For Maximum Flavor

The result is a bit sophisticated but Roasted Strawberries couldn’t be easier – strawberries and sugar go in a roasting pan and less than 30 minutes later you have a ruby red sauce ready to ladle onto pancakes, stir into yogurt or serve along a simple cake, such as our Simple Sponge Cake.

FODMAP Information

All recipes are based upon Monash University & FODMAP Friendly science at time of initial publication.

  • Strawberries: This popular berry has been lab tested by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly. Monash lab testing initially reported that no FODMAPs were detected in strawberries. They suggested 10 medium berries (150 g) as a serving. Subsequent lab tests in 2021 state 5 strawberries or 65 g as low FODMAP and the “no FODMAP” language has been removed; they show fructose content. FODMAP Friendly initially gave strawberries a “pass” and pegged 10 medium berries at (140 g) as a serving. They retested in 2021 and now state that their lab results show that a low FODMAP serving size is 50 g (or 4 berries). We suggest that you test your own tolerance (as always) and eat to your personal limit. Remember, the varieties, ripeness etc. of the berries that were lab tested will be different from those that you eat. Use the lab tests as a guide.
  • Sugar: Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested white, granulated sugar. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving size of white sugar is ¼ cup (50 g). FODMAP Friendly simply states that they have tested 1 tablespoon and that it is low FODMAP. Regular granulated white sugar is sucrose, which is a disaccharide made up of equal parts glucose and fructose. Sucrose is broken down and absorbed efficiently in the small intestine. As the fructose is never in excess of the glucose, white sugar will never be high FODMAP, even in large amounts.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. Foods will be retested from time to time; in the case of raw ingredients, such as fruits and vegetables, results may vary. All lab tested results are valid and represent a snapshot in time. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Roasted Strawberries

Let’s make roasted strawberries!

For another delicious fruit sauce/condiment, try our Caramelized Pineapple.

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Roasted Strawberries
5 from 3 votes

Roasted Strawberries

The high heat in the oven concentrates the added sugar and the sugar in the strawberries and yields a richly colored and flavored sauce to add to yogurt, spoon over pancakes or even lactose-free ice cream.

Low FODMAP Serving Size Info: Makes 3 ¾ cups (887 ml) sauce; serving size is a generous ½ cup (120 ml) of sauce

Makes: 8 Servings
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

Preparation:

  1. Position rack in hottest area of oven. Preheat oven to 425°F (220°C).

  2. Hull the berries and cut in half or quarters if very large. Note that you do want to retain some size as they shrink upon roasting; don’t slice them thinly! You want hunks of berries. Scatter the berries in a large roasting pan so that there is room around the berries. Sprinkle sugar over berries and toss to coat.
  3. Roast for 20 to 25 minutes total or until berries have exuded juice and the juice has thickened and somewhat caramelized. Shake the berries around in the pan once halfway through the time.
  4. Berries can be used warm, room temperature or chilled. Store up to 3 days in an airtight container.

Notes:

Tips

  • Try to sample before you buy so that you know you are getting sweet, juicy berries.

FODMAP Information

All recipes are based upon Monash University & FODMAP Friendly science at time of initial publication.

  • Strawberries: This popular berry has been lab tested by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly. Monash lab testing initially reported that no FODMAPs were detected in strawberries. They suggested 10 medium berries (150 g) as a serving. Subsequent lab tests in 2021 state 5 strawberries or 65 g as low FODMAP and the “no FODMAP” language has been removed; they show fructose content. FODMAP Friendly initially gave strawberries a “pass” and pegged 10 medium berries at (140 g) as a serving. They retested in 2021 and now state that their lab results show that a low FODMAP serving size is 50 g (or 4 berries). We suggest that you test your own tolerance (as always) and eat to your personal limit. Remember, the varieties, ripeness etc. of the berries that were lab tested will be different from those that you eat. Use the lab tests as a guide.
  • Sugar: Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested white, granulated sugar. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving size of white sugar is ¼ cup (50 g). FODMAP Friendly simply states that they have tested 1 tablespoon and that it is low FODMAP. Regular granulated white sugar is sucrose, which is a disaccharide made up of equal parts glucose and fructose. Sucrose is broken down and absorbed efficiently in the small intestine. As the fructose is never in excess of the glucose, white sugar will never be high FODMAP, even in large amounts.

 Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. Foods will be retested from time to time; in the case of raw ingredients, such as fruits and vegetables, results may vary. All lab tested results are valid and represent a snapshot in time. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Course: Condiment, Dessert, Sauce
Cuisine: American

Nutrition

Calories: 65kcal | Carbohydrates: 16g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 1g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 1mg | Potassium: 173mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 13g | Vitamin A: 15IU | Vitamin C: 66.7mg | Calcium: 18mg | Iron: 0.5mg

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.

Click here for 20 Low FODMAP Strawberry Recipes That Will Make You Berry Happy!