Recipes | Freezes Well

Low FODMAP Peanut Butter & Jelly Bars

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Our Low FODMAP Peanut Butter & Jelly Bars are gluten-free and lactose-free and bring you the classic combo of PB & J in an Elimination worthy treat. Did you know that Monash University has lab tested both strawberry and raspberry jam and there is a generous serving size of each? We put these fruity spreads to great use in this easy to make bar. And of course we bring you the info you need on peanut butter and FODMAPs.

overhead horizontal image of peanut butter and jelly bars on rack and silver trays
Your favorite PB&J flavors in an easy-to-make bar.

Use The Ingredients Called For

While this recipe uses many typical ingredients, like butter, brown sugar and eggs, when baking you must pay attention to details to get the results as presented.

For instance, our baking recipes always call for unsalted butter. You might think that subbing in salted butter is an easy swap and that you could just reduce the salt in the recipe, but believe it or not salted butter and unsalted butter can contain different amounts of water and moisture. Also, salt, being a preservative, means that salted butter has a longer shelf life and might be “older”. Since we often use butter for a fresh dairy flavor, this would be contrary to that goal.

overhead vertical image of peanut butter and jelly bars on rack and silver tray
No-Stir style peanut butter makes these bars moist and the best they can be.

If you like to bake a lot, check out our 275 page ebook, Low FODMAP Baking, for the ridiculously low price of $3.99. It has loads of info on substitutions and dozens of recipes not found on the website.

closeup of peanut butter and jelly bars on silver tray, cut into squares
Did you know that Monash University has lab tested and determined low FODMAP amounts of strawberry and raspberry jam?

Frequently Asked Questions

Is Peanut Butter Low FODMAP?

Yes it is. Further information is below in our FODMAP Information section. Both Monash and FODMAP Friendly have tested peanut butters and the amount used in our recommended serving size of these bars is low FODMAP.
 
For a deeper dive on the relationship between peanut butter and FODMAPs please read our article, Explore An Ingredient: Peanut Butter.
 
Not all Peanut Butter Is Created Equal
When I am creating a recipe that focuses on peanut butter I focus quite a bit on texture and ingredients, as well as flavor. Let me explain. While I can schmear any kind or brand of peanut butter on bread for a sandwich without much thought, when it comes to baking and cooking with peanut butter there is a lot more to think about.
 
For this recipe please use what is called for, which is smooth, no-stir style peanut butter (Skippy brand no-stir style recommended). If you substitute “natural” peanut butter the bars will be dry and crumbly. More is explained in the article linked above and here, Explore An Ingredient: Peanut Butter.

Can I Make This Recipe With Almond Butter?

Yes, you can! We did and loved it. Even though almond butter is low FODMAP in servings that are half that of peanut butter, the serving size of this recipe still creates a low FODMAP bar. Use a creamy almond butter such as Justin’s Classic.
 

Is Jam Low FODMAP?

Monash University has lab tested several jams but we will focus here on strawberry and raspberry as they are popular choices for this recipe. If you stick to our serving sizes you will be eating a low FODMAP amount of jam.
 
Here is some info for you:
 
Strawberry Jam made with no high fructose corn syrup: Low FODMAP at 2 Australian tablespoons or 40 g.
Strawberry Jam made with high fructose corn syrup: Low FODMAP at ½ Australian tablespoon or 10 g.
Raspberry Jam: Low FODMAP at 2 Australian tablespoons or 40 g. Moderate for FODMAPs at 45 g.
 
Notice that I didn’t say strawberry and raspberry are “the best” choices. That is because I happen to LOVE peanut butter with orange marmalade. Don’t knock it until you try it – and, Monash has lab tested marmalade and it is low FODMAP at 2 Australian tablespoons or 40 g. The image in the app looks like orange marmalade, but Monash has not confirmed.

peanut butter and jelly bar held in manicured woman's hand
Take a bit of our Low FODMAP Peanut Butter & jelly Bars! They are gluten-free, lactose-free and freeze well, too.

Nut Allergy: Buyer Beware

One day I was unpacking my groceries and there was a jar of Justin’s Peanut Butter. I had intended to buy the almond butter. I couldn’t imagine how I had made the mistake. The next time I went to the market I saw why.

Justin's almond butter and peanut butter jars on supermarket shelf
We think these labels are too similar. Most people think about a peanut “shape” to be the hourglass shape of a peanut in the shell. Here, on the right, is a graphic of a shelled peanut, which looks very much like the almond on the left. If you have an allergy to one or the other nut, this is a big issue.

In my opinion these labels are far too similar. The peanut does look like a shelled peanut, but people think about a peanut “shape” as what it looks like in the shell, plus this shelled peanut looks like their almond!

We wanted to point this out because we know that some of you can tolerate peanuts and not almonds, and also for many of you it is the opposite. As always, read labels! (Better than I did, anyway!)

peanut butter and jelly bars unmolded from pan on cutting board
Here you can see a closeup of the strawberry jam sandwiched in the middle.

How To Make Low FODMAP Peanut Butter & Jelly Bars

Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C). Coat a 9 by 13-inch (23 cm by 33 cm) cake pan with nonstick spray, then line with parchment paper overhanging two sides. Coat the parchment paper with nonstick spray and dust lightly with extra flour.

Whisk together the 2 ¾ cups (399 g) flour, salt and baking powder in a small bowl to aerate and combine.

butter, sugar and brown sugar in bowl
One of the things I love about this recipe is that you can cream the butter and sugars together all at once, which saves time.

Beat in vanilla, then eggs and peanut butter and continue beating until mixture is well blended and smooth.

batter in mixer bowl for peanut butter bars
Beat until creamy after adding the peanut butter.

Beat in flour mixture on low speed, just until combined.

finished batter for peanut butter bars in bowl with spatula
The batter will look like this after the flour is added.

Spread about two-thirds of the dough into the prepared cake pan, creating an even layer (I use a small offset spatula and assess the amount by eye).

spreading peanut butter bar batter in pan

Spread the jam evenly over the dough.

strawberry jam spread over peanut butter batter in pan

Drop small bits of the remaining dough evenly over the jam; it is okay if the jam peeks through here and there, but try to make it as evenly covered as possible.

making peanut butter bars- showing dollops of batter on top of jam

Sprinkle with chopped peanuts, if using.

peanuts sprinkled on top of peanut butter and jelly bar batter in pan

Bake for about 40 to 45 minutes or until golden brown. A toothpick inserted in the center will come out with a few crumbs clinging .

peanut butter and jelly bars baked in pan, just out of oven

Cool on a rack completely before cutting into 40 bars (an 8 by 5 grid).

overhead image of peanut butter and jelly bars being cut

Your Low FODMAP PB&J Bars are ready to serve or store in single layers, separated by parchment, at room temperature in an airtight container for up to 4 days. They can also be frozen for up to a month. Double wrap in plastic wrap, then slip into a zip top bag.

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

  • Butter: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested butter. Monash states that a low FODMAP Green Light portion is 1 tablespoon or 19 g and also states that “butter is high in fat and does not contain carbohydrates (FODMAPs)”. FODMAP Friendly gives it a “Pass” at 1 tablespoon or 19 g. Both recommended serving sizes are presented as part of healthy eating guidelines, not as maximum FODMAP serving size. Fat can affect guy motility and trigger IBS symptoms in some people. Eat to your tolerance.
  • Dairy: The low FODMAP diet is not a dairy-free diet. It is however, low in lactose. Many dairy ingredients are low in lactose, such as heavy cream and many cheeses.
  • Eggs: Eggs are high in protein and do not contain carbohydrates, according to Monash University.
  • Peanut Butter: Monash and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested peanut butter. We do not have further information as to what kind of peanut butter was tested (unsweetened natural, made with hydrogenated oil and sugar, or no-stir style with palm oil and sugar). Monash shows two entries. We do not know what the images correspond to in terms of type of peanut butter. They state that both are low FODMAP at 2 Australian tablespoons, although one is said to be 50 g and the other 32 g. FODMAP Friendly’s app image shows what looks to be some sort of creamy style (not natural). They give it a “Pass” at 2 tablespoons (50 g). It is also important to note that Monash has said peanuts themselves have only trace amounts of FODMAPs and they say that peanut butter only becomes Moderate for fructose at 140 g. If you malabsorb fructose, it might be an issue; for others it might be tolerated very well.
  • Raspberry Jam: Monash University has lab tested raspberry jam and it is low FODMAP at 2 Australian tablespoons or 40 g. Moderate for FODMAPs at 45 g.
  • Strawberry Jam: Monash University has lab tested two kinds of strawberry jam. Strawberry Jam made with no high fructose corn syrup is low FODMAP at 2 Australian tablespoons or 40 g. Strawberry Jam made with high fructose corn syrup is low FODMAP at ½ Australian tablespoon or 10 g.
  • Sugar: Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested white, granulated sugar. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving size of white sugar is ¼ cup (50 g). FODMAP Friendly simply states that they have tested 1 tablespoon and that it is low FODMAP. Regular granulated white sugar is sucrose, which is a disaccharide made up of equal parts glucose and fructose. Sucrose is broken down and absorbed efficiently in the small intestine. 

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

overhead horizontal image of peanut butter and jelly bars on rack and silver trays
4.5 from 4 votes

Low FODMAP Peanut Butter and Jelly Bars

Our Low FODMAP Peanut Butter & Jelly Bars are gluten-free and lactose-free and bring you the classic combo of PB & J in an Elimination worthy treat. Did you know that Monash University has lab tested both strawberry and raspberry jam and there is a generous serving size of each? We put these fruity spreads to great use in this easy to make bar. And of course we bring you the info you need on peanut butter and FODMAPs.

Low FODMAP Serving Size Info: Makes 40 bars; 1 bar per serving

Makes: 40 Servings
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 45 minutes
Total Time: 55 minutes
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

  • 2 ¾ cups (399 g) low FODMAP gluten-free all-purpose flour, such as Bob’s Red Mill 1 to 1 Baking Flour, plus extra for pan
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder; use gluten-free if following a gluten-free diet
  • 1/2 pound (226 g; 2 sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature, cut into pieces
  • 1 cup (198 g) sugar
  • ½ cup (107 g) firmly packed light brown sugar
  • 1 ¼ teaspoons pure vanilla extract
  • 3 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 2 cups (512 g) smooth no-stir style peanut butter (Skippy brand no-stir style recommended)
  • 1 1/2 cups (480 g) strawberry or raspberry jam, sweetened with sugar, not high fructose syrup; I like Smucker's Natural
  • 1/2 cup (73 g) salted peanuts, coarsely chopped; optional

Preparation:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C). Coat a 9 by 13-inch (23 cm by 33 cm) cake pan with nonstick spray, then line with parchment paper overhanging two sides. Coat the parchment paper with nonstick spray and dust lightly with extra flour.
  2. Whisk together the 2 ¾ cups (399 g) flour, salt and baking powder in a small bowl to aerate and combine.
  3. Cream the butter, sugar and brown sugar on medium speed with electric mixer until very light and creamy about 2 to 3 minutes. Beat in vanilla, then eggs and peanut butter and continue beating until mixture is well blended and smooth.
  4. Beat in flour mixture on low speed, just until combined. Spread about two-thirds of the dough into the prepared cake pan, creating an even layer (I use a small offset spatula). Spread the jam evenly over the dough. Drop small bits of the remaining dough evenly over the jam; it is okay if the jam peeks through here and there, but try to make it as evenly covered as possible. Sprinkle with chopped peanuts, if using.
  5. Bake for about 40 to 45 minutes or until golden brown. A toothpick inserted in the center will come out with a few crumbs clinging . Cool on a rack completely before cutting into 40 bars (an 8 by 5 grid). Your Low FODMAP PB&J Bars are ready to serve or store in single layers, separated by parchment, at room temperature in an airtight container for up to 4 days. They can also be frozen for up to a month. Double wrap in plastic wrap, then slip into a zip top bag.

Dédé’s Quick Recipe Tips Video

Notes:

• You can make Low FODMAP Almond Butter & Jelly Bars. Even though almond butter is low FODMAP in servings that are half that of peanut butter, the serving size of this recipe still creates a low FODMAP bar. Use a creamy almond butter such as Justin’s Classic.

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

Butter: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested butter. Monash states that a low FODMAP Green Light portion is 1 tablespoon or 19 g and also states that “butter is high in fat and does not contain carbohydrates (FODMAPs)”. FODMAP Friendly gives it a “Pass” at 1 tablespoon or 19 g. Both recommended serving sizes are presented as part of healthy eating guidelines, not as maximum FODMAP serving size. Fat can affect guy motility and trigger IBS symptoms in some people. Eat to your tolerance.
Dairy: The low FODMAP diet is not a dairy-free diet. It is however, low in lactose. Many dairy ingredients are low in lactose, such as heavy cream and many cheeses.
Eggs: Eggs are high in protein and do not contain carbohydrates, according to Monash University.
Peanut Butter: Monash and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested peanut butter. We do not have further information as to what kind of peanut butter was tested (unsweetened natural, made with hydrogenated oil and sugar, or no-stir style with palm oil and sugar). Monash shows two entries. We do not know what the images correspond to in terms of type of peanut butter. They state that both are low FODMAP at 2 Australian tablespoons, although one is said to be 50 g and the other 32 g. FODMAP Friendly’s app image shows what looks to be some sort of creamy style (not natural). They give it a “Pass” at 2 tablespoons (50 g). It is also important to note that Monash has said peanuts themselves have only trace amounts of FODMAPs and they say that peanut butter only becomes Moderate for fructose at 140 g. If you malabsorb fructose, it might be an issue; for others it might be tolerated very well.
Raspberry Jam: Monash University has lab tested raspberry jam and it is low FODMAP at 2 Australian tablespoons or 40 g. Moderate for FODMAPs at 45 g.
Strawberry Jam: Monash University has lab tested two kinds of strawberry jam. Strawberry Jam made with no high fructose corn syrup is low FODMAP at 2 Australian tablespoons or 40 g. Strawberry Jam made with high fructose corn syrup is low FODMAP at ½ Australian tablespoon or 10 g.
Sugar: Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested white, granulated sugar. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving size of white sugar is ¼ cup (50 g). FODMAP Friendly simply states that they have tested 1 tablespoon and that it is low FODMAP. Regular granulated white sugar is sucrose, which is a disaccharide made up of equal parts glucose and fructose. Sucrose is broken down and absorbed efficiently in the small intestine.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Course: Dessert, Snack, Treat
Cuisine: American

Nutrition

Calories: 225kcal | Carbohydrates: 26g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 12g | Sodium: 130mg | Potassium: 1mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 15g | Calcium: 1mg | Iron: 1mg

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.