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No FODMAP Chicken Paillard

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This recipe for No FODMAP Chicken Paillard is part of our series of recipes that contain NO FODMAPs! The low FODMAP diet is not about removing FODMAPs completely, rather it is about lowering your intake, however, we know that some folks are ultra-sensitive and maybe at a point where their digestion seems to get triggered by the smallest FODMAP intake. A no FODMAP meal might be just what you are looking for.

No FODMAP Chicken Paillard on white plate, against dark background

Chicken Paillard For Everyone

A chicken paillard is simply a boneless, skinless chicken breast that has been pounded thin. Chicken paillard is a classic preparation that can provide a quick, tasty meal for everyone, whether they are following the low FODMAP diet or not.

What Does Paillard Mean?

Paillard is a French term for a boneless piece of poultry or meat that has been pounded thin. Sometimes the meat has been butterflied before pounding with a mallet. Traditionally the term is used in reference to chicken or veal.

No FODMAP Chicken Paillard on white plate

What Is The Advantage Of Making a Paillard?

Pounding the poultry or meat thinly tenderizes the meat and also creates a thinner cut that cooks faster leading to less moisture loss. You might think that a thin piece of skinless, boneless chicken would dry out, but it cooks so quickly that it actually does not (of course you have to take care not to over-cook).

No FODMAP vs. Low FODMAP

If you follow this recipe strictly, using just the chicken, olive oil and a small amount of salt and pepper, it will be a no FODMAP dish. (Note that salt has not been lab tested and that pepper is low FODMAP in very generous 1 teaspoon portions. The amount used to season food in this manner is considered negligible).

Please read our article, What Is A Low FODMAP Serving Size? for more information as well as our article, What If A Food Has Not Been Lab Tested For FODMAPs?

For a fancy very low FODMAP variation, toss some very low FODMAP arugula with No FODMAP Malt Vinegar Vinaigrette and serve a mound on top of your chicken paillard. How about a plain No FODMAP baked potato alongside?

Note on Arugula: For years Monash had reported that arugula contained NO FODMAPs in lab testing. During a recent smartphone app update, the statement changed to “only trace amounts”. They still recommend to “eat freely and according to appetite”. Always eat to your tolerances.

No FODMAP Chicken Paillard on white plate topped with no FODMAP arugula salad

Here are some variations that will create a low FODMAP chicken paillard:
  • Add a pat of butter and some lemon juice and/or white wine to the pan while your chicken rests. Swirl it around until it thickens and pour over paillard before serving.
  • Brown some butter in the pan and pour over rested chicken breast.
  • Deglaze the pan with white, scrape up any browned bits, add a shower of fresh herbs and serve with chicken.
  • How about some browned butter and capers?

Ingredients for No FODMAP Chicken Paillard

4 ingredients! Check it out!

No FODMAP Chicken Paillard

Chicken – I look for moderately sized chicken breast halves that weigh about 6 to 8-ounces (170 g to 225 g).

Olive OilUse an extra virgin olive oil with a flavor that you love. You could use vegetable oil as well, but we like the flavor of olive oil in this recipe.

Kosher Salt – We prefer Diamond Kosher Salt and use it in our Test Kitchen.

Freshly Ground Black PepperPlease do not use pre-ground. When you have a recipe with so few ingredients, you need all the flavor you can get.

How To Make No FODMAP Chicken Paillard

The key to making our No FODMAP Chicken Paillard is all in pounding the chicken to a proper thinness, and then the cooking technique.

Here is what your half breast looks like out of the package.

half a chicken breast about to be turned into a paillard

Flip the breast over so that its underside is facing up and locate the “tender”. This is the small, tender flap (seen below), which you want to remove. Reserve it for stir fry or some other use. You will be able to create a more even thickness when you pound the paillard if it is removed.

locating the tender on a chicken breast
Locating the tender on a chicken breast.

The next step is to split the breast in half horizontally.

splitting chicken breast horizontally

Secure the chicken breast half between plastic wrap. Use a mallet with a flat side; do not use the textured side, which will tear the meat.

Here is a great mallet, if you need one.

You can also use a wine bottle or rolling pin, if necessary.

pounding a chicken paillard between plastic wrap

The technique is important. Do not pound straight down, like pounding a nail. Pound gently and repeatedly and work the mallet away from you, almost like you are stroking the surface. Keep moving your mallet around the meat to keep bringing it down in thickness evenly, taking care not to tear the meat.

As far as cooking is concerned, you need a heavy skillet with excellent heat conductivity for best results. I use my triple-ply aluminum, such as All-Clad. If it is large enough, you can cook two paillards at a time.

Coat the pan very lightly with oil and place the paillard in the pan, laying it down away from you to minimize splatter.

pan lightly coated with oil, chicken paillard cooking on first side

Let the first side develop a nice crust before flipping over to cook the second side.

let the paillard develop a nice crust

That’s it! Super simple – and NO FODMAP!

No FODMAP Chicken Paillard on white plate topped with no FODMAP arugula salad-2

Make sure to visit our other No FODMAP recipes to help you build your meals throughout the days and weeks:

No FODMAP Chicken Paillard on white plate, against dark background
5 from 1 vote

No FODMAP Chicken Paillard

This recipe for No FODMAP Chicken Paillard is part of our series of recipes that contain NO FODMAPs! The low FODMAP diet is not about removing FODMAPs completely, rather it is about lowering your intake, however, we know that some folks are ultra-sensitive and maybe at a point where their digestion seems to get triggered by the smallest FODMAP intake. A no FODMAP meal might be just what you are looking for.

Makes: 4 Servings
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

  • 2 skinless boneless chicken breast halves, about 6 to 8-ounces (170 g to 225 g) each, at room temperature
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Extra-virgin olive oil

Preparation:

  1. Remove the tender from each of chicken breast halves and reserve for another use. Place a breast half on your work surface between two pieces of plastic wrap. Use a flat-sided mallet to pound the paillard into an even thickness of about ¼-inch (6 mm). Don’t whack the mallet straight down; instead use a gentle repeated tapping motion, working the mallet away from you (not vertically down) and keep working the mallet all around the chicken until it is an even thickness. Season both sides with salt and pepper and repeat with other breast half.
  2. Heat a heavy skillet over medium heat and add enough oil just to coat the bottom of the pan. If your skillet is large enough you can cook both paillards at once, otherwise cook one at a time, but don’t worry – they cook very quickly! Place the chicken in the pan, laying it down away from you to minimize splatter. Allow to sear, shaking the pan a bit from time to time. Once you get a nice crust on the bottom, flip over and cook the second side. It should be 5 minutes max and maybe less. This will depend on the size of the breasts and their temperature. Serve immediately.

Tips

  • Take your time with the pounding technique, taking care not to tear the chicken flesh and to create an even thickness.
Course: Dinner, lunch, Main Course
Cuisine: American

Nutrition

Calories: 150kcal | Protein: 20g | Fat: 8g

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.