Recipes | Baking

No FODMAP Leafy Green Salad

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This No FODMAP Leafy Green Salad can be your go-to green salad with dinner or lunch. We hear people saying all the time that they think that they cannot eat vegetables on the low FODMAP diet; nothing could be further from the truth. This salad features no FODMAP leafy endive (frisée), red leaf and butter lettuce. Serve with our No FODMAP Malt Vinegar Salad Dressing.

No FODMAP Leafy Green Salad in wooden bowlA Note On Arugula

For years Monash had reported that arugula contained NO FODMAPs in lab testing. During a recent smartphone app update, the statement changed to “only trace amounts”, however, they still recommend to “eat freely and according to appetite”.

We think a little arugula is a great addition to the other no FODMAP greens. As always, eat to your own tolerances.

Ingredients For No FODMAP Leafy Green Salad

You are probably familiar with red leaf lettuce and butter lettuce – and if not, you can see them below. Any confusion, if there is any, might reside with the leafy endive. Many of us think of Belgian endive when we hear “endive”.

Ingredients for No FODMAP Leafy Green Salad

On the Monash app, Belgian endive is called “witlof”, which has a generous low FODMAP serving size, but it is not “no” FODMAP. Very curiously, the small print under witlof on the app says, “There is no upper limit for this vegetable”.

And, by the way, leafy endive is another name for frisée, and is also sometimes called curly endive. Frankly I have never seen “leafy endive” terminology anywhere but the Monash app.

How Do You Pronounce “Endive”

Well, it all depends on how you learned how to pronounce it and where you live. There are two ways to pronounce endive:

  1. En-daiv, which is not very helpful, is it? That’s they way the dictionaries spell it. I think it is more helpful so see the phonetic “N-Dive”.
  2. The second way is “On-Deev”.

Make sure to visit our other No FODMAP recipes to help you build your meals throughout the days and weeks:

vertical of No FODMAP Leafy Green Salad closeup in wooden bowl

No FODMAP Leafy Green Salad in wooden bowl
5 from 2 votes

No FODMAP Leafy Green Salad

This No FODMAP Leafy Green Salad can be your go-to green salad with dinner or lunch. We hear people saying all the time that they think that they cannot eat vegetables on the low FODMAP diet; nothing could be further from the truth. This salad features no FODMAP leafy endive (frisée), red leaf and butter lettuce. Serve with our No FODMAP Malt Vinegar Salad Dressing. 

Makes: 4 Servings
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 5 minutes
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups (75 g) butter lettuce, leaves washed and dried
  • 2 cups (75 g) leafy endive, leaves washed and dried
  • 2 cups (75 g) red leaf lettuce, leaves washed and dried

Preparation:

  1. Simply tear the leaves into bite sized pieces right into a large mixing bowl. Dress with olive oil, salt and pepper, or use our No FODMAP Malt Vinegar Salad Dressing.

Tips

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

  • Lettuce: Butter lettuce has been lab tested by Monash and has no FODMAP content.
  • Lettuce: Red Leaf lettuce, also called red coral on the Monash app, has been lab tested and has no FODMAP content.
  • Endive, leafy: Monash has lab tested leafy endive and it contains no FODMAPs.

    Note that in the store it will most likely be labeled as curly endive or frisée.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Course: Salad, Side Dish
Cuisine: American

Nutrition

Calories: 8kcal | Carbohydrates: 1g | Protein: 1g

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.