Recipes | Cookies, Brownies & Bars

Low FODMAP Anise Almond Biscotti

DFGFVEGEZ

Low FODMAP Anise Almond Biscotti for FODMAPers

Let me tell you about this recipe for Low FODMAP Anise Almond Biscotti. I developed it quite a while ago. The photos were shot months and months ago. And yet, I never got these Low FODMAP Almond Biscotti up on the site. Why? Basically I am constantly inundated with so many recipe needs and I am just one person 😉.

low FODMAP anise almond biscotti on a silver plate

I LOVE baking and I really love creating low FODMAP recipes for all you FODMAPers, both sweet and savory. On any given day I probably have half a dozen recipes or more, clamoring for my attention.

Are You A Biscotti Lover? Rhonda Is!

And there are many recipes, like this Low FODMAP Anise Almond Biscotti recipe, that have been developed and are just waiting to see the light of day. I intended on getting them up on the site in time for fall baking…but then along came Rhonda.

She is a FODMAP Everyday® fan that we “met” on Facebook. She has been asking for the biscotti recipe. And asking. And asking again. Always politely, and I have to say she has been consistent in her focus LOL. Well, she wore me down! I decided that this woman obviously REALLY needed her biscotti, and I hope this recipe brings her joy.

low FODMAP anise almond biscotti on a silver plate

Learn to Thrive on the Low FODMAP Diet

From the beginning, our dictum here at FODMAP Everyday®has been that we want to help all of you learn how to thrive on the low FODMAP diet. Thriving on a diet means different things to different people. For some it might mean still being able to have their cup of coffee in the morning. For others it means being able to make one meal for the whole family. For Rhonda it means having her biscotti! Well, here it is, for her and all of you.

low FODMAP anise almond biscotti on a silver plate

Biscotti = Twice Baked

Biscotti are a crisp cookie that are baked once in a log shape, then baked again after the log is cut into long, thin “slices” that give biscotti their distinct shape, as seen below.

low FODMAP anise almond biscotti in progress

Anise – Maybe Give It A Try

Anise seed has not been tested by Monash as of the writing of this recipe, but they are used in a very small amount and we have made them optional; we recommend you try these biscotti when your system is nice and calm and see how you do with the anise included.

Anise is part of the Apiaceae family, as are dill, coriander, cumin, parsley and carrots and those have been tested by Monash as low FODMAP.

They do add a very nice licorice flavor, which is common in many classic Italian biscotti recipes.

Dry & Crunchy & Quick to Prep

These are very dry and crunchy and have no added fat other than from the egg yolk. For a richer, more sumptuous biscotti-style cookie try our Super Easy Low FODMAP Mandebrot, which contain butter.

You can get these Low FODMAP Anise Almond Biscotti ready for the oven in the time it takes for it to preheat, but then there is a cooling down period after the initial baking before you slice them. Do not rush this cooling step, as they will crumble if you try to cut them while warm, but as you can see in the image below they slice beautifully if you follow the directions.

For more cookies, check out our One-Bowl Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies, Our Breakfast Cookies, a S’More Chocolate Chunk Cookie, Vegan Peanut Butter Cookies and so many more! We even have a gigantic Happy Birthday Cookie!

low FODMAP anise almond biscotti on a silver plate
5 from 2 votes

Low FODMAP Anise Almond Biscotti

These dry and crispy biscotti have the classic addition of almonds and optional anise seed. Dunk in your favorite hot beverage!

Low FODMAP Serving Size Info: Makes about 20 long, elegant biscotti; serving size 1 biscotti

Makes: 20 biscotti
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 50 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour

Ingredients:

  • 1 2/3 cups (241 g) all purpose gluten-free flour such as Bob’s Red Mill 1 to 1 Gluten-Free All-Purpose Baking Blend
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder; use gluten-free if following a gluten-free diet
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2/3 cups (131 g) sugar, plus extra
  • 3 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon almond extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon anise seed, optional
  • 1 1/3 cups (115 g) sliced natural or blanched almonds, lightly toasted

Preparation:

  1. Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 350°F/180°C. Line a baking sheet pan with parchment and lightly coat parchment with nonstick spray.
  2. Whisk together the flour, baking powder and salt in a small bowl until aerated and combined; set aside.
  3. In another larger bowl whisk together the 2/3 cup (131 g) sugar and the eggs until very well blended and somewhat creamy. (You can also do this with an electric mixer). Beat in the vanilla, almond extract, and anise seed if using. Fold in the dry mixture until just a few floury streaks remain, then fold in the almonds.
  4. Scrape out half of the batter onto the pan. Dampen hands and use them to form the batter into a fat log about 12-inches long and 2-inches (30.5 cm by 5 cm) wide. Repeat with remaining dough and then place the logs equally spaced apart on the pan. Sprinkle with the extra sugar, about a tablespoon or so, if desired.
  5. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes or until logs are a very pale golden color. The tops might crack a bit; that’s okay. Reduce the oven temperature to 300°F/150°C. Now comes the waiting. Place pan on rack to cool for 15 minutes or until logs are barely warm to the touch. Carefully transfer logs to cutting board and use a very sharp chef’s knife to cut 1/2-inch (12 mm) biscotti on a steep diagonal. Place individual biscotti back on pan, cut side down, evenly spaced apart and bake for 10 to 12 minutes or just until they begin to take on some more color. Flip them each over carefully and bake for another 10 to 12 minutes. Cool pan on rack completely before storing. Store biscotti in an airtight container at room temperature for up to a week.

Tips

  • You can also use an equivalent amount of whole almonds, natural or blanched, lightly toasted and roughly chopped. You will get a more classic “look” with the big pieces of nuts, but I find that they make it more difficult to sliced neatly. Your choice!