Recipes | One-Dish Recipes

Low FODMAP One-Pot Greek Salmon with Feta & Peppers

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In an effort to provide you with one-pot dinners we bring you our Low FODMAP One-Pot Greek Salmon with Feta & Peppers – AND it can be made in less than 30 minutes, which means it qualifies as Quick & Easy as well.

Greek salmon on decorative light white plate on white quartz

It also happens to be fairly lean and the healthy omega-3 fats in the salmon are a welcomed addition to your diet.

Greek Inspired: Feta, Olives & Dill

This recipe for Low FODMAP One-Pot Greek Salmon with Feta & Peppers came about after I had already made our Low FODMAP One-Pot Salmon with Snap Peas.

I was so enamored of the technique and process that I wanted to make other salmon dishes using the same approach – hence this recipe.

We always keep feta around. Many cheeses are low FODMAP! You can read more in our article Is Cheese Low FODMAP? We teach you how to tell if ANY cheese is low FODMAP, just by reading the ingredient label. (Speaking of which, you might also read our article titled How To Read A FDA Nutritional Facts Panel.

 For this recipe look for a firmer feta that you can cut into cubes. Feta can vary hugely in texture from firm to crumbly to creamy. Get to know the flavor and textures of the brands and types available to you.

Olives, both black and green, have been lab tested by Monash University and have low FODMAP servings of 60 g.

And you will be happy to learn that many fresh herbs, from dill to parsley, cilantro to rosemary and many more have all been lab tested as low FODMAP and we encourage their use in your kitchen to help you make the best ever low FODMAP recipes.

Greek salmon on decorative light blub plate on white quartz with lemon wedge

One-Pot For Easy Weeknight Cooking

You need a wide skillet (I use a 12-inch/30.5 cm skillet) for this recipe that also has a cover. The rice is partially cooked first, then salmon is placed right on top of the rice and gets its cooking time, steaming away under the lid. The feta, kalamata olives and red bell pepper are added a few minutes later.

Red bell pepper actually has NO FODMAPs, so it is a colorful, crunchy and tasty choice. Learn which foods have no FODMAPs so that you can use them liberally in your cooking, such as carrots, parsnips and potatoes, to name a few others.

overhead of Greek salmon on decorative light blub plate on white quartz

Flavor Balance For Low FODMAP One-Pot Greek Salmon

The suggested lemon wedges or vinaigrette might seem like an extra, but they are integral. The acidity that they bring – you choose one or the other – provides the necessary balance. The fish is fatty and lush. The rice is mild, the olives are salty. A spritz of acid brings it all together.

Add your squeeze of fresh lemon or a drizzle of low FODMAP vinaigrette right before serving for that desirable zippy flavor. Use purchased vinaigrette if you like or make one of ours, like our Red Wine Vinaigrette.

More One-Dish Recipes

Greek salmon on decorative light white plate on white quartz
5 from 1 vote

Low FODMAP One-Pot Greek Salmon with Feta & Peppers

In an effort to provide you with one-pot dinners we bring you our Low FODMAP One-Pot Greek Salmon with Feta & Peppers - AND it can be made in less than 30 minutes, which means it qualifies as Quick & Easy as well.

Makes: 4 Servings
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

  • 2 1/3 cups (555 ml) water
  • 1 cup (195 g) jasmine rice
  • 1- pound (455 g) salmon filet, skinned, cut crosswise into 4 filets
  • 1 red bell pepper, cored, cut into strips
  • ½ green bell pepper, cored, cut into strips
  • 3- ounces (85 g) firm feta, cut into small cubes
  • ¼ cup (40 g) pitted Kalamata olives, halved crosswise
  • ¼ cup (8 g) chopped fresh dill
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Lemon wedges or Low FODMAP Vinaigrette

Preparation:

  1. Stir together the water and rice in a 12-inch (30.5 cm) skillet, cover and bring to a boil Adjust heat down to a very low simmer and cook for 10 minutes. After 10 minutes place the salmon on top of the rice, cover and cook, still on low heat, for 8 minutes. Now scatter the pepper strips, feta, olives, and dill around the fish, season with salt and pepper, cover and continue to cook on low heat for 5 minutes more or until fish is just cooked through.
  2. Add a squirt of lemon or drizzle a bit of vinaigrette over the salmon and vegetables when they are done and serve immediately.

Tips

  • Dried dill can be used in this dish, although fresh bumps it up to another level. If using dry, start with a tablespoon and adjust to taste.

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

  • Cheese: Many cheeses have low FODMAP serving sizes. The low FODMAP diet is not a dairy-free diet. Hard cheeses such as Parmigiano Reggiano or Pecorino Romano have been lab tested by Monash University and are low FODMAP in 40 g amounts.
  • Green Bell Peppers: Green bell peppers have been lab tested by Monash University and are recommended in low FODMAP amounts of ½ cup or 52 g. FODMAP Friendly has lab tested green bell peppers and states that 1 small pepper at 75 g is low FODMAP.
  • Red Bell Peppers: Red bell peppers have been lab tested by Monash University and have shown no detectable FODMAPs. FODMAP Friendly has lab tested red bell peppers and states that 1 small pepper at 75 g is low FODMAP.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Course: Dinner, Main Course
Cuisine: American, Greek

Nutrition

Calories: 522kcal | Carbohydrates: 51g | Protein: 31g | Fat: 21g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 10mg | Potassium: 68mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 1g | Calcium: 21mg | Iron: 1mg

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.