Recipes | Side Dishes

Low FODMAP Root Vegetable Tian

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Our Low FODMAP Root Vegetable Tian combines no-FODMAP potatoes and parsnips with low FODMAP amounts of beets and sweet potatoes. Sliced thinly, arranged in a baking dish, drizzled with extra-virgin oil, sprinkled with salt, pepper, dried thyme and a little Parmesan, this spectacular side-dish will enhance your weekday roast chicken – or make for a holiday meal or festive get-together.

baked-root-vegetable-tian-in-glass-dish-on-white-painted-surface

About Our Low FODMAP Root Vegetable Tian

What Is A Tian?

A tian, like a terrine, can refer to an actual vessel or the dish cooked inside the vessel. A tian is usually earthenware or ceramic and is oven safe and are very often round or oval in shape. The tian that is assembled inside the dish is a layered affair – typically made up of vegetables. The chosen ingredients are sliced thinly and often arranged in a colorful and aesthetically pleasing fashion, such as overlapping rows.

What Dish Did You Use To Make This Low FODMAP Root Vegetable Tian?

That pretty pink dish you see in the images is my gorgeous embossed Anchor Hocking Pie Plate that I chose to enhance these vibrant vegetable colors.

How Do You Slice The Vegetables So Evenly?

By using a mandoline…
 
This dish is as much about look as it is about flavor and color. The flavor and color are taken care of with the choice of vegetables and seasoning. The looks is all about the evenly sliced potatoes, sweet potatoes, parsnips and beets.
 
You could slice all of these vegetables by hand, or perhaps with a thin slicing blade in your food processor, but nothing will give you the most consistent results as a mandoline.

What Is A Mandoline?

A mandoline is a manual slicing machine. It consists of a flat surface with a razor-sharp blade that can be adjusted to cut slices of varying thickness or thinness.

More elaborate models have supplementary blades for making julienne cuts, thin shreds, wavy ridged cuts and even waffle cuts. All of the blades are very sharp and extreme care should be used when handling. Some mandolines come with a guard to shield your fingers and hands from being cut.

How Much Does A Mandoline Cost?

Mandolines can vary from very inexpensive plastic versions, to museum worthy stainless models.
 
An economical model from Kasen gets the job done and includes additional blades and a hand guard; a great tool for the price. 

The Benriner mandoline has near cult status as being inexpensive, reliable and basic.

The French de Buyer mandoline has its own devotees. Stainless steel construction with super-grippy feet so that is sticks to your work surface; this makes it safer to use. Any shape you want to create is possible with this elegant tool, which will last a lifetime. The extra blades can be stored in a handy little compartment, so they won’t get lost. The machine is a joy to use. FOOD 52

When Should I Use a Mandoline?

Anytime you want uniform slices, such as when making a potato or vegetable gratin or homemade potato chips. Some models can aid in making French fries and “shredding” vegetables like cabbage or Brussels sprouts for slaws.
 
When you need a large quantity of fruit or vegetables cut quickly and evenly, use your mandoline.

Can You Explain The FODMAPs In This Recipe?

This recipe combines several root vegetables; some that contain no FODMAPs, and some that have been used in low FODMAP amounts per serving. Let’s look at them one at a time.

Are Potatoes Low FODMAP?

Not only are the Yukon Gold type potatoes used in this recipe low FODMAP, they actually contain no FODMAPs according to Monash University lab testing. Read more about this beloved root vegetable in our article Explore An Ingredient: Potatoes.

Can I Use Any Kind Of Potato?

While gold potatoes, such as Yukon gold, in addition to yellow, white, red and purple potatoes, as well as russet baking potatoes all contain no FODMAPs, I think the Yukon gold type provide the best color, flavor and texture. You could try any of the others except the baking potatoes; their starchy texture will detract from the look and texture of this dish.

Are Parsnips Low FODMAP?

Parsnips contain no FODMAPs according to Monash University lab testing. See our article on No FODMAP Foods.

Are Beets Low FODMAP?

Beets, or beetroot to be proper, have a small low FODMAP amount of 20 g according to Monash University lab testing.

Are Sweet Potatoes Low FODMAP?

Sweet potatoes have a low FODMAP serving size of 75 g according to Monash University lab testing.

Is Parmesan Low FODMAP?

It might surprise you to learn that many cheeses are considered low FODMAP. Parmesan is low FODMAP in 30 g portions according to Monash University lab testing. Read our article, Is Cheese Low FODMAP? to learn how to determine if any cheese is low FODMAP.

Is Olive Oil Low FODMAP?

All pure fats, such as olive oil, contain no FODMAPs. FODMAPs are carbohydrates, so pure fats and proteins contain no FODMAPs.

baked-root-vegetable-tian-in-glass-dish-on-white-painted-surface-ready-to-eat

How To Make Low FODMAP Root Vegetable Tian

Position rack in center of oven. Preheat oven to 375°F (190°C). Coat a deep-dish 9 ½-inch (24 cm) pie plate or similarly sized ceramic dish with olive oil; I like to use a pastry brush.

olive-oil-brushed-all-over-the-inside-of-a-glass-dish-1

Set your mandoline to the 1/8-inch (3 mm) setting and slice the potatoes, sweet potatoes, parsnips and beets into thin rounds, taking care with your fingers! You can also manually slice, which will take longer. Evenly and thinly cut vegetables will make or break this dish.

sliced-root-vegetables-in-a-glass-dish

Arrange the vegetables in an overlapping fashion, starting with an outer ring.

sliced-root-vegetables-layererd-in-a-glass-dish

You have more potatoes than anything else, so you might place to or three slices of those, interspersed with one of the others as you go around.

If you don’t want beet stains like I got, you can wear rubber gloves!

Keep going, layering the evenly sliced root vegetables in your prepared dish.

sliced-root-vegetables-layererd-in-a-glass-dish-creating-a-ring

I created a rose-like center by arranging the slices in a small rounded, cupped fashion. Use the images to guide you; you can see the center arrangement below.

root-vegetable-tian-in-round-dish-before-baking

Drizzle or brush the 2 tablespoons of olive oil evenly over all…

brushing-olive-oil-on-sliced-root-vegetables-layererd-in-a-glass-dish

…then sprinkle with Parmesan and thyme and season with salt and pepper.

sliced-root-vegetables-layererd-in-a-glass-dish-sprinkled-with-Parmesan-cheese-and-dried-thyme

Cover tightly with aluminum foil and roast for 30 minutes, then remove foil and roast for 25 to 35 more minutes or until vegetables are tender and dish is lightly browned. Serve hot, warm or at room temperature.

root-vegetable-tian-after-roasting

Can I Make This Low FODMAP Root Vegetable Tian Ahead?

You can assemble the entire dish, cover with aluminum foil as directed, and refrigerate at that point overnight. Bring back to room temperature before roasting.

More Root Vegetable Low FODMAP Recipes

Calling all root vegetable lovers! Low FODMAP? No problem!

baked-root-vegetable-tian-in-glass-dish-on-white-painted-surface
5 from 4 votes

Low FODMAP Root Vegetable Tian

Our Low FODMAP Root Vegetable Tian combines no-FODMAP potatoes and parsnips with low FODMAP amounts of beets and sweet potatoes. Sliced thinly, arranged in a baking dish, drizzled with extra-virgin oil, sprinkled with salt, pepper and dried thyme and a little Parmesan, this spectacular side-dish will enhance your weekday roast chicken – or make for a holiday meal or festive get-together.

Makes: 8 Servings
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour 5 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 20 minutes
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus extra for coating pan
  • 1 ¼- pounds (570 g) Yukon gold potatoes, peeled
  • 10- ounces (280 g) sweet potato, peeled
  • 8- ounce (225 g) parsnips, trimmed and peeled
  • 5- ounces (140 g) beetroot, trimmed and peeled
  • 1/3 cup (40 g) grated Parmesan
  • ½ teaspoon dried thyme
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Preparation:

  1. Position rack in center of oven. Preheat oven to 375°F (190°C). Coat a deep-dish 9 ½-inch (24 cm) pie plate or similarly sized ceramic dish with olive oil; I like to use a pastry brush.
  2. Set your mandoline to the 1/8-inch (3 mm) setting and slice the potatoes, sweet potatoes, parsnips and beets into thin rounds, taking care with your fingers! You can also manually slice, which will take longer. Evenly and thinly cut vegetables will make or break this dish.
  3. Arrange the vegetables in an overlapping fashion, starting with an outer ring. You have more potatoes than anything else, so you might place to or three slices of those, interspersed with one of the others as you go around. I created a rose-like center by arranging the slices in a small rounded, cupped fashion. Use the images to guide you.
  4. Drizzle the 2 tablespoons of olive oil evenly over all, then sprinkle with Parmesan and thyme and season with salt and pepper. Cover tightly with aluminum foil and roast for 30 minutes, then remove foil and roast for 25 to 35 more minutes or until vegetables are tender and dish is lightly browned. Serve hot, warm or at room temperature.

Tips

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

  • Beets: Also called “beetroot”, this root vegetable has been lab tested by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly. Monash has determined that a Green Light low FODMAP amount is 20 g, while FODMAP Friendly gives them a “PASS” at ½ cup (75 g).
  • Cheese: Many cheeses have low FODMAP serving sizes. The low FODMAP diet is not a dairy-free diet. Hard cheeses such as Parmigiano Reggiano or Pecorino Romano have been lab tested by Monash University and are low FODMAP in 40 g amounts.
  • Oil: All pure oils are fats and contain no carbohydrates, therefore they contain no FODMAPs.
  • Parsnips: Parsnips have been lab tested by Monash University and have shown no detectable FODMAPs.
  • Potatoes: Potatoes have been lab tested and deemed low FODMAP by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly. According to Monash, starchy baking potatoes, red-skinned, yellow-skinned and purple potatoes contain no FODMAPs.
  • Sweet Potatoes: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested sweet potatoes and deemed them to be low FODMAP in ½ cup (75 g) portions.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: American

Nutrition

Calories: 186kcal | Carbohydrates: 26g | Protein: 6g | Fat: 7g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Cholesterol: 9mg | Sodium: 172mg | Potassium: 475mg | Fiber: 4g | Sugar: 5g | Vitamin A: 85IU | Vitamin C: 20mg | Calcium: 131mg | Iron: 1mg

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.