Recipes | Cookies, Brownies & Bars

Low FODMAP Gingerbread Chocolate Chunk Cookies

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Our Low FODMAP Gingerbread Chocolate Chunk Cookies are the perfect recipe for chocolate chunk cookie lovers – who also happen to crave the flavors of gingerbread. The molasses in the recipe is in a low FODMAP amount, if you stick with our serving size.

Low FODMAP Gingerbread Chocolate Chunk Cookies on tartan napkin.
Photo credit: Dédé Wilson from FODMAP Everyday®

Is Molasses Low FODMAP?

Molasses is one of those foods that you might hear is low FODMAP, but it all depends on serving sizes. Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested molasses. Neither details what kind. Their low FODMAP serving sizes range from 3 g to 5 g. The Monash suggested amount of 5 g is equivalent to 1 teaspoon. Molasses contains both fructose and fructans.

Make sure to read the recipe though before starting. The cookie dough requires a 4-hour chilling time, and is perfect if chilled overnight.

Low FODMAP Gingerbread Chocolate Chunk Cookies on tartan napkin; manicured hand.
These cookies are a bit crispy on the edges and chewy in the center. Photo credit: Dédé Wilson from FODMAP Everyday®

Is Dark Chocolate Low FODMAP?

Yes it is! Monash University has lab tested two kinds of dark chocolate and each has its own recommended amounts. 85% cacao mass dark chocolate is Green Light/Low FODMAP at 20 g; it become Moderate for FODMAP in servings ≥350 g. Dark chocolate with no cacao percentage given receives a Green Light/Low FODMAP serving of 30 g; Moderate at 80 g (lactose being limiting factor); HIGH at 125 g (lactose and fructans present).

Low FODMAP Gingerbread Chocolate Chunk Cookies on plate.
Photo credit: Dédé Wilson from FODMAP Everyday®

Read more in our article, All About Dark Chocolate & The Low FODMAP Diet.

FODMAP Information

All recipes are based upon Monash University & FODMAP Friendly science at time of initial publication.

  • Brown Sugar: Brown sugar has been lab tested by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly. There are many kinds of brown sugar, from cane to beet (to blends) to Muscovado and more, which we discuss in our Explore An Ingredient: Sugar. Unfortunately, there is no information about what kind of brown sugars were lab tested. Monash gives us a low FODMAP amount of ¼ cup or 40 g but no further information. In addition, in private correspondence with Monash University we know that there are amounts larger than 40 g that would be considered low FODMAP. FODMAP Friendly gives us a low FODMAP amount of 13 g. Dark brown Muscovado sugar does appear in a product lab tested and certified low FODMAP by FODMAP Friendly, so we do know there is a low FODMAP amount. 
  • Butter: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested butter. Monash states that a low FODMAP Green Light portion is 1 tablespoon or 19 g and also states that “butter is high in fat and does not contain carbohydrates (FODMAPs)”. FODMAP Friendly gives it a “Pass” at 1 tablespoon or 19 g. Both recommended serving sizes are presented as part of healthy eating guidelines, not as maximum FODMAP serving size. Fat can affect guy motility and trigger IBS symptoms in some people. Eat to your tolerance.
  • Chocolate: Monash University has lab tested dark, milk and white chocolate all have low FODMAP amounts: 85% dark at 20 g; dark at 30 g; milk at 20 g; white at 25 g. FODMAP Friendly has also lab tested dark chocolate, milk and white chocolate. Their lab tests place low FODMAP servings for dark chocolate at 30 g, with a max low FODMAP serving size of 101 g. Milk chocolate is 30 g with a 38 g max serve; white chocolate is also 30 g with a max low FODMAP serve of 38 g.
  • Eggs: Eggs are high in protein and do not contain carbohydrates, according to Monash University.
  • Spices: Many fresh and dried spice have been lab tested by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly and are easily looked up in the apps, which we strongly suggest that you have. The additional good news is that if you are interested in a spice that has not been lab tested, you can look at the nutritional panel and assess its FODMAP load for yourself. If the “Sugars” and/or “Carbs” are 1 g or less per serving, then the item would be a good bet to try.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. Foods will be retested from time to time; in the case of raw ingredients, such as fruits and vegetables, results may vary. All lab tested results are valid and represent a snapshot in time. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Low FODMAP Gingerbread Chocolate Chunk Cookies held over napkin.
Photo credit: Dédé Wilson from FODMAP Everyday®

For More Gingerbread Recipes

We love the flavors of gingerbread. Check out these other low FODMAP gingerbread recipes.

Low FODMAP Gingerbread Chocolate Chunk Cookies on tartan napkin.
5 from 2 votes

Low FODMAP Gingerbread Chocolate Chunk Cookies

Low FODMAP Gingerbread Chocolate Chunk Cookies are spicy chocolate chunk cookies with the gingerbread flavors you crave, from molasses and spices.

Low FODMAP Serving Size Info: Makes about 2 dozen cookies; serving size 1 cookie

Makes: 24 cookies
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 12 minutes
Chilling Time: 4 hours
Total Time: 4 hours 22 minutes
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

  • 2 2/3 cups (386 g) low FODMAP, gluten-free all-purpose flour, such as Bob's Red Mill 1 to 1 Gluten Free Baking Flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup (2 sticks; 226 g) unsalted butter, at room temperature, cut into pieces
  • 1 cup (213 g) firmly packed light brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup (99 g) sugar
  • 1/4 cup (60 ml) unsulphured molasses
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 2 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 12 ounces (340 g) dark chocolate, cut into approximately ½ inch (12 mm) pieces (about 2 cups); we like 60% to 70% cacao

Preparation:

  1. In a small bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda and salt to aerate and combine; set aside.

  2. Beat butter with electric mixer on medium-high speed in a large bowl until creamy. Add brown sugar and sugar and beat until lightened, about 3 minutes, scraping down bowl as needed. Beat in molasses, then beat in vanilla and spices, and then beat in eggs one at a time allowing each one to be incorporated before adding the next. Beat in the dry mixture until a few streaks of flour remain. Add chocolate and beat just until combined. Cover the bowl and chill for at least 4-hours but preferably overnight.

  3. Position racks in upper and lower thirds of oven. Preheat oven to 375°F (190°C). Line two half sheet pans with parchment paper.

  4. Form golf ball sized balls and place the cookies 8 per pan, spaced evenly apart. No need to press them down.
  5. Bake for about 9 to 12 minutes, rotating pans front to back and from one rack to another, halfway through. Bake until lightly browned with the edges firmer than the centers, which should be soft. The cookies firm up tremendously upon cooling. Cool cookies completely on pans set on racks. (Make subsequent batches with cooled pans). Cookies are best served the same day but may be stored at room temperature in an airtight container for up to 3 days.

Notes:

FODMAP Information

All recipes are based upon Monash University & FODMAP Friendly science at time of initial publication.

  • Brown Sugar: Brown sugar has been lab tested by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly. There are many kinds of brown sugar, from cane to beet (to blends) to Muscovado and more, which we discuss in our Explore An Ingredient: Sugar. Unfortunately, there is no information about what kind of brown sugars were lab tested. Monash gives us a low FODMAP amount of ¼ cup or 40 g but no further information. In addition, in private correspondence with Monash University we know that there are amounts larger than 40 g that would be considered low FODMAP. FODMAP Friendly gives us a low FODMAP amount of 13 g. Dark brown Muscovado sugar does appear in a product lab tested and certified low FODMAP by FODMAP Friendly, so we do know there is a low FODMAP amount.
  • Butter: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested butter. Monash states that a low FODMAP Green Light portion is 1 tablespoon or 19 g and also states that “butter is high in fat and does not contain carbohydrates (FODMAPs)”. FODMAP Friendly gives it a “Pass” at 1 tablespoon or 19 g. Both recommended serving sizes are presented as part of healthy eating guidelines, not as maximum FODMAP serving size. Fat can affect guy motility and trigger IBS symptoms in some people. Eat to your tolerance.
  • Chocolate: Monash University has lab tested dark, milk and white chocolate all have low FODMAP amounts: 85% dark at 20 g; dark at 30 g; milk at 20 g; white at 25 g. FODMAP Friendly has also lab tested dark chocolate, milk and white chocolate. Their lab tests place low FODMAP servings for dark chocolate at 30 g, with a max low FODMAP serving size of 101 g. Milk chocolate is 30 g with a 38 g max serve; white chocolate is also 30 g with a max low FODMAP serve of 38 g.
  • Eggs: Eggs are high in protein and do not contain carbohydrates, according to Monash University.
  • Spices: Many fresh and dried spice have been lab tested by both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly and are easily looked up in the apps, which we strongly suggest that you have. The additional good news is that if you are interested in a spice that has not been lab tested, you can look at the nutritional panel and assess its FODMAP load for yourself. If the “Sugars” and/or “Carbs” are 1 g or less per serving, then the item would be a good bet to try.

 Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. Foods will be retested from time to time; in the case of raw ingredients, such as fruits and vegetables, results may vary. All lab tested results are valid and represent a snapshot in time. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Course: Dessert, Snack
Cuisine: American

Nutrition

Calories: 321kcal | Carbohydrates: 35g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 19g | Saturated Fat: 4g | Cholesterol: 18mg | Sodium: 152mg | Potassium: 108mg | Fiber: 4g | Sugar: 17g | Vitamin A: 30IU | Calcium: 27mg | Iron: 2.5mg

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.