Recipes | Slow Cooker

Low FODMAP Slow Cooked Asian-Style Pork

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Low FODMAP Slow Cooked Asian-Style Pork can be made in 4 hours in your slow-cooker set on high. It features flavors of Chinese five-spice powder, ginger, soy sauce, garlic and a bit of red pepper. Dried shiitake mushrooms add an earthiness and umami but are optional – and they do have a low FODMAP serving size! More on that below. You need a 6-quart (5.7 L) slow-cooker for this recipe. 

Low FODMAP Slow Cooked Asian-Style Pork with Noodles on blue plate; broccoli on the side
Slurpy noodles are a perfect starch with this dish.

We love serving this dish with low FODMAP noodles, but you could offer rice, as an option. A side dish of a green vegetable rounds out the meal. How about braised bok choy or steamed broccoli? Our Low FODMAP Slow Cooked Asian-Style Pork was inspired by a recipe we found at Food Network, but we took it through our FODMAP IT!™ process  and kept the garlic flavor!

Low FODMAP Slow Cooked Asian Style Pork on blue plate with Noodles and broccoli
This is Asian-style comfort food; a side of broccoli is a great addition.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is Garlic Powder Low FODMAP?

Conventional garlic powder is high FODMAP, but luckily for us we have options with loads of garlic flavor yet are low FODMAP. Perhaps you are acquainted with Low FODMAP Garlic-Infused Oil, but in this instance additional oil is not needed or desired (the pork tends to throw off a bit of fat).
 
For this dish I suggest using FreeFod Garlic Replacer. It is a lab tested and certified by FODMAP Friendly and is a great way to add garlic flavor to dishes without added salt or fat. The one caveat when using this product is that it is best added to water-based liquids as it will seize up and clump if added to oil. This is why we dissolve it in the liquids prior to adding the toasted sesame oil to the pot.

What Is 5-Spice Powder?

As the name would suggest, 5-spice powder is a blend containing cinnamon (preferably Chinese cassia cinnamon), fennel seeds, Sichuan peppercorns, cloves and star anise. Some blends add ginger. It should be easy to find and can add complex flavor to your Asian cooking.

Is Soy Sauce Low FODMAP?

Soy can be confusing for many because there are soy products that are low FODMAP and ones that are not. Please read our article, Are Soy Sauce and Tamari Low FODMAP? for a deeper dive. What you need to know for this recipe is the following: Soy sauce has been lab tested by Monash University and low FODMAP serving sizes are generous 2 Australian tablespoon (42 g) amounts. FODMAP Friendly has lab tested soy sauce as well and they set a low FODMAP serving at 1.48 ounces or 42 g. Their app helpfully points out that a maximum serving size is 1000-ounces or 1000 g. You might want to read What Is A Low FODMAP Serving Size? for more information on how serving sizes are set.

Are Shiitake Mushrooms Low FODMAP?

Both fresh and dried shiitake mushrooms have small low FODMAP serving size amounts. For dried, Monash University lab testing has indicated that 7 g is low FODMAP. Monash says that is about 2 mushrooms, but in our experience their size varies widely; always go by weight. The amount used in a recipe must be divided by the serving size number, of course. They are optional, but they add a fantastic depth of flavor to the dish. You don’t even have to rehydrate them! Just crumble them by hand into the liquid mixture.

dried shiitake mushrooms on white background

Just look at this enticing plate of food!

super closeup Low FODMAP Slow Cooked Asian Style Pork on blue plate with Noodles and broccoli

Ingredients

Most of the ingredients for this dish will be readily accessible. We often shop for Asian ingredients in a local Asian store, where they prices are must more economical than the supermarket or online.

Slow Cooked Asian style pork ingredients

Depending on your shopping situation you might have to order online, but the great news is that you can find all the necessary ingredients. We do always have to order the FreeFod Garlic Replacer, but we highly suggest that you have it in your pantry.

Buy Quality Soy Sauce

I do want to point out that the soy sauce is a significant ingredients and qualities of soy sauce vary hugely. You can read more in our article, Are Soy Sauce & Tamara Low FODMAP? A key point is that there is naturally brewed and chemically brewed and the former is far superior and what we recommend.

I used San J Low Sodium Gluten Free Tamari for this recipe. Take a look:

San J tamari bottle held in hand
San J also has a black label version of this soy sauce, also GF and low sodium which would work as well.

Making Low FODMAP Slow Cooked Asian-Style Pork

Use your hands to rub the pork all over with the five-spice powder, salt and pepper.

pork shoulder coated with spices on white cutting board

Add the chicken stock, soy sauce, scallion greens, brown sugar, red pepper and ginger to your 6-quart (5.7 L) slow cooker.

soy sauce, ginger and scallion greens in slow cooker

If you are going to use the mushrooms, crumble them into the pot now. Sprinkle the FreeFod Garlic Replacer into the liquid and stir everything together.

FreeFod garlic replacer in glass dish held in hand

Then stir in the toasted sesame oil.

toasted sesame oil in white dish held in hand

Add the pork, turning it over a few times to coat evenly with the liquid mixture.

pork and liquid in slow cooker

Cover the cooker, set it to high, and cook for 4 hours. Check the pork; it should be tender and shred-able with a fork.

slow cooked pork being shredded with fork, in pot
Cook the pork until it is tender enough to shred with a fork.

If it is not, set the slow cooker to low and continue to cook until the meat is very tender, maybe another 30 minutes to an hour.

Transfer the pork to a cutting board, cover lightly with foil, and let rest 15 minutes. Meanwhile, pour the cooking liquid into a measuring cup and skim off and discard any fat that rises to the surface. Fish out and discard the ginger chunks but leave the scallion greens and mushrooms (if used) in there. If you like, you can boil the sauce in a pot on the stovetop to reduce a bit.

Shred the meat while still warm using two forks and return to the sauce. We love this dish with low FODMAP noodles, but it goes well with rice as well. A green veggie on the side such as broccoli, green beans or bok choy is a nice addition. Serve immediately or leftovers can be refrigerated in an airtight container for 4 days. 

FODMAP Information

All recipes are based upon Monash University & FODMAP Friendly science at time of initial publication.

  • Ginger: Monash University has lab tested fresh ginger root and has determined it to be free of FODMAPs, making it one of our go-to no FODMAP foods.
  • Low FODMAP Garlic Powder: Conventional garlic powder is made from dried and granulated or powdered garlic cloves and is considered high FODMAP. There are a couple of low FODMAP garlic powders on the market: FreeFod Garlic Replacer and Fodmazing Garlic Substitute Replacer. The FreeFod has been lab tested and is certified low FODMAP by FODMAP Friendly. They both contain the same ingredients – maltodextrin and natural garlic flavor. We find them to be excellent additions to your herb and spice collection. Use them as you would conventional garlic powder.
  • Scallions: The green parts of scallions are low FODMAP as determined by Monash University lab testing and can be used to add onion flavor to your low FODMAP cooking.
  • Sugar: Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested white, granulated sugar. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving size of white sugar is ¼ cup (50 g). FODMAP Friendly simply states that they have tested 1 tablespoon and that it is low FODMAP. Regular granulated white sugar is sucrose, which is a disaccharide made up of equal parts glucose and fructose. Sucrose is broken down and absorbed efficiently in the small intestine. 

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. Foods will be retested from time to time; in the case of raw ingredients, such as fruits and vegetables, results may vary. All lab tested results are valid and represent a snapshot in time. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Low FODMAP Slow Cooked Asian-Style Pork with Noodles on blue plate; broccoli on the side
5 from 1 vote

Low FODMAP Slow Cooked Asian-Style Pork

Low FODMAP Slow Cooked Asian-Style Pork can be made in 4 hours in your slow-cooker set on high. It features flavors of Chinese five-spice powder, ginger, soy sauce, garlic and a bit of red pepper. Dried shiitake mushrooms add an earthiness and umami but are optional – and they do have a low FODMAP serving size! More on that below. You need a 6-quart (5.7 L) slow-cooker for this recipe. 

Makes: 6 Servings
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 4 hours 15 minutes
Total Time: 4 hours 25 minutes
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

Preparation:

  1. Use your hands to rub the pork all over with the five-spice powder, salt and pepper. Add the chicken stock, soy sauce, scallion greens, brown sugar, red pepper and ginger to your 6-quart (5.7 L) slow cooker. If you are going to use the mushrooms, crumble them into the pot now. Sprinkle the FreeFod Garlic Replacer into the liquid and stir everything together, then stir in the toasted sesame oil.
  2. Add the pork, turning it over a few times to coat evenly with the liquid mixture. Cover the cooker, set it to high, and cook for 4 hours. Check the pork; it should be tender and shred-able with a fork. If it is not, set the slow cooker to low and continue to cook until the meat is very tender, maybe another 30 minutes to an hour.
  3. Transfer the pork to a cutting board, cover lightly with foil, and let rest 15 minutes. Meanwhile, pour the cooking liquid into a measuring cup and skim off and discard any fat that rises to the surface. Fish out and discard the ginger chunks but leave the scallion greens and mushrooms (if used) in there. If you like, you can boil the sauce in a pot on the stovetop to reduce a bit.
  4. Shred the meat while still warm using two forks and return to the sauce. We love this dish with low FODMAP noodles, but it goes well with rice as well. A green veggie on the side such as broccoli, green beans or bok choy is a nice addition. Serve immediately or leftovers can be refrigerated in an airtight container for 4 days.

Notes:

FODMAP Information

All recipes are based upon Monash University & FODMAP Friendly science at time of initial publication.

Ginger: Monash University has lab tested fresh ginger root and has determined it to be free of FODMAPs, making it one of our go-to no FODMAP foods.

Low FODMAP Garlic Powder: Conventional garlic powder is made from dried and granulated or powdered garlic cloves and is considered high FODMAP. There are a couple of low FODMAP garlic powders on the market: FreeFod Garlic Replacer and Fodmazing Garlic Substitute Replacer. The FreeFod has been lab tested and is certified low FODMAP by FODMAP Friendly. They both contain the same ingredients – maltodextrin and natural garlic flavor. We find them to be excellent additions to your herb and spice collection. Use them as you would conventional garlic powder.

• Scallions: The green parts of scallions are low FODMAP as determined by Monash University lab testing and can be used to add onion flavor to your low FODMAP cooking.

• Sugar: Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested white, granulated sugar. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving size of white sugar is ¼ cup (50 g). FODMAP Friendly simply states that they have tested 1 tablespoon and that it is low FODMAP. Regular granulated white sugar is sucrose, which is a disaccharide made up of equal parts glucose and fructose. Sucrose is broken down and absorbed efficiently in the small intestine.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. Foods will be retested from time to time; in the case of raw ingredients, such as fruits and vegetables, results may vary. All lab tested results are valid and represent a snapshot in time. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Course: Dinner, Main Course
Cuisine: Asian

Nutrition

Calories: 648kcal | Carbohydrates: 22g | Protein: 36g | Fat: 34g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 197mg | Potassium: 88mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 10g | Vitamin A: 52IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 7mg | Iron: 1mg

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.