Recipes | Baking

One-Bowl Low FODMAP S’Mores Brownies

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I developed our One-Bowl Low FODMAP S’Mores Brownies in response to the huge popularity of the S’More Chocolate Chunk Cookies. In this recipe you can make this jam-packed brownie in one microwave-safe bowl and the result is a moist cocoa-rich brownie topped with mini-marshmallows, milk chocolate and graham crackers – all low FODMAP, of course, and this recipe happens to also be gluten-free.

closeup overhead low FODMAP S'mores brownies on black plate
We show you how to make S’Mores Brownies in your home oven! Enjoy them year round.

S’Mores Are Not Just For Summer

Traditional s’mores are made around a campfire. A marshmallow is placed on a whittled stick, toasted over an open fire and then placed on top of a graham cracker and a slab of milk chocolate. Sometimes a sandwich is made with another graham cracker on top, but folks have strong feelings of ratio of graham cracker to milk chocolate to marshmallow.

Our One-Bowl Low FODMAP S’Mores Brownies can be made year-round in a conventional oven.

low fodmap s'mores stacked on plate
Our S’Mores Brownies are low FODMAP, gluten-free & lactose-free.
 Who Invented S’Mores?

Well, we could begin with a discussion of the marshmallow plant, Althaea officinalis, which the ancient Greeks and Romans used medicinally, but it was in the early to mid 1800s that the French created a confection with the plant’s root juice, eggs and sugar that resembled what we know as marshmallows today. By the end of the 19th century the root ingredient was replaced by gelatin and the more modern version was born.
 
Graham crackers were invented by Sylvester Graham; they were a bid towards creating a food that would; curb sexual desire. We could write a lot here, but we won’t.
 
Over the years there were s’more-like treats such as Mallomars cookies in 1913 and Moonpies in 1917, but it was in a 1927 Girl Scout guidebook that a recipe called Some More first appeared. The recipe instructed that the marshmallow be toasted until it reached a “crispy, gooey state” and then it was to be sandwiched with the aforementioned graham crackers and chocolate.

Who Named Them “S’Mores”?

No one knows. The original recipe was called Some Mores and was referenced as such through the early 1970s. Someone somewhere created the contraction. So smart.

What Kind Of Chocolate Is Best?

You could get me debating this question. Are you a traditionalist or do you go by your palate? Plain Hershey’s milk chocolate bars are considered traditional, but they are also sweeter than dark chocolate. S’mores are sweet no matter what; you might like tempering the sweetness by using semisweet chocolate. Serving size remains the same.

How Do You Toast The Marshmallows?

Have you ever toasted a marshmallow over a fire and seen it catch fire? They are easily torched. You can brown this brownie under the broiler, but I actually suggest against that if at all possible. Why? Because they can catch fire!
 
A hand-held propane or butane torch will work perfectly. You will have much greater control. And you will be ready to make our Chocolate Crème Brulée!

Ingredients

Ingredients for low FODMAP S'mores brownies

In addition to some standard baking ingredients like butter, sugar and vanilla, there are a few items you might have to buy specifically.

Marshmallows – Did you know that marshmallows are low FODMAP? Many are, although some are not. We use Kraft brand. We like the mini marshmallows, although you could use full size and quarter them, if you are so inclined.

Read more in our article all about Candy Ingredients.

Chocolate – As mentioned above, plain Hershey’s milk chocolate bars are the classic approach, but we sometimes use Ghirardelli Semi-Sweet bars. Both easy to find in U.S. grocery stores.

Graham Crackers – For the graham cracker component, which is necessary, you have to seek out a low FODMAP version and possibly order ahead. Our Supermarket Guru Monash trained RD Vanessa Vargas gives the Nairn’s a thumbs up. Yes, they contain honey, but it is in a small enough amount to be low FODMAP.

Follow our serving size suggestions to keep this recipe low FODMAP.

How To Make S’Mores Brownies

Position rack in middle of oven. Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C). Line the inside of an 8-inch (20 cm) square baking pan with foil, smoothing it out. You can also use parchment paper, which is what I used, as I intended to use a butane torch for the last step (it would burn under a broiler). Coat the foil or parchment with nonstick spray.

8-inch (20 cm) square pan, lined with parchment and coated with nonstick spray

Melt the butter in a large microwave safe bowl, then add the cocoa and sugar.

combining cocoa, melted butter and sugar in glass bowl on marble surface

Whisk until smooth, then whisk in vanilla.

cocoa, butter and sugar whisked together in glass bowl

Whisk in the eggs one at a time, allowing each to become incorporated before adding the next.

whisking eggs into brownie batter

Stir in the flour and salt until batter is well-combined and smooth.

whisking flour into brownie batter

Scrape into prepared pan and smooth with a small offset spatula.

spreading batter into pan

Scatter half the milk chocolate and half the graham cracker chunks over the batter.

chocolate and graham crackers sprinkled on brownie batter

Bake for about 25 to 35 minutes or until a toothpick just tests clean. It will look like this.

s'mores brownies, baked, in square pan, just out of the ven

Immediately, while bars are warm, scatter the remaining milk chocolate, graham crackers and marshmallows on top of the brownies in an even layer. 

mini marshmallows, graham crackers and chocolate scattered on top of brownies in square pan

To Toast In The Oven: Adjust the rack about 6-inches (15 cm) from the broiler. Preheat the broiler to high. Place the brownies under the broiler and keep a close eye on them. Your aim is to toast the marshmallows and lightly melt the milk chocolate; take care as the topping can easily burn and the marshmallows can catch fire.

Brown With A Torch: Fire up your propane or butane torch (you have one right? To make crème brulée?)  to brown your marshmallows to desired doneness and to lightly melt the milk chocolate. A hand-held torch allows much more precise control than the broiler.

mini-marshmallows-graham-crackers-and-chocolate-scattered-on-top-of-brownies-in-square-pan-browned-with-torch

Cool the brownies on a rack for several hours or until completely cool and firmed up. Use the foil or parchment to help lift the bars up and out of the pan. Place on cutting board and peel down the foil. Cut into a 5 by 5 grid into 25 bars. I like using a metal bench scraper, spritzed with nonstick spray, to cut straight down.

using a nonstick spray coated bench knife to cut s'mores brownies
I love using a bench scraper for cutting bars & brownies.

Wipe and re-coat with nonstick spray between cuts for cleanest results. Use a thin-blade slicing knife if you don’t have a bench scraper.

These brownies are best enjoyed the day they are made. You can also store them in an airtight container at room temperature overnight. A friend of mine “refreshed” hers in the microwave briefly to get the marshmallow ooey gooey and said they were divine.

vertical s'mores brownies on black plate

One-Bowl Low FODMAP Treats!

This recipe for One-Bowl Low FODMAP S’Mores Brownies joins our ever-growing collection of one-bowl desserts and baked goods:

overhead low FODMAP S'Mores Brownies on black wire tray

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

  • Butter: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested butter. Monash states that a low FODMAP Green Light portion is 1 tablespoon or 19 g and also states that “butter is high in fat and does not contain carbohydrates (FODMAPs)”. FODMAP Friendly gives it a “Pass” at 1 tablespoon or 19 g. Both recommended serving sizes are presented as part of healthy eating guidelines, not as maximum FODMAP serving size. Fat can affect guy motility and trigger IBS symptoms in some people. Eat to your tolerance.
  • Cocoa: Monash University has lab tested what they call “cocoa” and also “cacao” and they show different FODMAP content. The problem is that from the chocolate manufacturing industry’s perspective, there is no difference between cacao and cocoa powder. The FDA, The Food Standards for Australia and New Zealand, the ICCO (International Cocoa Organization) and the National Confectioners Association do not even recognize the term “cacao” to describe cocoa powder. We have an article, All About Cocoa, that we encourage you to read. It attempts to explain the discrepancies in the Monash lab testing.
  •  Chocolate: Monash University has lab tested dark, milk and white chocolate all have low FODMAP amounts: 85% dark at 20 g; dark at 30 g; milk at 20 g; white at 25 g.
  • Dairy: The low FODMAP diet is not a dairy-free diet. It is however, low in lactose. Many dairy ingredients are low in lactose, such as heavy cream and many cheeses.
  • Sugar: Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested white, granulated sugar. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving size of white sugar is ¼ cup (50 g). FODMAP Friendly simply states that they have tested 1 tablespoon and that it is low FODMAP. Regular granulated white sugar is sucrose, which is a disaccharide made up of equal parts glucose and fructose. Sucrose is broken down and absorbed efficiently in the small intestine.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

closeup overhead low FODMAP S'mores brownies on black plate
5 from 2 votes

One-Bowl Low FODMAP S’Mores Brownies

I developed our One-Bowl Low FODMAP S’Mores Brownies in response to the huge popularity of the S’more Chocolate Chunk Cookies. In this recipe you can make this jam-packed brownie in one microwave-safe bowl and the result is a moist cocoa-rich brownie topped with mini-marshmallows, milk chocolate and graham crack – all low FODMAP, of course, and this recipe happens to also be gluten-free.

Low FODMAP Serving Size Info: Makes 25 servings; 25 bars; 1 bar per serving

Makes: 25 Servings
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 35 minutes
Total Time: 55 minutes
Author: Dédé Wilson

Ingredients:

  • ½ cup (113 g; 1 stick) unsalted butter, cut into pieces, at room temperature
  • ½ cup (43 g) sifted natural cocoa
  • ¾ cup (149 g) sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 large eggs, at room temperature
  • ½ cup (73 g) low FODMAP gluten-free all-purpose flour, such as Bob’s Red Mill 1 to 1 Gluten Free Baking Flour
  • ¼ teaspoons salt
  • 2 ½- ounces (70 g) milk chocolate, chopped, divided; you can use semisweet chocolate
  • 1 ½- ounces (40 g) low FODMAP graham cracker crumbs, such as from Nairn’s Gluten Free Oat Grahams, roughly crushed, divided
  • 2 cups (85 g) miniature marshmallows

Preparation:

  1. Position rack in middle of oven. Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C). Line the inside of an 8-inch (20 cm) square baking pan with foil, smoothing it out. You can also use parchment paper, which is what I used, as I intended to use a butane torch for the last step (it would burn under a broiler) . Coat the foil or parchment with nonstick spray.
  2. Melt the butter in a large microwave safe bowl. Whisk in the cocoa and sugar until smooth, then whisk in vanilla. Whisk in the eggs one at a time, allowing each to become incorporated before adding the next. Stir in the flour and salt until batter is well-combined and smooth. Scrape into prepared pan. Scatter half the milk chocolate and half the graham cracker chunks over the batter.
  3. Bake for about 25 to 35 minutes or until a toothpick just tests clean. Immediately, while bars are warm, scatter the remaining milk chocolate, graham crackers and marshmallows on top of the brownies in an even layer.
  4. To Toast In The Oven: Adjust the rack about 6-inches (15 cm) from the broiler. Preheat the broiler to high. Place the brownies under the broiler and keep a close eye on them. Your aim is to toast the marshmallows and lightly melt the milk chocolate; take care as the topping can easily burn and the marshmallows can catch fire.

  5. Brown With A Torch: Fire up your propane or butane torch (you have one right? To make crème brulée?) to brown your marshmallows to desired doneness and to lightly melt the milk chocolate. A hand-held torch allows much more precise control than the broiler.

  6. Cool the brownies on a rack for several hours or until completely cool and firmed up. Use the foil or parchment to help lift the bars up and out of the pan. Place on cutting board and peel down the foil. Cut into a 5 by 5 grid into 25 bars. I like using a metal bench scraper, spritzed with nonstick spray, to cut straight down. Wipe and re-coat with nonstick spray between cuts for cleanest results. Use a thin blade slicing knife if you don’t have a bench scraper.
  7. These brownies are best enjoyed the day they are made. You can also store them in an airtight container at room temperature overnight. A friend of mine “refreshed” hers in the microwave briefly to get the marshmallow ooey gooey and said they were divine.

Notes:

FODMAP Information

Our recipes are based on Monash University and FODMAP Friendly science.

Butter: Both Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have lab tested butter. Monash states that a low FODMAP Green Light portion is 1 tablespoon or 19 g and also states that “butter is high in fat and does not contain carbohydrates (FODMAPs)”. FODMAP Friendly gives it a “Pass” at 1 tablespoon or 19 g. Both recommended serving sizes are presented as part of healthy eating guidelines, not as maximum FODMAP serving size. Fat can affect guy motility and trigger IBS symptoms in some people. Eat to your tolerance.

Chocolate: Monash University has lab tested dark, milk and white chocolate all have low FODMAP amounts: 85% dark at 20 g; dark at 30 g; milk at 20 g; white at 25 g.

Dairy: The low FODMAP diet is not a dairy-free diet. It is however, low in lactose. Many dairy ingredients are low in lactose, such as heavy cream and many cheeses.

Sugar: Monash University and FODMAP Friendly have both lab tested white, granulated sugar. Monash states that a Green Light low FODMAP serving size of white sugar is ¼ cup (50 g). FODMAP Friendly simply states that they have tested 1 tablespoon and that it is low FODMAP. Regular granulated white sugar is sucrose, which is a disaccharide made up of equal parts glucose and fructose. Sucrose is broken down and absorbed efficiently in the small intestine.

Please always refer to the Monash University & FODMAP Friendly smartphone apps for the most up-to-date lab tested information. As always, your tolerance is what counts; please eat accordingly. The ultimate goal of the low FODMAP diet is to eat as broadly as possible, without triggering symptoms, for the healthiest microbiome.

Nutrition

Calories: 177kcal | Carbohydrates: 31g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 6g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 44mg | Potassium: 10mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 19g | Calcium: 1mg | Iron: 1mg

All nutritional information is based on third-party calculations and should be considered estimates. Actual nutritional content will vary with brands used, measuring methods, portion sizes and more. For a more detailed explanation, please read our article Understanding The Nutrition Panel Within Our Recipes.

Bonus Pic!

Here is Nora, the four-month-old mini bull terrier, at her first photo shoot. What a good girl!

Nora's first photo shoot